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Thread: Famous Liberty Quotes That You’ll Want to Free up Some Time For

  1. #1

    Famous Liberty Quotes That You’ll Want to Free up Some Time For



    Why should you give a fig about liberty quotes?


    Have you ever spoken with someone who has just discovered a new television show, and they’re going absolutely bananas about how you need to watch it too? “Oh, I just know you’re going to love The Foolish Man and the German Shepherd Dog,” they’ll coo. “I know the title sounds a little weird, but it stars an actor I love, and there’s this one episode where the German Shepherd Dog gets jam on his necktie before a big job interview that will split you in half with laughter!” And you kind of have to smile and promise you’ll watch it, and ask them to please stop touching you.


    Libertarians are the same way about liberty. “Don’t you love liberty?” they will ask you. “Well, how would you like more liberty? Imagine how much more liberty everyone could have if we only did X, Y and Z! I love liberty so much I’d squirt it on my waffles every morning if only it were viscous instead of an abstract concept!”


    But in the libertarian’s defense, liberty really is that good.


    To be sure, no libertarian who hasn’t had key parts of their brain deactivated with giant magnets will argue that liberty should extend to harming others. “My right to swing my fist ends where your nose begins” is one of the foundational rules of libertarianism. No, liberty is about living your life the way you would like to.


    Liberty can be very productive. Write a book that challenges the status quo effectively enough and you can compel people to voluntarily change their lives for the better. Explore a taboo theme in a great movie, and you won’t have to worry about puritans manifesting themselves outside of your house in order to burn it down. Challenge an aspiring tyrant’s claims and woo away their supporters – you may just prevent an atrocity.


    Liberty can also be thoroughly unproductive. You may only wish to wear khaki shorts on the beach, drink cinnamon schnapps, and play terrible ukulele songs. You will torture fellow beachgoers’ ears by doing this and possibly bother some seagulls, but you will be happy. And free. And hungover throughout half of your lifetime, in all fairness, but the other half should be pleasant enough.


    Never accept limits to your liberty in consideration of greater protection. The people offering you that protection are by far the most dangerous thing you will ever encounter. And although liberty must be earned by the hardest of people making the greatest of sacrifices, it is as vulnerable as a Fabergé egg in a daycare for children with inner ear infections. Forfeit even the tiniest little piece of it, and the despots, the bureaucrats, and the sadists who infest government will inevitably clamor for the next. And the next. And the next.


    Give a mouse a cookie and he will ask for a glass of milk. With that, here are some of our favorite quotes about liberty.


    Quotes About Liberty


    “Give me liberty or give me death!”
    – Patrick Henry, Speech to the Second Virginia Convention, March 23, 1775


    “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”
    – George Orwell, Animal Farm (unused preface)


    “Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freeness of speech.”
    – Benjamin Franklin, Silence Dogood, the Busy‑Body, and Early Writings


    “This is my doctrine: Give every other human being every right you claim for yourself.”
    – Robert G. Ingersoll, The Liberty Of Man, Woman And Child


    “Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.”
    – Henry David Thoreau


    “Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.”
    – Thomas Paine, The Crisis, no. 4, September 11, 1777


    “Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it.”
    – George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman


    “Without Freedom of Thought, there can be no such Thing as Wisdom; and no such Thing as publick Liberty, without Freedom of Speech; which is the Right of every Man, as far as by it, he does not hurt or controul the Right of another: And this is the only Check it ought to suffer, and the only Bounds it ought to know.”
    – Benjamin Franklin, The New-England Courant, July 9, 1722


    “A state which dwarfs its men, in order that they may be more docile instruments in its hands even for beneficial purposes–will find that with small men no great thing can really be accomplished.”
    – John Stuart Mill, On Liberty


    “Every friend of freedom, and I know you are one, must be as revolted as I am by the prospect of turning the United States into an armed camp, by the vision of jails filled with casual drug users and of an army of enforcers empowered to invade the liberty of citizens on slight evidence.”
    – Milton Friedman, An Open Letter To Bill Bennett


    “The ideal Government of all reflective men, from Aristotle onward, is one which lets the individual alone – one which barely escapes being no government at all.”
    – H. L. Mencken, A Mencken Chrestomathy


    “Whenever a separation is made between liberty and justice, neither, in my opinion, is safe.”
    – Edmund Burke, Letter to M. de Menonville, 1789


    “The idea of restraining the legislative authority, in the means for providing for the national defence, is one of those refinements, which owe their origin to a zeal for liberty more ardent than enlightened.”
    – Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers


    “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.”
    – John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address, January 20, 1961


    “If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.”
    – Samuel Adams


    “Liberty has never come from the government. Liberty has always come from the subjects of the government. The history of liberty is a history of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of the limitation of governmental power, not the increase of it.
    – Woodrow Wilson, Address to the New York Press Club, September 9, 1912


    “In the early ages of the world, according to the scripture chronology, there were no kings; the consequence of which was there were no wars; it is the pride of kings which throws mankind into confusion.”
    – Thomas Paine, Common Sense


    “Even despotism does not produce its worst effects, so long as individuality exists under it; and whatever crushes individuality is despotism, by whatever name it may be called, and whether it professes to be enforcing the will of God or the injunctions of men.”
    – John Stuart Mill, On Liberty


    “Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government’s purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding.”
    – Louis D. Brandeis, Olmstead v. U.S., 277 U.S. 438 (1928) (dissenting)


    “Doesn’t matter what the press says. Doesn’t matter what the politicians or the mobs say. Doesn’t matter if the whole country decides that something wrong is something right. This nation was founded on one principle above all else: The requirement that we stand up for what we believe, no matter the odds or the consequences. When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole world – ‘No, YOU move.’”
    – Captain America, The Amazing Spider-Man: Civil War


    “Every law that curbs my basic human freedom; every lie about the things I care for; every crime committed against me by their politics; that what’s makes me get up and hound these *******, and I’ll do that until the day I die … or until my brain dries up or something.”
    – Spider Jerusalem, Transmetropolitan


    “Better to die fighting for freedom then be a prisoner all the days of your life.”
    – Bob Marley


    And I keep on fighting for the things I want
    Though I know that when you’re dead you can’t
    I’d rather be a free man in my grave
    Than living as a puppet or a slave
    – Jimmy Cliff, “The Harder They Come”


    Famous Liberty Quotes


    “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”
    – The US Declaration of Independence


    “It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance.”
    – John Philpot Curran


    “I am an American; free born and free bred, where I acknowledge no man as my superior, except for his own worth, or as my inferior, except for his own demerit.”
    – Theodore Roosevelt


    “Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide.”
    – Napoleon Bonaparte


    “I would die to preserve the law upon a solid foundation; but take away liberty, and the foundation is destroyed.”
    – Alexander Hamilton, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress, December 15, 1774


    “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”
    – Benjamin Franklin, Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin


    “Liberty, once lost, is lost forever.”
    – John Adams, Letter to Abigail Adams, July 17, 1775


    “Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves”
    – Abraham Lincoln, Complete Works – Volume XII


    “Don’t interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties. And not to Democrats alone do I make this appeal, but to all who love these great and true principles.”
    – Abraham Lincoln, Speech at Kalamazoo, Michigan, August 27th, 1856


    “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it.”
    – Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Archibald Stuart, December 23, 1971


    “For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.”
    – Nelson Mandela


    “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.”
    – Ronald Reagan, Encroaching Control, March 30, 1961


    “Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth. The checks he endeavors to give it, however warrantable by ancient usage, will, more than probably, kindle a flame which may not easily be extinguished”
    – George Washington, Letter to James Madison, March 2, 1788


    “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is it’s natural manure.”
    – Thomas Jefferson, Letter to William Stephens Smith, November 13, 1787


    Famous Liberty Quotes That You’ll Want to Free up Some Time For originally appeared on Thought Grenades, the blog on Libertas Bella.



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  3. #2
    "You can only get as much liberty as you give."--Will Rogers
    Because if someone doesn't "feel comfortable" with someone in this brave new middle school Official Culture, a death sentence is perfectly reasonable.

  4. #3
    'About the Declaration there is a finality that is exceedingly restful. It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may therefore very well discard their conclusions for something more modern. But that reasoning can not be applied to this great charter. If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final.

    'No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions. If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people. Those who wish to proceed in that direction can not lay claim to progress. They are reactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers.'--Calvin Coolidge
    Because if someone doesn't "feel comfortable" with someone in this brave new middle school Official Culture, a death sentence is perfectly reasonable.

  5. #4
    `The American people must be free, and the way to do this is to have what government you have to have on the closest level to the people.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'Politics is not an end, but a means. It is not a product, but a process. It is the art of government. Like other values it has its counterfeits. So much emphasis has been placed upon the false that the significance of the true has been obscured and politics has come to convey the meaning of crafty and cunning selfishness, instead of candid and sincere service.'--Calvin Coolidge

    Wherever despotism abounds, the sources of public information are the first to be brought under its control. Where ever the cause of liberty is making its way, one of its highest accomplishments is the guarantee of the freedom of the press.'--Calvin Coolidge

    Men do not make laws. They do but discover them. Laws must be justified by something more than the will of the majority. They must rest on the eternal foundation of righteousness.'—Calvin Coolidge

    I want the people of America to be able to work less for the government and more for themselves. I want them to have the rewards of their own industry. This is the chief meaning of freedom. Until we can reestablish a condition under which the earnings of the people can be kept by the people, we are bound to suffer a very severe and distinct curtailment of our liberty.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'This country would not be a land of opportunity, America could not be America, if the people were shackled with government monopolies.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'These are the great charities of man on which civilization has rested. They cannot be administered by government. They come from the heart of the people or they do not come at all. They are for the redemption of man. There is no other. Civilization is always on trial, testing out, not the power of material resources, but whether there be, in the heart of the people, that virtue and character which come from charity sufficient to maintain progress. When that charity fails, civilization, though it "speak with the tongues of men and of angels," is "become as sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal." Its glory has departed. Its spirit has gone out. Its life is done.--Calvin Coolidge

    'So long as the National Government confined itself to providing those fundamentals of liberty, order, and justice for which it was primarily established, its course was reasonably clear and plain. No large amount of revenue was required. No great swarms of public employees were necessary. There was little clash of special interests or different sections, and what there was of this nature consisted not of petty details but of broad principles. There was time for the consideration of great questions of policy. There was an opportunity for mature deliberation. What the government undertook to do it could perform with a fair degree of accuracy and precision.

    'But this has all been changed by embarking on a policy of a general exercise of police powers, by the public control of much private enterprise and private conduct, and of furnishing a public supply for much private need. Here are these enormous obligations which the people found they themselves were imperfectly discharging. They therefore undertook to lay their burdens on the National Government. Under this weight the former accuracy of administration breaks down. The government has not at its disposal a supply of ability, honesty, and character necessary for the solution of all these problems, or an executive capacity great enough for their perfect administration. Nor is it in the possession of a wisdom which enables it to take great enterprises and manage them with no ground for criticism. We cannot rid ourselves of the human element in our affairs by an act of legislation which places them under the jurisdiction of a public commission.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'Along with the solemn assurance of freedom and equality goes the guarantee of the right of the individual to possess, enjoy, and control the dollar which he earns, and the principle that it shall not be taken away without due process of law. This necessarily goes with any theory of independence or of liberty, which would be only a mockery unless it secured to the individual the rewards of his own effort and industry.'--Calvin Coolidge

    One of the chief errors of the present day is that of relying too much on the government and too little on our own efforts and on the people themselves. This comes to pass by supposing that, when there is something which ought to be done, we can avoid all personal responsibility by a simple ordinance requiring that hereafter it shall be done by the government. We cannot divest ourselves of our burdens and responsibilities by any such easy method. Where the people themselves are the government, it needs no argument to demonstrate that what the people cannot do their government cannot do.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'The country cannot be run on the promise of what it will do for the people. The only motive to which they will continue ready to respond is the opportunity to do something for themselves, to achieve their own greatness, to work out their own destiny.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'We review the past not in order that we may return to it but that we may find in what direction, straight and clear, it points into the future.'--Calvin Coolidge

    [The founding fathers] let slip their grasp upon conventionalities that they might lay a firmer hold upon realities.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'It is necessary always to give a great deal of thought to liberty. There is no substitute for it. Nothing else is quite so effective. Unless it be preserved, there is little else that is worth while. In complete freedom of action the people oftentimes have a more effective remedy than can be supplied by government interference. Individual initiative, in the long run, is a firmer reliance than bureaucratic supervision. When the people work out their own economic and social destiny, they generally reach sound conclusions.'--Calvin Coolidge

    'We do not need more government, we need more culture. We do not need more law, we need more religion. We do not need more of the things that are seen, we need more of the things that are unseen.'--Calvin Coolidge
    Last edited by acptulsa; 02-09-2021 at 09:37 PM.
    Because if someone doesn't "feel comfortable" with someone in this brave new middle school Official Culture, a death sentence is perfectly reasonable.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by libertasbella View Post
    "Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth. The checks he endeavors to give it, however warrantable by ancient usage, will, more than probably, kindle a flame which may not easily be extinguished”
    – George Washington, Letter to James Madison, March 2, 1788
    'The final solution of these problems will not be found in the interposition of government in all the affairs of the people, but rather in following the wisdom of Washington, who refused to exercise authority over the people, that the people might exercise authority over themselves. It is not in the laying on of force, but in the development of the public conscience that salvation lies.'--Calvin Coolidge
    Because if someone doesn't "feel comfortable" with someone in this brave new middle school Official Culture, a death sentence is perfectly reasonable.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    'The final solution of these problems will not be found in the interposition of government in all the affairs of the people, but rather in following the wisdom of Washington, who refused to exercise authority over the people, that the people might exercise authority over themselves. It is not in the laying on of force, but in the development of the public conscience that salvation lies.'--Calvin Coolidge
    And they certainly have kept the public conscience locked squarely in their crosshairs for the past several decades. But like the man once said, if their propaganda worked they wouldn't have to keep fire hosing it all over us.



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