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donnay
09-09-2012, 08:59 AM
Solutions for gout

September 08, 2012 by: Craig Stellpflug (http://www.naturalnews.com/037118_gout_solutions_remedies.html)

Gout is a very painful form of arthritis that usually attacks the big toe and can spread to the insteps, ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers or elbows. Gout occurs when an excessive buildup of uric acid in the body forms painful crystals in the joints. These uric acid crystals deposit in the articular cartilage of joints, tendons and surrounding tissues causing inflammation. Uric acid deposits can form under the skin (called tophi) and even some kidney stones are formed from uric acid crystals.

Joint pain, gout and arthritis are rare in countries where small amounts of meat is eaten such as New Zealand, China, Japan and Africa. When people from these cultures eat a western diet of too much protein, the rates of joint pain increase dramatically to match levels typical in Americans.

Uric acid comes from the breakdown of substances in the body called purines. Normally, uric acid dissipates in the blood and passes through the kidneys and out through the urine. Purines increase uric acid levels in the blood and consequently increase uric acid deposits in the joints leading to gout. Animal proteins found in poultry, seafood, eggs and red meat contain more purines than vegetable proteins.

The trouble with gout is that there is years of uric acid accumulation in the blood without any warning or symptoms until an attack is triggered by some precipitating factor like liver congestion, kidney compromise, alcoholism or protein metabolization problems.

When your liver becomes inflamed or is stressed, uric acid production can increase to very high levels, setting the stage for the development of gout. Gluten from wheat, barley and rye grains are complex proteins that compromise the gut and ultimately inflame the liver. High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is metabolized almost exclusively in the liver and causes liver congestion, fatty liver and liver inflammation; all precursors to gout.

Take this for gout and make your gout worse?

The gout medication Rilonacept is an immune system suppressor that not only puts you at risk for infection and disease but can actually make gout worse as a "side effect." Now, the new medical "cure" for one bad drug is to combine it with another bad drug to treat the side effects of the first drug. Gout is NOT caused by a lack of Rilonacept or Allopurinol, so don't even go there.

Solutions for gout

Long-term prevention of gout in the first place should be the main goal. Aside from the obvious diet and lifestyle changes of avoiding gluten, HFCS, and purine-rich foods, there are many natural adjuncts that bring relief to symptoms of gout.

• Take three tablespoons of apple cider vinegar with mother (white spiderweb like floaties) mixed with one teaspoon of aluminum-free baking soda together with two ounces of water and one teaspoon of raw honey. Drink this three times a day until complete relief is achieved and then once a week for maintenance.

• Bromelane, found in pineapple, is the supplement of choice from the local vitamin shoppe or juice a whole pineapple, core and all and drink to deliver a large dose of bromelane along with other beneficial micronutrients and enzymes

• Cherry extract, nettle and 4,000-6,000 mg of vitamin C daily

• Beet juice helps stave off acidosis while stimulating liver cells to cleanse and protect bile ducts. Whole beets help the kidneys and relieve constipation.

• Strawberries can increase the flow of blood & oxygen to the muscles and other tissues by seven percent, preventing gout.

• Himalayan salt or Celtic Sea Salt carry just under 100 microminerals, which help the body curb gout and fight crystalline buildup of gallstones, liver, kidney and bladder stones

Bottom line, don't roll over and play the patsy to Big Pharma. Gout and other diseases have causes that can be found and treated naturally.

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/gout/DS00090/DSECTION=causes
http://www.medicinenet.com/allopurinol/article.htm
http://realhealthtalk.com/correcting_the_pH.html

Eagles' Wings
09-09-2012, 09:55 AM
Thanks for bringing this in, donnay. I read this with great interest and believe gout can easily be treated this way. "Pyramid" eating does great damage.

donnay
09-09-2012, 10:34 AM
Apple Cider Vinegar for Gout....
http://www.gout-aware.com/apple-cider-vinegar-for-gout.html


Vinegar or the word vinegar traced back to the latin word
' vinum' and the French word 'vin' for wine and 'aigre' for sour.

It is a natural by product of a food organism, generally a natural starch in vegetables which once turned into alcohol ferments into vinegar.

Legend's tell that the Sumerian civilization started to use Vinegar as a cleaning agent, shortly followed by the Babylonians who used vinegar to help keep the actions of food spoiling bacteria at bay by using it as a preservative.

From the ancient Egyptian's, Hannibal, Cleopatra, the Greeks and Biblical references vinegar has been used as a beverage, a condiment, and a remedy to fight infectious disease.

Women have for centuries used White Vinegar for cleaning, as
well as for helping rashes and bites heal.

There are variations of vinegar on the market today:

Apple Cider Vinegar : Made from fermented apples

Malt Vinegar: Made from alcohol from fermented barley malt

Red Wine Vinegar: Made from wine of red grapes

White Vinegar: Made from wine of white grapes

Pure White Vinegar: Made from corn converted to starch and sugar then fermented again with a neutral spirit alcohol into vinegar.


Apple Cider Vinegar for Gout:

This is a recipe I have come across that has proved itself before and I have tried it and it works on Gout. In fact I have used it every day for now as an experiment and it controls the aches, the pain, the swelling, the gout twinges, I am extremely happy with the effects of daily apple cider vinegar for gout that I will take it for the rest of my life. For me it is life changing

There are other potential health problems that this recipe also can be beneficial.

The best part of this is it is cheap and easy to make..

Yes a home remedy this is.

Yes it aids in weight loss

Yes Grandma used it and so does lots of sufferers.

Yes you have to make it yourself

Yes it involves Apple Cider Vinegar

Yes its is called Apple Cider Vinegar for Gout


Other health problems this may alleviate are:

High Blood Pressure

Constipation

Arthritis

Cramps

Cholesterol

Diarrhea

Headaches

Indigestion

Fatigue

Gout

Ok let (sic) get into why this Apple Cider Vinegar for Gout recipe can help you:


Apple Cider Vinegar contributes to the breaking down of food in the body, it prevents harmful bacteria from multiplying, aids respiratory infections, sore throats, nasal discharges, it aids blood purification and circulation.


Also maintains the health of the Kidneys and Bladder.

It is full of pectin ( attaches to cholesterol globules ) and minerals, vitamins and beta-carotene ( fights free radicals and helps cells rejuvenate ) , carbolic acids, ketones potassium
( removes excess water and toxic waste and helps regulate bloodpressure ) malic acid and acetic acid ( fights fungal infection and relieves painful joints )
The Malic acid also dissolves deposits of Uric Acid and helps push them out of the body.

The amino acids present, act as antibiotics and as an antiseptic and reduce toxicity in the body.

If combined with centella ( Gotu Kola ) is extremely helpful and known for its Arthritic healing benefits.

Ok enough of that lets get to Apple Cider Vinegar for Gout


-THE RECIPE-

1 Tablespoon of Honey
( I do not use Honey anymore as I am used to the taste and it can be a little thick and sickly )


1 Tablespoon DISTILLED WATER


1 Tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar( make sure the Vinegar has its "Mother"in it, this is the naturally occurring strand-like enzymes of connected protein molecules formed when converting alcohol into Vinegar... its organic structure is beneficial , plus this generally is only in Organic, non pasteurized non fermented brews.)


Mix them together and drink.

Take this twice a day after meals and see the benefits in a week.

If you want you can add more water.

I have also used warm water to help melt the honey and generally I use organic honey.

It can be quite thick, and you can change the recipe and lower the honey to a teaspoon's worth if you want.

Give it a try it is worth it.

Here is a smaller version :

250 mL (8 oz) Purified Water (warm enough to melt honey)

1 to 2 teaspoons Raw Apple Cider Vinegar (Organic recommended)

1 to 2 teaspoons Honey(Local, raw, non-GMO recommended)


You didn't pay anything to get this recipe

it is simple, and works.

There you have it Apple Cider Vinegar for Gout - The Recipe-


Here are some other recipes but for general health:

The Quick Cleanser

3 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar

3 Tablespoons lemon juice, fresh squeezed if possible

3 Tablespoonshoney

also you can add 1/4 tsp cayenne, and 1/4 tsp fresh ginger

Mix with warm water , drink then rinse your teeth immediately due to potential staining.

--------------

For Arthritis

2 Cups of apple cider, 4 to 6 cloves of garlic

1 cup honey ,blend until smooth and put in fridge.. when ready to use add 1 tablespoon to a large glass of hot water and drink daily.

donnay
09-09-2012, 10:44 AM
Thanks for bringing this in, donnay. I read this with great interest and believe gout can easily be treated this way. "Pyramid" eating does great damage.


You're welcome. I just noticed that lots of people around me are getting gout and then less than a year ago Big Pharma comes out with a gout treatment. Sorry to appear so cynical, but I find it just a little obvious that people have this problem and then Big Pharma miraculously has this treatment.

Zippyjuan
09-09-2012, 12:12 PM
• Himalayan salt or Celtic Sea Salt carry just under 100 microminerals, which help the body curb gout and fight crystalline buildup of gallstones, liver, kidney and bladder stones

You would have to consume an awful lot of salt for the trace minerals in Himalayan salt or Celtic Sea Salt to have any benefits for you vs table salt. That much salt would have other negative consequences on you though. Use it for the flavor or the texture (it is not usually ground as fine as table salt)- not the minerals.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/534033-what-are-the-84-minerals-in-himalayan-salt/

Macrominerals and Trace Minerals
Himalayan salt contains the minerals that are necessary for your health, including macrominerals and trace minerals. The macrominerals are needed in relative abundance and include calcium, chloride, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and sodium. The recommended daily amount of these macrominerals depends of your age, activity level and general health. Calcium is the most common mineral in your body and is found in your bones and teeth, as well as playing a vital role in nerve and muscle health. Trace minerals are needed in small amounts for health, and those found in Himalayan salt include boron, chromium, copper, fluoride, iodine, manganese, molybdenum, selenium and zinc. Other minerals in Himalayan salt include aluminum, carbon, platinum, selenium, sulfur and titanium.

Health Benefits
Himalayan pink salt is sold as a gourmet salt for use in cooking and adding at the dinner table. Because of its minerals content, Himalayan salt is considered healthier than regular table salt, which often has additives, such as the anti-caking agent sodium ferrocyanide. The need in human nutrition for many of the minerals found in Himalayan salt remains unknown, and many of the minerals are found only in minute quantities. Himalayan salt contains some minerals that are toxic in large quantities, including lead and plutonium, but which are safe in trace amounts.

List of Elements
The Meadow lists elements found in Himalayan salt in addition to sodium and chloride. In alphabetical order, they are: actinium, aluminum, antimony, arsenic, astatine, barium, beryllium, bismuth, boron, bromine, cadmium, calcium, carbon, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluorine, francium, gadolinium, gallium, germanium, gold, hafnium, holmium, hydrogen, indium, iodine, iridium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, neodymium, neptunium, nickel, niobium, nitrogen, osmium, oxygen, palladium, phosphorus, platinum, plutonium, polonium, potassium, praseodymium, protactinium, radium, rhenium, rhodium, rubidium, ruthenium, samarium, scandium, selenium, silicon, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfur, tantalum, tellurium, terbium, thallium, thorium, thulium, tin, titanium, uranium, vanadium, wolfram, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium.



Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/534033-what-are-the-84-minerals-in-himalayan-salt/#ixzz25zteAlCX

presence
09-09-2012, 12:22 PM
For Gout I recommend PRESCRIPTION ULORIC:
http://www.uloric.com/default.aspx




WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
5.1 Gout Flare
After initiation of ULORIC, an increase in gout flares is frequently observed. This increase is due to
reduction in serum uric acid levels resulting in mobilization of urate from tissue deposits.
In order to prevent gout flares when ULORIC is initiated, concurrent prophylactic treatment with an
NSAID or colchicine is recommended [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)].
5.2 Cardiovascular Events
In the randomized controlled studies, there was a higher rate of cardiovascular thromboembolic
events (cardiovascular deaths, non-fatal myocardial infarctions, and non-fatal strokes) in patients
treated with ULORIC [0.74 per 100 P-Y (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.36-1.37)] than allopurinol
[0.60 per 100 P-Y (95% CI 0.16-1.53)] [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. A causal relationship with
ULORIC has not been established. Monitor for signs and symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI)
and stroke.
5.3 Liver Enzyme Elevations
During randomized controlled studies, transaminase elevations greater than 3 times the upper limit
of normal (ULN) were observed (AST: 2%, 2%, and ALT: 3%, 2% in ULORIC and allopurinol-treated
patients, respectively). No dose-effect relationship for these transaminase elevations was noted.
Laboratory assessment of liver function is recommended at, for example, 2 and 4 months following
initiation of ULORIC and periodically thereafter.
6
ADVERSE REACTIONS
6.1 Clinical Trials Experience
Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates
observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of
another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.
A total of 2757 subjects with hyperuricemia and gout were treated with ULORIC 40 mg or 80 mg
daily in clinical studies. For ULORIC 40 mg, 559 patients were treated for ≥ 6 months. For ULORIC
80 mg, 1377 subjects were treated for ≥ 6 months, 674 patients were treated for ≥ 1 year and 515
patients were treated for ≥ 2 years.
Most Common Adverse Reactions
In three randomized, controlled clinical studies (Studies 1, 2 and 3), which were 6 to 12 months in
duration, the following adverse reactions were reported by the treating physician as related to study
drug. Table 1 summarizes adverse reactions reported at a rate of at least 1% in ULORIC treatment
groups and at least 0.5% greater than placebo.
3
Table 1: Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥ 1% of ULORIC-Treated Patients and at Least 0.5%
Greater than Seen in Patients Receiving Placebo in Controlled Studies
ULORIC
Placebo
Adverse Reactions
Liver Function Abnormalities
Nausea
Arthralgia
Rash
(N=134) 40 mg daily
(N=757)
0.7% 6.6%
0.7% 1.1%
0% 1.1%
0.7% 0.5%
allopurinol*
80 mg daily
(N=1279)
4.6%
1.3%
0.7%
1.6%
(N=1277)
4.2%
0.8%
0.7%
1.6%
* Of the subjects who received allopurinol, 10 received 100 mg, 145 received 200 mg, and 1122 received 300 mg, based on level of renal impairment.
The most common adverse reaction leading to discontinuation from therapy was liver function
abnormalities in 1.8% of ULORIC 40 mg, 1.2% of ULORIC 80 mg, and in 0.9% of allopurinol-treated
subjects.
In addition to the adverse reactions presented in Table 1, dizziness was reported in more than 1%
of ULORIC-treated subjects although not at a rate more than 0.5% greater than placebo.
Less Common Adverse Reactions
In Phase 2 and 3 clinical studies the following adverse reactions occurred in less than 1% of
subjects and in more than one subject treated with doses ranging from 40 mg to 240 mg of
ULORIC. This list also includes adverse reactions (less than 1% of subjects) associated with organ
systems from Warnings and Precautions.
Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: anemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura,
leukocytosis/leukopenia, neutropenia, pancytopenia, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia.
Cardiac Disorders: angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation/flutter, cardiac murmur, ECG abnormal,
palpitations, sinus bradycardia, tachycardia.
Ear and Labyrinth Disorders: deafness, tinnitus, vertigo.
Eye Disorders: vision blurred.
Gastrointestinal Disorders: abdominal distention, abdominal pain, constipation, dry mouth,
dyspepsia, flatulence, frequent stools, gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastrointestinal
discomfort, gingival pain, haematemesis, hyperchlorhydria, hematochezia, mouth ulceration,
pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, vomiting.
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: asthenia, chest pain/discomfort, edema,
fatigue, feeling abnormal, gait disturbance, influenza-like symptoms, mass, pain, thirst.
Hepatobiliary Disorders: cholelithiasis/cholecystitis, hepatic steatosis, hepatitis, hepatomegaly.
Immune System Disorder: hypersensitivity.
Infections and Infestations: herpes zoster.
Procedural Complications: contusion.
4
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders: anorexia, appetite decreased/increased, dehydration, diabetes
mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypokalemia,
weight decreased/increased.
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: arthritis, joint stiffness, joint swelling, muscle
spasms/twitching/tightness/weakness, musculoskeletal pain/stiffness, myalgia.
Nervous System Disorders: altered taste, balance disorder, cerebrovascular accident, Guillain-Barré
syndrome, headache, hemiparesis, hypoesthesia, hyposmia, lacunar infarction, lethargy, mental
impairment, migraine, paresthesia, somnolence, transient ischemic attack, tremor.
Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, libido decreased,
nervousness, panic attack, personality change.
Renal and Urinary Disorders: hematuria, nephrolithiasis, pollakiuria, proteinuria, renal failure, renal
insufficiency, urgency, incontinence.
Reproductive System and Breast Changes: breast pain, erectile dysfunction, gynecomastia.
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: bronchitis, cough, dyspnea, epistaxis, nasal
dryness, paranasal sinus hypersecretion, pharyngeal edema, respiratory tract congestion, sneezing,
throat irritation, upper respiratory tract infection.
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: alopecia, angio edema, dermatitis, dermographism,
ecchymosis, eczema, hair color changes, hair growth abnormal, hyperhidrosis, peeling skin,
petechiae, photosensitivity, pruritus, purpura, skin discoloration/altered pigmentation, skin lesion,
skin odor abnormal, urticaria.
Vascular Disorders: flushing, hot flush, hypertension, hypotension.
Laboratory Parameters: activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged, creatine increased,
bicarbonate decreased, sodium increased, EEG abnormal, glucose increased, cholesterol
increased, triglycerides increased, amylase increased, potassium increased, TSH increased,
platelet count decreased, hematocrit decreased, hemoglobin decreased, MCV increased, RBC
decreased, creatinine increased, blood urea increased, BUN/creatinine ratio increased, creatine
phosphokinase (CPK) increased, alkaline phosphatase increased, LDH increased, PSA increased,
urine output increased/decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, WBC
increased/decreased, coagulation test abnormal, low density lipoprotein (LDL) increased,
prothrombin time prolonged, urinary casts, urine positive for white blood cells and protein.
Cardiovascular Safety
Cardiovascular events and deaths were adjudicated to one of the pre-defined endpoints from the
Anti-Platelet Trialists’ Collaborations (APTC) (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction,
and non-fatal stroke) in the randomized controlled and long-term extension studies. In the Phase 3
randomized controlled studies, the incidences of adjudicated APTC events per 100 patient-years of
exposure were: Placebo 0 (95% CI 0.00-6.16), ULORIC 40 mg 0 (95% CI 0.00-1.08), ULORIC 80
mg 1.09 (95% CI 0.44-2.24), and allopurinol 0.60 (95% CI 0.16-1.53).
In the long-term extension studies, the incidences of adjudicated APTC events were: ULORIC 80
mg 0.97 (95% CI 0.57-1.56), and allopurinol 0.58 (95% CI 0.02-3.24).
Overall, a higher rate of APTC events was observed in ULORIC than in allopurinol-treated patients.
A causal relationship with ULORIC has not been established. Monitor for signs and symptoms of MI
and stroke.
6.2 Postmarketing Experience
5
Adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of ULORIC. Because these reactions
are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate
their frequency or establish a causal relationship.
Immune System Disorders: anaphylaxis, anaphylactic reaction.
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: rhabdomyolysis.
Psychiatric Disorders: psychotic behavior including aggressive thoughts.
Renal and Urinary Disorders: tubulointerstitial nephritis.
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: generalized rash, Stevens Johnson Syndrome,
hypersensitivity skin reactions.


The second choice of course would be allopurinol
http://www.medicinenet.com/allopurinol/article.htm

SIDE EFFECTS: Common reactions include diarrhea (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=1900), nausea (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=24732), rash (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=1992) and itching (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=15781), and drowsiness. The most frequent side effect to allopurinol is skin rash. Allopurinol should be discontinued immediately at the first appearance of rash, painful urination, blood in the urine, eye irritation, or swelling of the mouth or lips, because these can be a signs of an impending severe allergic reaction that can be fatal. Allopurinol should be avoided by patients with a prior severe reaction to the drug. Allopurinol can cause a flare-up of gouty arthritis during initial therapy. Therefore, colchicine (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=724) often is used simultaneously to prevent these flares.

Rarely, allopurinol can cause nerve, kidney, and bone marrow damage. Allopurinol can cause a serious allergic liver toxicity that can be fatal. Appetite loss and itching can be signs of liver toxicity. The risk of this reaction increases in patients with kidney impairment. Patients with kidney impairment should receive lower doses of allopurinol.



/sarcasm

sailingaway
09-09-2012, 01:05 PM
My Dad has that. I'll pass this on - thanks!

donnay
09-09-2012, 02:47 PM
This stuff is really good.

http://securepics.org/__images/PureEncapsulations/UricAcidFormula_PE01167.jpeg

http://organicpharmacy.org/products/Uric.Acid.Formula

Working Poor
09-09-2012, 05:55 PM
I use apple cider and white vinegar for many things. I love acv for my skin. White for cleaning.

torchbearer
09-09-2012, 06:38 PM
steroid shot and a prayer.
had gout for two weeks. worst pain ever.

torchbearer
09-09-2012, 06:39 PM
the anti-Uric Acid treatment are only preventative. if you take them right before or during an attack, it will make it worse.

torchbearer
09-09-2012, 06:40 PM
My Dad has that. I'll pass this on - thanks!

some people are genetically designed to have more uric acid.
my father has gout, i have it.

sailingaway
09-09-2012, 06:46 PM
the anti-Uric Acid treatment are only preventative. if you take them right before or during an attack, it will make it worse.

I'll warn him of that then. Thanks!

torchbearer
09-09-2012, 06:51 PM
here's a new one for me:


Gout Linked to Low Levels of Lead
Aug. 20, 2012
http://arthritis.webmd.com/news/20120820/gout-linked-low-levels-lead


New evidence that links low levels of lead in the blood (http://www.webmd.com/heart/anatomy-picture-of-blood) to an increased risk of gout (http://arthritis.webmd.com/tc/gout-topic-overview) suggests that currently acceptable levels of lead exposure are too high.In a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers report that the risk of gout is apparently elevated even among adults whose blood lead levels are several times less than what the CDC considers acceptable.
“The point here is that there is no such thing as a safe lead level,” says researcher Eswar Krishnan, MD, an assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.
Gout is a painful form of arthritis (http://arthritis.webmd.com/default.htm) that's often related to a buildup of uric acid in joints, a condition called hyperuricemia. Obesity (http://www.webmd.com/diet/what-is-obesity), diabetes (http://diabetes.webmd.com/default.htm), and hypertension (http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/default.htm) are known risk factors for gout.
But, Krishnan tells WebMD, such risk factors cannot explain every case. So he went looking for others. A review of the medical literature pointed him toward lead.
Krishnan says it's been known for some time that lead in the blood at concentrations greater than 80 micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL), or eight times the acceptable level, is associated with hyperuricemia and gout. But he says that his own findings concerning much lower levels were unexpected.
"I honestly was expecting a negative result or an unimpressive one," he says. "What we found was very surprising."
Gout: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments (http://arthritis.webmd.com/ss/slideshow-gout)


Studying the Lead/Gout LinkFor the study, Krishnan and his colleagues used data from two recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which are conducted annually by the CDC. They focused on men and women over the age of 40 who had no kidney disease. In all, they examined the records of more than 6,000 adults from around the United States.
While most adults have blood lead levels below 10 mcg/dL -- the acceptable level supported by the CDC -- the researchers found that people with blood lead levels as low as 1.2 mcg/dL seemed to have an increased risk of gout.
The risk remained after they adjusted the data to account for differences in age, gender, race, diet (http://www.webmd.com/diet/default.htm), and a variety of health measures. In the study, those with the highest level of lead measured about 4 mcg/dL. Their risk appeared to be about three-and-a-half times that of those with the lowest levels of lead in their blood.
The risk of hyperuricemia -- a common forerunner of gout -- also rose significantly.
Although this study could not prove cause and effect, the research methods were able to uncover the strong link between lead and gout.
More Research Needed on Both Risk and TreatmentsAshwini Sehgal, MD, who wrote an editorial that accompanies Krishnan's study, also found the results surprising. And, like Krishnan, he says more research needs to be done before we fully understand the risks and what to do about them
more at link

torchbearer
09-09-2012, 06:58 PM
i made need to perform chelation.

torchbearer
09-09-2012, 07:06 PM
I'll warn him of that then. Thanks!

this is from medicinenet

Again, uric acid-lowering medications such as allopurinol and febuxostat are generally not started in patients who are having acute attacks of gout. These medications, when started during an acute attack, actually can worsen the acute inflammation. Therefore, uric acid-lowering drugs are usually instituted only after complete resolution of the acute arthritis attacks, but if patients are already taking these medications, they are maintained at the same doses during the acute attacks. In some patients, increasing the dose of uric acid-lowering medications can precipitate gout attacks. In these patients, low doses of colchicine can be given to prevent the precipitation of acute gout.
http://www.medicinenet.com/gout/page6.htm#gout_medications

tttppp
09-09-2012, 09:06 PM
some people are genetically designed to have more uric acid.
my father has gout, i have it.

People pass on diseases all the time. That doesn't mean they are genetic. This problem most likely could have been prvented with a better diet and can be cured without throwing chemicals in your body.

Working Poor
09-10-2012, 06:19 AM
Originally Posted by torchbearer View Post
some people are genetically designed to have more uric acid.
my father has gout, i have it.

Some people drink more alcohol and eat more steaks than other too...

torchbearer
09-10-2012, 06:38 AM
Some people drink more alcohol and eat more steaks than other too...

yes, and some people could be vegan's who drink distilled water and have gout because their body naturally produces a lot of uric acid.
no alcohol or steaks required.

KingNothing
09-10-2012, 06:54 AM
You're welcome. I just noticed that lots of people around me are getting gout and then less than a year ago Big Pharma comes out with a gout treatment. Sorry to appear so cynical, but I find it just a little obvious that people have this problem and then Big Pharma miraculously has this treatment.


Isn't the easiest way to treat gout pretty simple? Don't eat like a pig. A proper diet should do plenty to prevent gout, among other things, in most cases.

Eat healthy, be active, don't be a fat tub of goo, and most problems like this can be avoided.

KingNothing
09-10-2012, 06:54 AM
yes, and some people could be vegan's who drink distilled water and have gout because their body naturally produces a lot of uric acid.
no alcohol or steaks required.

True, but that isn't most people.

brooks009
09-10-2012, 08:28 AM
Mixing vinegar with baking soda makes a dilute solution of sodium acetate in water. You just made your own man made drug. All natural? No.

Also, vinegar its self not natural it is man made. Where do you find natural vinegar?

donnay
09-10-2012, 08:44 AM
the anti-Uric Acid treatment are only preventative. if you take them right before or during an attack, it will make it worse.


Sometimes things will get worse before they get better. That is your body trying to correct it with the help you give it. From my research gout is caused by not enough digestive enzymes. Low acid in the stomach plays a key role too. If you cannot digest the proteins, fats and minerals right they form uric acid.

It used to be mainly men got gout, but throughout the years women have been afflicted with it as well. It all cannot be genetic--IMHO, the word "genetic" is a scapegoat doctors use. I think it has a lot more to do with the process foods and synthetic drugs we are taking than anything else.

The Raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar with Mother is great. The mother in the ACV is the additional enzymes to help give your stomach the push it needs to digest better.

donnay
09-10-2012, 08:55 AM
Isn't the easiest way to treat gout pretty simple? Don't eat like a pig. A proper diet should do plenty to prevent gout, among other things, in most cases.

Eat healthy, be active, don't be a fat tub of goo, and most problems like this can be avoided.

Sure overindulging on foods is a problem. But the focal point is what are you overindulging on? They say red meat is a concern because of the purines in it. But what about not having enough digestive enzymes in your gut to digest that red meat? A healthy digestive system is key.

Another example is when people are prescribed antibiotics. When taken orally, the antibiotic kills the bad bacteria as well as the good. You need good bacteria in your gut to help you digest better. How many people are told by doctors to take a probiotic after a regime of antibiotics?

libertyjam
09-10-2012, 09:57 AM
Mixing vinegar with baking soda makes a dilute solution of sodium acetate in water. You just made your own man made drug. All natural? No.

Also, vinegar its self not natural it is man made. Where do you find natural vinegar?

wow, just wow.