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Thread: Aldous Huxley for the Ron Paul R[evol]ution

  1. #1

    Default Aldous Huxley for the Ron Paul R[evol]ution

    Long, but definitely worth the read... (emphasis mine)

    We know that it is unsafe to allow power to be concentrated in the hands of a ruling oligarchy; nevertheless power is in fact being concentrated in fewer and fewer hands... We know that, in a very large and complex society, democracy is almost meaningless except in relation to autonomous groups of manageable size; nevertheless more and more of every nation’s affairs are managed by the bureaucrats of Big Government and Big Business… It is only too evident that, in practice, the problem of over-organization is almost as hard to solve as the problem of over-population. In both cases we know what ought to be done; but in neither case have we been able, as yet, to act effectively upon our knowledge.

    At this point we find ourselves confronted by a very disquieting question: Do we really wish to act up our knowledge? Does a majority of the population think it worthwhile to take a good deal of trouble, in order to halt and, if possible, reverse the current drift toward totalitarian control of everything? In the United States - and America is the prophetic image of the rest of the urban-industrial world as it will be a few years from now - recent public opinion polls have revealed that an actual majority of young people in their teens, the voters of tomorrow, have no faith in democratic institutions, see no objection to the censorship of unpopular ideas, do not believe that government of the people by the people is possible and would be perfectly content, if they can continue to live in the style to which the boom has accustomed them, to be ruled, from above, by an oligarchy of assorted experts. That so many of the well fed young television-watchers in the world’s most powerful democracy should be so completely indifferent to the idea of self-government, so blankly uninterested in freedom of thought and the right to dissent, is distressing, but not too surprising. “Free as a bird,” we say and envy the winged creatures for their power of unrestricted movement in all the three dimensions. But, alas, we forget the dodo. Any bird that has learned how to grub up a good living without being compelled to use its wings will soon renounce the privilege of flight and remain forever grounded. Something analogous is true of human beings. If the bread is supplied regularly and copiously three times a day, many of them will be perfectly content to live by bread alone – or at least by bread and circuses alone. “In the end,” says the Grand Inquisitor in Dostoevsky’s parable, “in the end they will lay their freedom at our feet and say to us, ‘make us your slaves, but feed us.’” And when Alyosha Karamazov asks his brother, the teller of the story, if the Grand Inquisitor is speaking ironically, Ivan answers, “Not a bit of it! He claims it as a merit for himself and his Church that they have vanquished freedom and done so to make men happy.” Yes, to make men happy; “for nothing,” the Inquisitor insists, “has ever been more insupportable for a man or a human society than freedom.” Nothing except the absence of freedom; for when things go badly, and the rations are reduced, the grounded dodos will clamor again for their wings – only to renounced them, yet once more, when times grow better and the dodo-farmers become more lenient and generous. The young people who now think so poorly of democracy may grow up to become fighters for freedom. The cry of “Give me television and hamburgers, but don’t bother me with the responsibilities of liberty,” may give place, under altered circumstances, to the cry of “Give me liberty of give me death.” If such a revolution takes place, it will be due in part to the operation of forces over which even the most powerful of rulers have very little control, in part to the incompetence of those rulers… In the past freethinkers and revolutionaries were often the products of the most piously orthodox education. This is not surprising. The methods employed by orthodox educators were and still are extremely inefficient. Under a scientific dictator education will really work – with the result that most men and women will grow up to love their servitude and will never dream of revolution...

    Meanwhile there is still freedom left in the world. Many young people, it is true, do not seem to value freedom. But some of us still believe, that without freedom, human beings cannot become fully human and that freedom is therefore supremely valuable. Perhaps the forces that now menace freedom are too strong to be resisted for very long. It is still our duty to do whatever we can do resist them.
    - Aldous Huxley, "Brave New World Revisited," 1958.

    Who will join in the American Resistance?



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  3. #2

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    Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is one heck of a read

    I did a 60+ page writing on it

    I recommend this book

    totalitarian socialism in it's best form...

    EXPOSED !!!

  4. #3

  5. #4

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    on a side note his wife just recently passed away.

    Laura Archera Huxley, 1911-2007
    WIDOW OF ALDOUS HUXLEY PRESERVED HIS LEGACY

    By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
    December 15, 2007

    Laura Archera Huxley, a lay therapist, author and widow of Aldous Huxley, who shared his vision of human potential and devoted the nearly five decades since his death to preserving his legacy and helping others -- particularly children -- achieve happiness, died Thursday at her home in the Hollywood Hills. She was 96.

    The cause was cancer, said Dan Hirsch, a longtime friend.

    Huxley met her husband in 1948, 16 years after his anti-utopian novel "Brave New World" had established him as a formidable thinker, writer and social critic. She married him in 1956, a year after the death of his first wife, and over the next seven years was his muse and partner in the explorations of consciousness that helped to spark the psychedelic movement of the 1960s.

    After his death in 1963, on the day of President Kennedy's assassination, she was determined to keep his works from slipping into obscurity.

    "What Laura Huxley did was devote her life and energy and vision to making sure this very important writer in the Western canon was still in print and widely published," said Jonathan Kirsch, the attorney for the Huxley literary estate.

    One of her last projects was to bring "Brave New World" to the movie screen. It is now in development with a major motion picture studio, Kirsch said.

    Huxley also was the author of several books, including an early self- help guide, "You Are Not the Target," a 1963 bestseller. She also wrote "This Timeless Moment," a 1969 memoir of her life with Aldous; "Between Heaven and Earth" (1974); "One-a-Day Reason to be Happy" (1986); and "The Child of Your Dreams" (1987).

    In 1978 she founded a nonprofit group now called Children: Our Ultimate Investment, which aimed to foster optimal development of what she called the "possible human." It collaborated with schools in California and in Britain, working particularly with teenagers to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

    Huxley, who never had children of her own, once described its goal as "bringing children up loving the world, rather than fearing it as many children do."

    When she met her husband, Huxley was nearing the end of the first phase of her life -- as a concert violinist. Born in Turin, Italy, in 1911, she was a musical prodigy who performed for the queen of Italy when she was 14.

    She came to the U.S. in the 1940s to make her American debut at Carnegie Hall. She wound up in Los Angeles, where she played for the Los Angeles Philharmonic for a few years. In 1948, spurred to make great changes in her life after the death of a close friend, she gave away her violin and went to work as a film editor at RKO studios.

    She met the famous writer when she was trying to promote a film she wanted to make about the Palio di Siena, an annual horse race through the streets of Siena, Italy.

    Director John Huston told her that if she could get Aldous Huxley to write the screenplay, he could help her obtain financing.

    She wrote to the author, who had spent time in Italy and was then living in the desert outside Los Angeles. When she got no reply, she was a bit miffed.

    She found his phone number and called him, unaware that the number belonged to a post office near where he lived. "They asked me if it was an emergency," she recounted to the London Guardian in 2002, "and I said, 'Of course it's an emergency.' " The message got through, and she became a close friend to both Huxley and his wife, Maria.

    After Maria died of cancer in 1955, he proposed to Laura in a roundabout way, asking if she had "ever been tempted by marriage." When she said yes, he asked, "Do you think it might be amusing to travel to Yuma and get married at the drive-in?" She again replied affirmatively and they were married at a drive-in wedding chapel in Arizona.

    By then he had already begun experimenting with psychedelic drugs, particularly mescaline. (His 1954 book on his experiences, "The Doors of Perception," inspired Jim Morrison and his bandmates to name themselves The Doors.)

    He invited Laura to take LSD with him while listening to Bach's Fourth Brandenburg Concerto and they experienced "aesthetic revelations."

    But unlike their friend, Timothy Leary, who became the guru of a generation that turned on and dropped out, Huxley said she and her husband believed that while LSD had great potential for expanding consciousness, it should be used "very carefully and religiously."

    As a character in his last novel, "Island" (1962), said, such a drug "can take you to heaven but it can also take you to hell."

    (Source)
    I still find it quite interesting the events that occurred at his death.

    "On his deathbed, unable to speak, Huxley made a written request to his wife for "LSD, 100 µg, i.m.". According to her account of his death (in her book This Timeless Moment), she obliged with an injection at 11:45 am and another a couple of hours later. He died peacefully at 5:21 pm that afternoon"
    Oraly LSD is active in micograms, and even less when injected. His death must've been really interesting.

  6. #5

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    great book, great author! I wrote my research paper last year on Huxley.

    Everyone here should read politics and the english language, by orwell, as well. http://cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/Orw...d_english.html

    My favorite quote ever comes from there:

    The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one's real and one's declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms like a cuttlefish spurting out ink. In our age there is no such thing as 'keeping out of politics.' All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, follies, hatred, evasion, and schizophrenia.

    and I actually typed that from memory.

  7. #6

    Default Huxley NWO

    Huxley was a NWO goon. Also heavily influential in euginics.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by JGalt View Post
    great book, great author! I wrote my research paper last year on Huxley.

    Everyone here should read politics and the english language, by orwell, as well. http://cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/Orw...d_english.html

    My favorite quote ever comes from there:

    The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one's real and one's declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms like a cuttlefish spurting out ink. In our age there is no such thing as 'keeping out of politics.' All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, follies, hatred, evasion, and schizophrenia.

    and I actually typed that from memory.
    The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one's real and one's declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish squirting out ink. In our age there is no such thing as ``keeping out of politics.'' All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred and schizophrenia. When the general atmosphere is bad, language must suffer. I should expect to find---this is a guess which I have not sufficient knowledge to verify---that the German, Russian and Italian languages have all deteriorated in the last ten or fifteen years, as a result of dictatorship.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20030418...d_english.html


    The essential English leadership secret does not depend on particular intelligence. Rather, it depends on a remarkably stupid thick-headedness. The English follow the principle that when one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it. They keep up their lies, even at the risk of looking ridiculous.

  9. #8

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    It's hard to find worse scumbags than the brothers Huxley.
    Julian Huxley was openly involved in the eugenics movement and, together with Prince Bernhard, founded WWF.

    Aldous Huxley was schooled at Oxford, if I remember correctly he was one of the teachers of George Orwell.
    The elite have actually used the filthy (psychopathic) books 1984 and Brave New World as a blueprint for mindcontrol...

    Here you can read - Aldous Huxley "Brave new world" (1932): https://gutenberg.ca/ebooks/huxleya-...orld-00-h.html
    Do NOT ever read my posts.
    Google and Yahoo wouldn’t block them without a very good reason.






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