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Thread: [Milei WINS!] Javier Milei, Austrian econ. prof. & ancap, runs for president of Argentina

  1. #751
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    They have a few - but unfortunately, instead of actually providing any substantive examination of those few points, they only mention those points in passing so they can spend the vast majority of the article indulging in innuendo and other nonsense like griping about his dogs (or bizarrely complaining that army officers can't get tattoos, paint their nails, or grow beards).
    That was a very long laundry list of criticisms. Without being in the know and not being inclined to dig through Spanish language publications to learn more, some of it sounds legitimate, like raising politicians and bureaucrat's salaries and simply consolidating government agencies rather than truly getting rid of them. I don't view that as minor.

    Milei once said that "the State is like a pedophile in a kindergarten with children chained up and covered in Vaseline.

    Who can deny that? All the more reason to take the (Rand Paul) chainsaw to the protected class.

    As for his dogs, which has nothing to do with anything but is just interesting:

    Milei ordered that the bobbins be built where his dogs will be, that they are aggressive and cannot have contact with each other, because during the pandemic they lost sociability.

    In addition, the President revealed during a radio interview why his dogs were not living with him until now. ”What happens is you cannot move my children because the mastiffs are very large. Milton (one of the dogs) measures two meters (standing) on two legs and weighs 100 kilos, and the house to make them not a very strong construction ”, the president described.


    Yikes. Good luck with that. Those are huge dogs.

    Regarding any war on drugs, it's not a simple and easy issue and it's not just a matter of personal choice. If Reason supports a hands off approach, then it should look at Mexico for how that works out.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster



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  3. #752
    220 lbs and 6.5' tall of dogs who don't get along with each other.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster



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  5. #753
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    Is Javier Milei Making Argentina Great Again?
    The new Argentine president is popular with American libertarians, but his record at home looks increasingly populist and authoritarian.
    https://reason.com/2024/03/27/is-jav...a-great-again/
    {Antonella Marty | 27 March 2024}

    [...]
    Why is ‘Libertarian’ Reason Unreasonably Smearing Argentina’s Javier Milei?
    https://ampamerica.com/nichols-why-i...-javier-milei/
    {Brian Nichols | 28 March 2024}

    When I saw the recent hit piece by Antonella Marty, CEO of Sociedad Atlas at The Atlas Society, in Reason magazine attacking Argentina’s new president Javier Milei, I had to rub my eyes in disbelief. Could this really be coming from the CEO of a prominent libertarian think tank, published in a respected libertarian outlet ? The op-ed, which portrays Milei as an authoritarian populist, is so rife with distortions and unfounded allegations that it borders on intellectual malpractice. As a proud libertarian, I feel compelled to set the record straight and defend a man who is bravely trying to pull his country out of the abyss of socialism.

    Let’s start by examining the central claim of Marty’s piece – that Milei is not a “real” libertarian because of some of his policy decisions and rhetoric. But since when did the Atlas Society and Reason magazine, of all places, provide a platform for such blatant purity testing and gate-keeping? The reality is that governing is messy business, especially in a country as dysfunctional as Argentina. Milei has inherited an economic catastrophe marked by hyperinflation, stifling regulations, and unsustainable government spending. In this context, some deviations from libertarian orthodoxy are not only understandable, but necessary as transitional measures.

    https://twitter.com/Libertarium_arg/...69774846824742
    Translation from Spanish:

    Austin Petersen: "Javier Milei fights for the same ideals that the United States was founded on, and he does it much better than the politicians here.

    His Austrian economic theories will revitalize Argentina and make Argentina great again."

    Austin Petersen: "Javier Milei is fighting for the same ideals upon which the United States was founded, and he does it much better than the politicians here. His Austrian economic theories will revitalize Argentina and make it great again."

    For instance, Marty makes much hay over Milei’s proposed tax increases, conveniently ignoring that these are part of a broader plan to stabilize Argentina’s finances and pave the way for real free market reforms down the line. As Milton Friedman himself once said, “I am in favor of cutting taxes under any circumstances and for any excuse, for any reason, whenever it’s possible.” But even Friedman recognized that in extreme crisis situations, temporary revenue measures may be needed before taxes can be cut. Milei grasps this nuanced reality, even if Marty and the editors who published her apparently do not.

    Marty also has the audacity to attack Milei for making “only” modest reductions to Argentina’s bloated bureaucracy. But let’s be real – ANY cuts to government in a place like Argentina are a minor miracle. Criticizing Milei for not taking a chainsaw to the entire state apparatus on Day One is about as useful as condemning a recovering alcoholic for just having one drink instead of a whole case of beer. Change takes time, and Milei has his work cut out for him trying to dismantle the deeply entrenched Peronist system that has ruled Argentina for generations. The fact that he’s already slashing ministries and regulations is worthy of praise from libertarians, not petty gripes published by a think tank and magazine ostensibly committed to advancing liberty.

    Perhaps most absurdly, Marty tries to paint Milei as some sort of social conservative extremist. Yes, he is pro-life – a position shared by many libertarians who believe that abortion violates the non-aggression principle by ending an innocent human life. And yes, he uses politically incorrect language at times. But only through the most bad faith, uncharitable reading could this be twisted into Milei being an “authoritarian” who wants to police people’s personal lives. One would think that Reason, with its long history of advocating a “big tent” libertarianism, would understand that libertarians are a diverse bunch with room for disagreement on sensitive cultural issues. Personally, I’m pro-life, but I’m not about to “cancel” every libertarian leader who sees things differently, and I’m disappointed to see Reason giving a platform to this kind of intolerance.

    It’s not just specific policies where Reason gets it wrong – they fundamentally misunderstand and misconstrue Milei’s political style and appeal. The article constantly drops the dreaded “P-word” – populism – as if it’s some magic rhetorical kill shot. But here’s a newsflash: in a democracy, being popular is generally a good thing! Leaders who speak to the frustrations and aspirations of the people, even in a fiery way at times, are not automatically suspect. Would Reason prefer that Milei be an aloof, uncharismatic technocrat with no ability to inspire and motivate Argentinians desperate for change?

    Let’s not forget, every successful transformational leader in history has been labeled a “populist” by the entrenched elites they threaten. The American Revolution was a populist revolt against the monarchy. The abolitionists were populists agitating against the slaveholding class. Barry Goldwater, who more or less launched the modern libertarian political movement, was decried as a dangerous populist by the Republican establishment.

    In each case, “populism” was just the slur of choice for those clinging to a failed status quo. The same is true in Argentina today. The corrupt politicians, bureaucrats, and crony capitalists who created the current mess are terrified that Milei’s populist message is breaking their grip on power. That’s why they amplify any smears they can find, including sadly from supposed “libertarians” abroad.

    The article’s harping on Milei’s unorthodox personality and communication style also comes off as “elitist concern trolling”. So what if he has an eccentric public persona, or if his economic writings contain some unoriginal passages? Voters chose him because of his core ideas and vision, not because of his quirks or whether his footnotes are up to academic snuff.

    Here’s what really matters: is Milei directionally pro-liberty? Is he trying to steer Argentina away from the brink and toward a freer, more prosperous future – even if it takes time and the path isn’t always linear? From his public statements, policy proposals, and early administrative actions, the answer is clearly yes.

    Is he perfect? Of course not. Will he make mistakes and fall short of the libertarian ideal? Almost certainly. But that’s not the bar any politician should be judged against, especially one inheriting such a colossal mess. The relevant question is: will Milei leave Argentina better than he found it by chipping away at state power and expanding individual and economic freedom? There is every reason to believe the answer is yes.

    As an analogy, consider when you’re lost deep in the woods, exhausted and running out of supplies. There are two possible guides offering to help. One claims they can teleport you back home in an instant with no effort. The other says the journey will be arduous, and they’ll likely make some wrong turns, but they’re committed to getting you out as quickly as possible. Only a fool would follow the first guy. The second one is Milei.

    My message to my fellow libertarians, both in the U.S. and Argentina, is this: don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Our movement is finally starting to gain real political traction beyond just intellectual debates, as Milei’s election shows. With that comes an obligation to engage the system as it is, not as we wish it were.

    Purist fantasies about some libertarian philosopher-king waving a magic wand and creating ancapistan overnight were always silly, and they’re downright counterproductive now that we have actual skin in the game. By all means, let’s hold Milei accountable and push him to be the best liberty-advancing president he can be. But he needs our support, not myopic attacks and purity tests from those who seem more interested in preening their libertarian bona fides than achieving real results.

    Argentina’s situation is dire, but thanks to Milei, there is finally some real hope. Rather than smugly cutting down that hope because it doesn’t fit our preconceived notions of what an ideal libertarian leader looks like, we should be doing everything in our power to fan and nurture its flames. The future of a great country – and maybe the future of liberty itself – could well depend on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    [I]nstead of just briefly mentioning a list of tax hikes or the seemingly pointless purchase of fighter jets - which are two of the more problematic items, IMO - [Reason] could have made an effort to determine if those actions were actually instigated by Milei himself, or whether they are things he had to accede to as part of his agreement with the coalition partners (Bullrich, Obaid, et al.) whose support he needed in order to win the election (and will continue needing in order to enact other policies). In either case, they are bad things and deserve to be criticized, but as I've pointed out several times in this thread, Milei is not the OmniGod of Argentina - he was always definitely going to have to enact at least some unlibertarian policies, regardless of whether he really wanted to or not (not possibly, not probably, but definitely).

    In assessing and judging Milei, it makes a difference whether he "wanted to" or "had to". Reason could have helpfully tried to sort that out, but instead they just went "bitch mode" [1]. The nature of politics - and especially electoral politics - is that you can easily do that with anyone. If Ron Paul had become POTUS, Reason could have written exactly the same kind of article about him - "Oh, look, he appointed his less-than-honorable grandson-in-law Jesse Benton as his Chief of Staff! Nepotism!" - "Oh, look, those newsletters! Racism!" - "Oh, look, the military spent more money on planes! [2] All that 'non-interventionism' stuff must have been bull$#@!, after all!" - and so on.



    [1] I suspect this has much more to do with Reason's social libertinism vis-à-vis Milei's social conservatism than it has to do with actual libertarian principles. (Hence, their complaints about "gender issues" and Milei being a "pro-lifer").

    [2] In the case of Milei (or Ron Paul), was that money offset by greater spending reductions elsewhere? Maybe. Maybe not. If not, was it by choice or political necessity? Who knows? Reason couldn't (or wouldn't) be bothered to try to find out and tell us.

  6. #754
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    Why is ‘Libertarian’ Reason Unreasonably Smearing Argentina’s Javier Milei?
    Because Reason are mostly a bunch of Swamp creatures who have been brought to heel by the R-Establishment.
    Jer. 11:18-20. "The Kingdom of God has come upon you." -- Matthew 12:28

  7. #755
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    Why is ‘Libertarian’ Reason Unreasonably Smearing Argentina’s Javier Milei?
    https://ampamerica.com/nichols-why-i...-javier-milei/
    {Brian Nichols | 28 March 2024}

    When I saw the recent hit piece by Antonella Marty, CEO of Sociedad Atlas at The Atlas Society, in Reason magazine attacking Argentina’s new president Javier Milei, I had to rub my eyes in disbelief. Could this really be coming from the CEO of a prominent libertarian think tank, published in a respected libertarian outlet ? The op-ed, which portrays Milei as an authoritarian populist, is so rife with distortions and unfounded allegations that it borders on intellectual malpractice. As a proud libertarian, I feel compelled to set the record straight and defend a man who is bravely trying to pull his country out of the abyss of socialism.

    Let’s start by examining the central claim of Marty’s piece – that Milei is not a “real” libertarian because of some of his policy decisions and rhetoric. But since when did the Atlas Society and Reason magazine, of all places, provide a platform for such blatant purity testing and gate-keeping? The reality is that governing is messy business, especially in a country as dysfunctional as Argentina. Milei has inherited an economic catastrophe marked by hyperinflation, stifling regulations, and unsustainable government spending. In this context, some deviations from libertarian orthodoxy are not only understandable, but necessary as transitional measures.

    https://twitter.com/Libertarium_arg/...69774846824742


    For instance, Marty makes much hay over Milei’s proposed tax increases, conveniently ignoring that these are part of a broader plan to stabilize Argentina’s finances and pave the way for real free market reforms down the line. As Milton Friedman himself once said, “I am in favor of cutting taxes under any circumstances and for any excuse, for any reason, whenever it’s possible.” But even Friedman recognized that in extreme crisis situations, temporary revenue measures may be needed before taxes can be cut. Milei grasps this nuanced reality, even if Marty and the editors who published her apparently do not.

    Marty also has the audacity to attack Milei for making “only” modest reductions to Argentina’s bloated bureaucracy. But let’s be real – ANY cuts to government in a place like Argentina are a minor miracle. Criticizing Milei for not taking a chainsaw to the entire state apparatus on Day One is about as useful as condemning a recovering alcoholic for just having one drink instead of a whole case of beer. Change takes time, and Milei has his work cut out for him trying to dismantle the deeply entrenched Peronist system that has ruled Argentina for generations. The fact that he’s already slashing ministries and regulations is worthy of praise from libertarians, not petty gripes published by a think tank and magazine ostensibly committed to advancing liberty.

    Perhaps most absurdly, Marty tries to paint Milei as some sort of social conservative extremist. Yes, he is pro-life – a position shared by many libertarians who believe that abortion violates the non-aggression principle by ending an innocent human life. And yes, he uses politically incorrect language at times. But only through the most bad faith, uncharitable reading could this be twisted into Milei being an “authoritarian” who wants to police people’s personal lives. One would think that Reason, with its long history of advocating a “big tent” libertarianism, would understand that libertarians are a diverse bunch with room for disagreement on sensitive cultural issues. Personally, I’m pro-life, but I’m not about to “cancel” every libertarian leader who sees things differently, and I’m disappointed to see Reason giving a platform to this kind of intolerance.

    It’s not just specific policies where Reason gets it wrong – they fundamentally misunderstand and misconstrue Milei’s political style and appeal. The article constantly drops the dreaded “P-word” – populism – as if it’s some magic rhetorical kill shot. But here’s a newsflash: in a democracy, being popular is generally a good thing! Leaders who speak to the frustrations and aspirations of the people, even in a fiery way at times, are not automatically suspect. Would Reason prefer that Milei be an aloof, uncharismatic technocrat with no ability to inspire and motivate Argentinians desperate for change?

    Let’s not forget, every successful transformational leader in history has been labeled a “populist” by the entrenched elites they threaten. The American Revolution was a populist revolt against the monarchy. The abolitionists were populists agitating against the slaveholding class. Barry Goldwater, who more or less launched the modern libertarian political movement, was decried as a dangerous populist by the Republican establishment.

    In each case, “populism” was just the slur of choice for those clinging to a failed status quo. The same is true in Argentina today. The corrupt politicians, bureaucrats, and crony capitalists who created the current mess are terrified that Milei’s populist message is breaking their grip on power. That’s why they amplify any smears they can find, including sadly from supposed “libertarians” abroad.

    The article’s harping on Milei’s unorthodox personality and communication style also comes off as “elitist concern trolling”. So what if he has an eccentric public persona, or if his economic writings contain some unoriginal passages? Voters chose him because of his core ideas and vision, not because of his quirks or whether his footnotes are up to academic snuff.

    Here’s what really matters: is Milei directionally pro-liberty? Is he trying to steer Argentina away from the brink and toward a freer, more prosperous future – even if it takes time and the path isn’t always linear? From his public statements, policy proposals, and early administrative actions, the answer is clearly yes.

    Is he perfect? Of course not. Will he make mistakes and fall short of the libertarian ideal? Almost certainly. But that’s not the bar any politician should be judged against, especially one inheriting such a colossal mess. The relevant question is: will Milei leave Argentina better than he found it by chipping away at state power and expanding individual and economic freedom? There is every reason to believe the answer is yes.

    As an analogy, consider when you’re lost deep in the woods, exhausted and running out of supplies. There are two possible guides offering to help. One claims they can teleport you back home in an instant with no effort. The other says the journey will be arduous, and they’ll likely make some wrong turns, but they’re committed to getting you out as quickly as possible. Only a fool would follow the first guy. The second one is Milei.

    My message to my fellow libertarians, both in the U.S. and Argentina, is this: don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Our movement is finally starting to gain real political traction beyond just intellectual debates, as Milei’s election shows. With that comes an obligation to engage the system as it is, not as we wish it were.

    Purist fantasies about some libertarian philosopher-king waving a magic wand and creating ancapistan overnight were always silly, and they’re downright counterproductive now that we have actual skin in the game. By all means, let’s hold Milei accountable and push him to be the best liberty-advancing president he can be. But he needs our support, not myopic attacks and purity tests from those who seem more interested in preening their libertarian bona fides than achieving real results.

    Argentina’s situation is dire, but thanks to Milei, there is finally some real hope. Rather than smugly cutting down that hope because it doesn’t fit our preconceived notions of what an ideal libertarian leader looks like, we should be doing everything in our power to fan and nurture its flames. The future of a great country – and maybe the future of liberty itself – could well depend on it.
    Excellent response. I rarely read anything from Reason because it seems kind of commie, to me. I often see similarities between communism and whatever they're peddling (Utopia ideasphere). Where does the intellectualizing become critical theory? While some of those criticisms sounded legit, we don't know the details and will have to wait and see. I'm pro populist, too. Sure as hell beats unpopular. It's a stupid term for politics, anyway. Last but not least, I'm on record as supporting Bukele. In the ideaspehere, everything seems to start with the assumption that any given population is moral, reasonable and favors self control. Well, in real life that's not the case in a lot of places, like these violence infested $#@!holes. If Milei sees a reason to address drug trafficking, it's probably a problem that threatens Argentina, like most of Latin America.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

  8. #756
    This is where things really went to $#@! in the west. Anti human Marxism. Isn't that what Milei is also fighting?


    https://www.bitchute.com/video/QZRqHCjLvViU/
    @Occam's Banana

    How did I not embed that right?
    Last edited by susano; 03-28-2024 at 04:15 PM.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

  9. #757
    Quote Originally Posted by susano View Post
    This is where things really went to $#@! in the west. Anti human Marxism. Isn't that what Milei is also fighting?

    [BITCHUTE]QZRqHCjLvViU[BITCHUTE]
    https://www.bitchute.com/video/QZRqHCjLvViU/
    @Occam's Banana

    How did I not embed that right?
    You left out the slash in the closing [/BITCHUTE] tag at the end.

  10. #758
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    You left out the slash in the closing [/BITCHUTE] tag at the end.
    Thank you. I looked and looked at it but couldn't "see" it. This is why two heads can better than one
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

  11. #759
    Quote Originally Posted by susano View Post
    Thank you. I looked and looked at it but couldn't "see" it. This is why two heads can better than one
    You're welcome.

  12. #760
    Quote Originally Posted by susano View Post
    Regarding any war on drugs, it's not a simple and easy issue and it's not just a matter of personal choice. If Reason supports a hands off approach, then it should look at Mexico for how that works out.
    I've moved all the posts involving "War on Drugs" / "legalization" stuff to the following thread, as it is a better fit for the topic:

    The moved posts start with this one.



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  14. #761
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    I've moved all the posts involving "War on Drugs" / "legalization" stuff to the following thread, as it is a better fit for the topic:

    The moved posts start with this one.
    Good idea. Thread drift.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

  15. #762
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    I regret to inform you that Reason is at it again:

    https://twitter.com/LPNH/status/1773337490709000345


    Is Javier Milei Making Argentina Great Again?
    The new Argentine president is popular with American libertarians, but his record at home looks increasingly populist and authoritarian.
    https://reason.com/2024/03/27/is-jav...a-great-again/
    {Antonella Marty | 27 March 2024}

    In January, Argentine President Javier Milei went to Davos, Switzerland, to lecture the rich and powerful about the miracles of capitalism. During his speech at the World Economic Forum, Milei explained to his audience that entrepreneurs are heroes, socialism leads to corruption, and private property is the key to prosperity.

    In his address, he referenced Israel Kirzner, an Austrian-school economist and disciple of Ludwig von Mises, who is far outside the intellectual mainstream. He even named his cloned dogs after iconic free market economists Murray Rothbard, Milton Friedman, and Robert Lucas Jr. Many libertarians have been thrilled to hear their ideas articulated so eloquently by the leader of South America's second-largest nation, sparking widespread enthusiasm.

    I'm less enthusiastic. Born and raised in Argentina, I joined the liberty movement at 17. I delved into the writings of Friedrich Hayek, Ayn Rand, and Mises and marveled at how their insights accurately described my experience living under the big government of Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who was president for most of my adolescence. This led me to devote my career to advocating for the ideas of liberty because I believe they're the best path to prosperity and human flourishing.

    To me, Javier Milei poses a threat both to Argentina and to the global liberty movement. I see him as a self-obsessed populist with a savior complex who gratifies libertarians by echoing their ideas. Yet his actions contradict his words: He raises taxes, escalates the drug war, restricts social freedoms, threatens his political opponents, and appoints political hacks from previous corrupt administrations to positions of power.

    Milei, known for touting anti-drug policies, appointed Patricia Bullrich as his security minister, a role she previously served under former President Mauricio Macri. Bullrich recently praised El Salvador President Nayib Bukele for his tactics in reducing gang-related crimes, saying she wanted to imitate his measures in Argentina. While Bukele's policies have significantly reduced El Salvador's crime rate, they have also resulted in the arrest of approximately 1 percent of the population, including numerous instances of wrongful arrests and also destroying the rule of law. This heavy-handed strategy in El Salvador has led to a widespread erosion of basic constitutional freedoms.

    Bullrich regularly shares updates on social media of drug raids, including videos of herself incinerating seized marijuana. "We are cornering drugs and drug trafficking, " Milei said recently. "We won't concede even a millimeter."

    Some argue that fixing Argentina's economy is what really matters in a country facing nearly 300 percent annual inflation. But crime and insecurity also hinder Argentina's economic progress. Violent family-run narco gangs dominate the drug trade, especially in cities like Rosario, where the homicide rate nearly doubled from 2010 to 2020. While the president's anti-drug campaigns make for some attention-grabbing social media posts, they only make the drug trade more violent and deadly.

    Milton Friedman famously helped end the U.S. military draft. But Milei's minister of defense, Luis Petri, doesn't share the Nobel laureate's dim view of compulsory military service. Petri said in a recent interview that Milei's administration was "considering" reinstating the draft. Vice President Victoria Villarruel echoed this sentiment, suggesting that the absence of compulsory military service is "making later generations of men (and women) crybabies."

    Milei's worldview is infused with mysticism and messianic symbolism. He refers to himself as an "alpha lion," often starting his speeches by saying, "Hello everyone, I am the lion." He compares himself to Napoleon Bonaparte. A self-aggrandizing ruler who boasts of his capacity to fix society if granted the necessary power to override procedural and legislative constraints should trigger some authoritarian alarms.

    Milei dubbed the "troll president," craves adoration in ways reminiscent of Latin America's infamous leftwing autocrats, such as Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez. He surrounds himself with sycophants and loyal supporters, including personalities such as influencer and writer Agustín Laje and other high-profile influencers and paid trolls. This entourage helps Milei mock his enemies, refine his personal brand, and galvanize support among libertarians in the U.S. Milei's circle of followers reminds me of "La Cámpora," a youth group that championed Kirchnerism's political aims. But Milei's bullies are more radical and more violent.

    Milei is a publicity genius, and like Bukele and Chávez, he's obsessed with his image. He likes over a thousand tweets a day (mostly from his adoring followers), retweeting accolades and insults about his "enemies." He loves outrage. On one occasion, Milei once said that "the State is like a pedophile in a kindergarten with children chained up and covered in Vaseline."

    Both former President Donald Trump and Milei are known for their tendency to appeal to emotions and cast societal divides in terms of "the people" vs. "the elites" or "us" vs. "them." This approach, known as populism, undermines institutions and amplifies the power of the state in ways that should be alarming, regardless of whether it comes from the political left or right. In The Road to Serfdom, Hayek wrote, "the contrasts between the 'we' and the 'they,' the common fight against those outside the group, seems to be an essential ingredient in any creed which will solidly knit together a group for common action." Populism works as a pendulum, suggesting that Milei's actions could provoke a counteraction from the opposite side of the spectrum once his term concludes.

    Milei has turned on former allies who question his authority. Ricardo López Murphy, a respected figure within classical liberal circles and former mentor to Milei, declined to support Milei in the primaries over concerns about his populist tendencies. Last month, he criticized Murphy, labeling him "a scumbag" and a "traitor to the ideas [of freedom]." López Murphy responded, "The Milei experience has nothing to do with [classical] liberals."

    Although Milei enjoys broad support among American libertarians, several Argentine classical liberals perceive him as a continuation of the country's previous administrations. Economist Roberto Cachanosky compared Milei's approach to Kirchnerism. "I say this because I know him personally," Cachanosky said. "He doesn't tolerate an opinion different from his own."

    Economist Diego Giacomini, who co-authored four books with Milei, has become one of his most vocal critics. He describes Milei as a conservative populist "stand[ing] in opposition to the Austrian school [of economics], the most liberal school of thought of all, to which I belong and to which Javier Milei once belonged."

    After a dispute between the province of Chubut and the National Government, Milei tweeted the AI-generated image depicting Gov. Ignacio Torres with Down syndrome. The incident was reminiscent of when Donald Trump mocked a disabled reporter at a campaign rally. Milei has said he's "naturally aligned with Donald Trump." When Milei met Trump at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in February, he greeted him with a bear hug. Milei promised to "Make Argentina Great Again," and in a video, he told Trump, "You were a great president, and I hope you will be again."

    Milei has a politician's knack for adopting positions that will attract a broader support base. During a visit to Israel, he identified himself as Jewish. Yet when he went to the Vatican to meet with the pope, he said he was a "Catholic, Evangelical, and also practices a bit of Judaism." This came after previous statements where Milei described the pope as the "person who represents evil on earth and occupies the throne of God."

    Milei embodied a common trait among Latin American politicians: a tendency towards nepotism, entrusting state resources and government positions to unelected individuals based on family connections. Milei appointed his sister Karina as general secretary of the presidency, effectively making her his top adviser. He calls her "the boss." The practice echoes throughout the region: Nicaraguan dictator Daniel Ortega famously referred to his wife as the "co-president of the Republic," while Bukele's brothers serve as his principal advisors in El Salvador. Fidel Castro's successor as Cuba's dictator was his brother Raúl, who had been the most senior member of his administration.

    Milei has compared his sister to Moses, characterizing himself as a conduit for her vision. "Moses was a great leader but wasn't good at spreading the word. So, God sent Orion to spread the word. 'Kari' is Moses, and I am the one who spreads the word. I am just a preacher." Milei's slogan is "The forces of heaven," suggesting he may have lost sight of the importance of maintaining a distance between church and state.

    Nepotism extends beyond Milei himself, permeating his party. Martín Menem, president of the Lower House of Representatives and member of Milei's party, recently appointed his 23-year-old nephew as an advisor. Milei's spokesperson, Manuel Adorni, hired his brother as an advisor at the Ministry of Defense. Additionally, Vilma Facunda Bedia, an evangelical pastor and senator from Milei's party, recently employed eleven family members, including her three sons, her daughter-in-law, her brother, and her sister-in-law, as political advisors.

    Milei recently nominated Judge Ariel Lijo to the Supreme Court, overlooking his role in encouraging Argentina's culture of leniency towards corrupt politicians. Lijo has a history of dismissing high-profile cases, including dropping corruption charges against former Vice President Amado Boudou and clearing money laundering charges against former President Cristina Kirchner. He also dismissed charges against a former intelligence chief implicated in transferring a suitcase full of cash to the Venezuelan regime and dismissed charges in a corruption case surrounding the state-owned energy company YPF.

    Héctor M. Guyot, a journalist for La Nación, said that Lijo faces significant criticism from both legal and journalistic fronts for his questionable management of critical cases. He further accused him of working with a network of "judicial operators" from different political parties, which include his brother Freddy Lijo, Daniel Angelici and Scioli's former employee, and Guillermo Scarcella.

    When there aren't enough family members to fill key political positions, cronies are often next in line. The Milei administration is no exception. Daniel Scioli, whom Milei appointed secretary of Tourism, Environment, and Sports, is a "caste" politician and a veteran Peronist. Scioli has a long history in Argentine politics: He served as vice president under Néstor Kirchner, a prominent figure in left-wing populism and an ally of Chávez; ran for president alongside Cristina Kirchner against Mauricio Macri; and served as minister of production under former President Alberto Fernández.

    Milei's Interior Minister Guillermo Francos was, until recently, executive director for Argentina at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a role he was appointed to by former leftist President Fernández. Between 2000 and 2007, Francos served as the president of Aeropuertos Argentina 2000, the company owned by long-time businessman Eduardo Eurnekian, which has a state-granted monopoly over airport concessions throughout Argentina. Milei also worked for Aeropuertos Argentina in 2000 until three years ago when he had to resign to take office as a congressman.

    Julián Andrés Obaid was recently appointed chairman of the Transport Security Bureau, a position he held under Fernández. According to a report from Clarín, Milei has appointed over forty Peronists to important government positions thus far.

    On gender issues, Milei aligns with cultural conservatism and right-wing ideas. When referring to his sister Karina, he uses the male pronoun "he, the boss" as a way of signaling her dominant role. He has banned gender-inclusive language in the government, including in all official documents. His administration also prohibited using non-binary uniforms for police and military officers, outlawed tattoos and painted nails, and mandated strict uniform codes—female officers are required to wear skirts unless they are pregnant, while male officers are forbidden from having beards. Yet despite his conservative measures, Milei's government allocated 827 million pesos (almost $1 million) for hormone treatment supplies for children, adolescents, and trans adults.

    Milei is a pro-lifer, asserting that life begins at conception, and has vowed to outlaw legal abortions in Argentina. "Abortion is murder made worse by the connection between mother and child," he said recently. In line with his views, nominated Manuel García Mansilla, a well-known critic of abortion rights, to the high court. During his speech at CPAC, he equated abortion to socialism, claiming that it stems from radical environmentalist views that population growth destroys the planet. Pro-choice libertarians would argue the debate is about bodily autonomy and personal liberty. Last week, he tweeted, "Abortion is a murder aggravated…by the disproportion of forces. If you are reading this post and you are one of those who positively weigh this type of aberrations, thank your mother for not thinking the same way."

    Milei is eccentric in a way that makes for a good copy—which may be entertaining from afar but is genuinely alarming for Argentines. What would Americans think if President Joe Biden claimed his dog was one of his lead advisors? Milei claims to have communicated with his deceased dog, Conan, through a medium. Conan's clones—Murray, Milton, Robert, and Lucas—are still walking the earth and doing so at taxpayer expense, as Milei recently shared a photo of their new state-funded kennel at the official presidential residence in Olivos.

    Despite constantly citing economists such as Rothbard, Henry Hazlitt, and Hayek, it's not clear that he has truly absorbed their work. His books, The Way of the Libertarian and Pandenomics, include passages directly copied and pasted from the work of those writers.

    The reality is that Milei's economic policies do not align with his rhetoric. But because he is such an effective communicator, most of his fans haven't noticed. The same president who has impressed foreigners by flying on commercial flights as a gesture of his frugality just signed a decree increasing his own salary by 48 percent and then took it back in response to public outcry.

    Despite his campaign pledge to introduce no new taxes, after he promised to sever an arm when signing an agreement with Asociación Argentina de Contribuyentes, live on TV, Milei proposed an income tax hike after returning from Davos, and more recently, he expanded the number of Argentines subject to paying it. "They are looking for the private sector to…spit out dollars," Giacomini said of the move.

    Despite calling taxes "theft," Milei has increased the PAIS tax, imposing a 35 percent surcharge on foreign currency transactions. The measure, which effectively acts as an import tax, hinders free trade and has been exacerbated by Milei's decision to increase the exchange range. He has also raised taxes on gas and exports, including wheat (12 to 15 percent), corn (12 to 15 percent), beef (9 to 15), and flour (31 to 33 percent).

    Milei was elected on a promise of dollarizing the economy, claiming it would be "super easy" to implement. He's now backtracked. And while he has proposed to privatize 41 public companies, he can't proceed without congressional approval. While this initiative could be a positive development in some cases, it's noteworthy that Milei has excluded the energy company YPF and the national bank from his privatization agenda.

    He backtracked on a promise to eliminate the official change rate, which empowers the government to set the price of dollars. While Milei's dog Milton might not have encouraged him to support a free-floating currency exchange, the economist Milton Friedman would have advocated for it, highlighting how a fixed exchange rate caused Argentina's numerous currency devaluations. These controls have also contributed to the country's capital flight and broader economic instability.

    Currency controls distort the market, reduce competitiveness, discourage foreign investment, foster black market activity, and contribute to inflationary pressures. An alternate option would be for Argentina to embrace bitcoin as legal tender, though that seems unlikely. Recently, the non-profit Bitcoin Argentina criticized Milei for trying to regulate all aspects of crypto asset trading. Milei's government, through the National Stock Commission, also created a state agency to regulate cryptocurrencies in Argentina. Under the new regulation, entities of individuals transacting in bitcoin and other digital assets above 27 million pesos per month are given 42 days to enroll in the Registry of Virtual Asset Service Providers. According to the legislation, those who fail to register "shall refrain from performing in the country any of the activities or operations covered."

    While Milei garners media praise for achieving a government surplus, his administration has also authorized the issuance of more public debt, in contrast to his chainsaw-wielding campaign promises. "The chainsaw plan is coming. Tremble, you thieve politicians. You are going to stop stealing. You are going to have to work like honest people. Keep lying to the people, thieves," said Milei during his presidential campaign. Speaking of plagiarism, it seems that the chainsaw was also borrowed, in this case, from U.S. Senator Rand Paul (R–Ky.).

    Milei's administration garnered attention in the American media for achieving a balanced budget marked by tax increases and spending cuts. But it matters what you cut. Bureaucrats and rent-seekers—the "political caste" Milei deplores—have been spared from austerity measures. Menem recently approved a 29.5 percent increase in the salaries of congressional state employees.

    Milei promised to cut several government ministries and entertained foreign audiences with a video of him yelling "¡afuera!" or "get out!" while pulling down sticky notes with the ministries' names printed on them. Yet his actions amounted to merely renaming them "secretariats." This change has resulted in practically zero impact on spending while consolidating control in fewer hands, with nine large ministries replacing 18 smaller ones.

    Milei says correctly that the government is broke, and yet his administration is planning to acquire 24 U.S. F-16 fighter jets from the Danish government for almost $700 million—the largest military expenditure in the nation's history, despite the fact that the country has no foreign adversaries.

    Much of the cost-cutting has come from cutting Argentina's elder care entitlement. By February, the minimum pension in Argentina was projected to fall to a purchasing power even lower than during the 2001 economic crisis. Nowadays, a retiree earns roughly 46 dollars per month in a country with nearly 300 percent inflation. Vice President Victoria Villarruel criticized Milei's actions, emphasizing the issue of pensions and condemning the "liquefaction" of pensions: "I do not agree with continuing to equalize everything downwards. After contributing all his life to the pension system, I believe a pensioner should also receive a decent retirement based on the function, the work, and the time contributed. Let's go up instead of going down."

    Argentina desperately needs market liberalization to exit its devastating economic crisis, a situation made all the more urgent by an inflation rate that now surpasses Venezuela. But Milei has made too many false promises. His record so far suggests that he's a typical Latin American populist, and I worry that the failed results of his presidency will become a symbol of a right-wing model and could harm the liberty movement's credibility and progress.
    TReason is giving him the Trump treatment.
    That's a point in his favor.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  16. #763

  17. #764
    Javier Milei Update: How He's Doing Against the Bad Guys
    The Tom Woods Show: Episode 2473
    https://odysee.com/@TomWoodsTV:e/jav...'s-doing:9
    {TomWoodsTV | 03 April 2024}

    Argentina's Javier Milei has an uphill battle ahead of him to reverse the damage previous leaders have done to Argentinian economy and society, but he's clever and continues to enjoy popular support. Skot Sheller joins us for an update.

    Guest's Twitter: @BowTiedMara

    Guest's Website: Free State Project: https://www.fsp.org

    Last edited by Occam's Banana; 04-04-2024 at 11:10 AM.

  18. #765
    thanks for quality upload banana

  19. #766
    The only thing that really bothers me about Milei, at this point, are his dogs. I am a dog lover but he has to keep his separated because they'll kill each other so that's kinda like someone who has a bunch of pit bulls. I'd feel way better about him if he had a bunch of beagles.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

  20. #767
    https://twitter.com/LibertarianDuty/...03052787421261

  21. #768
    Quote Originally Posted by Judy Shelton
    ...
    Mr. Milei’s pledge to discard the peso and replace it with the American dollar was a centerpiece of his presidential campaign, although early plans to make the switch now appear to have stalled. Here is where America should be paying close attention. The significance of Argentina’s new commitment to enriching society through limited government and the free market system goes beyond merely providing ideological reaffirmation for its demoralized neighbor to the North.
    ...
    https://www.nysun.com/article/the-mi...sletter-access



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  23. #769
    Mr. Milei’s pledge to discard the peso and replace it with the American dollar was a centerpiece of his presidential campaign, although early plans to make the switch now appear to have stalled.
    Either that, or he only promised half of what you said he promised, and you made the rest up.

  24. #770

  25. #771
    Argentina is in talks with Ukraine over how it can help the war-torn nation and that includes the potential of sending military aid, President Javier Milei has revealed.

    Speaking during an interview with CNN en Español, the head of state intends to meet with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in mid-June when he embarks upon an international tour to Europe.

    Argentina's president has been vocal in his support for Zelenskyy, while the Ukrainian leader travelled to Buenos Aires to attend Milei's inauguration last December.

    Milei, 53, has been invited to attend the G7 Leaders Summit by Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni, an ideological ally with whom he also has warm relations. The summit will be held at Borgo Egnazia, in southern Italy, and takes place from June 13 to 15.

    As well as Zelenskyy, Argentina's leader intends to meet other major leaders while in Europe, including France’s Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz.

    Milei went on to reveal in the interview that Argentina’s Defence Minister Luis Petri is in talks with the Ukrainian authorities over providing assistance. He did not rule out the chance of sending military aid to the war-torn country.

    "The governments are in contact, including the defence ministers, and we will do whatever we can to help,” he said.

    Reiterating his intention to stage an international forum on the Ukraine crisis in Buenos Aires this year, Milei said Argentina wanted to know how it can “collaborate” with the Zelenskyy administration.

    https://www.batimes.com.ar/news/arge...sibility.phtml


    C'mon now. How can he even consider this??? Why is he so damn interested in Ukraine? Ukraine is one of the most corrupt countries on the planet.

    smh
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

  26. #772
    Quote Originally Posted by susano View Post
    Argentina is in talks with Ukraine over how it can help the war-torn nation and that includes the potential of sending military aid, President Javier Milei has revealed.

    Speaking during an interview with CNN en Español, the head of state intends to meet with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in mid-June when he embarks upon an international tour to Europe.

    Argentina's president has been vocal in his support for Zelenskyy, while the Ukrainian leader travelled to Buenos Aires to attend Milei's inauguration last December.

    Milei, 53, has been invited to attend the G7 Leaders Summit by Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni, an ideological ally with whom he also has warm relations. The summit will be held at Borgo Egnazia, in southern Italy, and takes place from June 13 to 15.

    As well as Zelenskyy, Argentina's leader intends to meet other major leaders while in Europe, including France’s Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz.

    Milei went on to reveal in the interview that Argentina’s Defence Minister Luis Petri is in talks with the Ukrainian authorities over providing assistance. He did not rule out the chance of sending military aid to the war-torn country.

    "The governments are in contact, including the defence ministers, and we will do whatever we can to help,” he said.

    Reiterating his intention to stage an international forum on the Ukraine crisis in Buenos Aires this year, Milei said Argentina wanted to know how it can “collaborate” with the Zelenskyy administration.

    https://www.batimes.com.ar/news/arge...sibility.phtml


    C'mon now. How can he even consider this??? Why is he so damn interested in Ukraine? Ukraine is one of the most corrupt countries on the planet.

    smh
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  27. #773
    Milei takes another step towards the military conquest of the unwilling populace of the Falklands:

    Milei said that he is currently thinking to recover the Malvinas Islands through a diplomatic avenue

    ��️ "Making a Military Base in Ushuaia is the GREATEST ACT of SOVEREIGNTY in the last 40 years, it is the FIRST STEP to think about the RECOVERY OF MALVINAS through diplomatic means"
    https://tgstat.com/channel/@tupireport/16700
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  28. #774
    Javier Milei
    Benjamin Milei-kowsky ("Netanyahu" is a Hebrew name which his father Benzion Milei-kowsky adopted for Zionist reasons)
    "When Sombart says: "Capitalism is born from the money-loan", I should like to add to this: Capitalism actually exists only in the money-loan;" - Theodor Fritsch

  29. #775


    Well done, Snowball. Take another roll of red yard out of petty cash.

  30. #776
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    Javier Milei
    Benjamin Milei-kowsky ("Netanyahu" is a Hebrew name which his father Benzion Milei-kowsky adopted for Zionist reasons)
    He does seem to take his Jewish roots seriously.
    @Swordsmyth
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster



  31. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  32. #777
    https://twitter.com/laderechadiario/...96267052814424




    By Milei's drive, Argentina moves forward in an agreement with the United States to be NATO's "global partner"
    https://derechadiario.com.ar/argenti...bal-de-la-otan
    {La Derecha Diario | 10 April 2024}

    [browser translation from Spanish - OB]

    President Javier Milei will close the deal for the purchase of US F-16 aircraft in Denmark. On the other hand, Petri will travel to Belgium to confirm the country's incorporation into the North Atlantic military alliance.

    At the direct instruction of President Javier Milei, Argentina is preparing to negotiate in Brussels an agreement to become a "global partner" of NATO, the most powerful military alliance in the world. This agreement will offer the country access to equipment, logistics, training, and a position allied with the great powers of Europe and the United States.

    The recent visit of the Commander of the Southern Command of Washington, General Laura Richardson, along with the President's next trip to Denmark and the confidential meeting to be held by Defense Minister Luis Petri in Brussels at NATO headquarters, are aimed primarily at ensuring Argentina's inclusion in that alliance.

    The decision to join NATO's global partner program involves improving the country's defensive capabilities through interoperability, being part of the international security discussion, modernizing military doctrine and improving access to equipment and information to multilaterally address the various challenges facing defense in the 21st century.

    In addition, the Minister of Defense confirmed that this decision "is President Milei's mandate to reconcile our Armed Forces, in this case with the Western, democratic and free world."

    Should Argentina be accepted definitively, it would be a status higher than that of extra-NATO ally that the country obtained during the term of President Carlos Menem. At that time, it was only agreed to enter through a unilateral agreement between Argentina and the United States, and did not involve the rest of NATO members. However, as a "global partner," Argentina would have a broader and more formalized partnership with the entire alliance.

    The Minister of Defense confirmed that there is an "advanced level" in negotiations with NATO to close the negotiations and to realize Argentina's idea as a "global partner," the step before being a full partner.

    Petri will travel next week to Brussels to NATO headquarters, accompanied by the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces, Brigadier Xavier Isaac. The minister will then meet with Milei in Denmark.

    Yesterday, the government received the deputy undersecretary of state for Latin America, Kevin Sullivan. This official, who was a prominent Chargé d'affaires of the U.S. embassy in Buenos Aires six years ago, met with the Minister of the Interior, Guillermo Francos, at the Casa Rosada. During the meeting, Argentina's strategy of joining NATO was discussed. The issue of the logistics pole Milei wants to build in Tierra del Fuego in collaboration with the United States was also addressed.

    NATO's "global partner" category, which currently has only Colombia in South America, would provide Argentina with the opportunity to establish agreements with the members of that military alliance to acquire state-of-the-art equipment for the Armed Forces, receive training, maintain common goals, carry out joint operations eventually and get help from common enemies. In this case, Russia, Iran, North Korea and China position themselves as the main enemies of NATO and the free world.

    Argentina's decision to cooperate militarily with Ukraine in its conflict with Russia is also part of this network that could facilitate the country's entry as a "global partner" of the North Atlantic alliance.

    In this way, the Milei Government demonstrates a commitment to the Armed Forces never before seen, seeking to strengthen their defensive capacity and improve their position on the geopolitical scenario at both the regional and global levels.

  33. #778
    Quote Originally Posted by susano View Post
    He does seem to take his Jewish roots seriously.
    @Swordsmyth
    Yes, he is open about "converting" to Judaism.
    That means he either was a cryptojew from a family of cryptojews all along or he is a Renegade Apostate denying Christ.
    Neither says much for being able to trust him, but the former is slightly better than the latter.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  34. #779
    https://twitter.com/laderechadiario/...96267052814424




    By Milei's drive, Argentina moves forward in an agreement with the United States to be NATO's "global partner"
    https://derechadiario.com.ar/argenti...bal-de-la-otan
    {La Derecha Diario | 10 April 2024}

    [browser translation from Spanish - OB]

    President Javier Milei will close the deal for the purchase of US F-16 aircraft in Denmark. On the other hand, Petri will travel to Belgium to confirm the country's incorporation into the North Atlantic military alliance.

    At the direct instruction of President Javier Milei, Argentina is preparing to negotiate in Brussels an agreement to become a "global partner" of NATO, the most powerful military alliance in the world. This agreement will offer the country access to equipment, logistics, training, and a position allied with the great powers of Europe and the United States.

    The recent visit of the Commander of the Southern Command of Washington, General Laura Richardson, along with the President's next trip to Denmark and the confidential meeting to be held by Defense Minister Luis Petri in Brussels at NATO headquarters, are aimed primarily at ensuring Argentina's inclusion in that alliance.

    The decision to join NATO's global partner program involves improving the country's defensive capabilities through interoperability, being part of the international security discussion, modernizing military doctrine and improving access to equipment and information to multilaterally address the various challenges facing defense in the 21st century.

    In addition, the Minister of Defense confirmed that this decision "is President Milei's mandate to reconcile our Armed Forces, in this case with the Western, democratic and free world."

    Should Argentina be accepted definitively, it would be a status higher than that of extra-NATO ally that the country obtained during the term of President Carlos Menem. At that time, it was only agreed to enter through a unilateral agreement between Argentina and the United States, and did not involve the rest of NATO members. However, as a "global partner," Argentina would have a broader and more formalized partnership with the entire alliance.

    The Minister of Defense confirmed that there is an "advanced level" in negotiations with NATO to close the negotiations and to realize Argentina's idea as a "global partner," the step before being a full partner.

    Petri will travel next week to Brussels to NATO headquarters, accompanied by the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces, Brigadier Xavier Isaac. The minister will then meet with Milei in Denmark.

    Yesterday, the government received the deputy undersecretary of state for Latin America, Kevin Sullivan. This official, who was a prominent Chargé d'affaires of the U.S. embassy in Buenos Aires six years ago, met with the Minister of the Interior, Guillermo Francos, at the Casa Rosada. During the meeting, Argentina's strategy of joining NATO was discussed. The issue of the logistics pole Milei wants to build in Tierra del Fuego in collaboration with the United States was also addressed.

    NATO's "global partner" category, which currently has only Colombia in South America, would provide Argentina with the opportunity to establish agreements with the members of that military alliance to acquire state-of-the-art equipment for the Armed Forces, receive training, maintain common goals, carry out joint operations eventually and get help from common enemies. In this case, Russia, Iran, North Korea and China position themselves as the main enemies of NATO and the free world.

    Argentina's decision to cooperate militarily with Ukraine in its conflict with Russia is also part of this network that could facilitate the country's entry as a "global partner" of the North Atlantic alliance.

    In this way, the Milei Government demonstrates a commitment to the Armed Forces never before seen, seeking to strengthen their defensive capacity and improve their position on the geopolitical scenario at both the regional and global levels.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  35. #780
    Quote Originally Posted by Occam's Banana View Post
    https://twitter.com/laderechadiario/...96267052814424




    By Milei's drive, Argentina moves forward in an agreement with the United States to be NATO's "global partner"
    https://derechadiario.com.ar/argenti...bal-de-la-otan
    {La Derecha Diario | 10 April 2024}

    [browser translation from Spanish - OB]

    President Javier Milei will close the deal for the purchase of US F-16 aircraft in Denmark. On the other hand, Petri will travel to Belgium to confirm the country's incorporation into the North Atlantic military alliance.

    At the direct instruction of President Javier Milei, Argentina is preparing to negotiate in Brussels an agreement to become a "global partner" of NATO, the most powerful military alliance in the world. This agreement will offer the country access to equipment, logistics, training, and a position allied with the great powers of Europe and the United States.

    The recent visit of the Commander of the Southern Command of Washington, General Laura Richardson, along with the President's next trip to Denmark and the confidential meeting to be held by Defense Minister Luis Petri in Brussels at NATO headquarters, are aimed primarily at ensuring Argentina's inclusion in that alliance.

    The decision to join NATO's global partner program involves improving the country's defensive capabilities through interoperability, being part of the international security discussion, modernizing military doctrine and improving access to equipment and information to multilaterally address the various challenges facing defense in the 21st century.

    In addition, the Minister of Defense confirmed that this decision "is President Milei's mandate to reconcile our Armed Forces, in this case with the Western, democratic and free world."

    Should Argentina be accepted definitively, it would be a status higher than that of extra-NATO ally that the country obtained during the term of President Carlos Menem. At that time, it was only agreed to enter through a unilateral agreement between Argentina and the United States, and did not involve the rest of NATO members. However, as a "global partner," Argentina would have a broader and more formalized partnership with the entire alliance.

    The Minister of Defense confirmed that there is an "advanced level" in negotiations with NATO to close the negotiations and to realize Argentina's idea as a "global partner," the step before being a full partner.

    Petri will travel next week to Brussels to NATO headquarters, accompanied by the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces, Brigadier Xavier Isaac. The minister will then meet with Milei in Denmark.

    Yesterday, the government received the deputy undersecretary of state for Latin America, Kevin Sullivan. This official, who was a prominent Chargé d'affaires of the U.S. embassy in Buenos Aires six years ago, met with the Minister of the Interior, Guillermo Francos, at the Casa Rosada. During the meeting, Argentina's strategy of joining NATO was discussed. The issue of the logistics pole Milei wants to build in Tierra del Fuego in collaboration with the United States was also addressed.

    NATO's "global partner" category, which currently has only Colombia in South America, would provide Argentina with the opportunity to establish agreements with the members of that military alliance to acquire state-of-the-art equipment for the Armed Forces, receive training, maintain common goals, carry out joint operations eventually and get help from common enemies. In this case, Russia, Iran, North Korea and China position themselves as the main enemies of NATO and the free world.

    Argentina's decision to cooperate militarily with Ukraine in its conflict with Russia is also part of this network that could facilitate the country's entry as a "global partner" of the North Atlantic alliance.

    In this way, the Milei Government demonstrates a commitment to the Armed Forces never before seen, seeking to strengthen their defensive capacity and improve their position on the geopolitical scenario at both the regional and global levels.
    I'm trying to think of any way to read that other than at face value. The only thing I can come up with is a cautionary move against the influence of China, which is prudent, but it's probably more a matter a matter of it being it being just what it looks like. He's pro NATO and all that that means ("rules based order"). Not what I would have expected.
    My two daughters and I were gang-raped by some of the Newcomers. It landed us in the hospital for 3 weeks as several bones were broken. I don't blame them, it was a sexual emergency and I wasn't about to go all white privilege and deny them the release they needed, especially after being stuck in a hotel for months. I see the Newcomers as family now. They are on our side and will help us stop Trump. It is a small price to pay. Anything but Trump.

    -GLP poster

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