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Thread: We can't get along EVEN on Thanksgiving...

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by 69360 View Post
    Who? So some nobodies made a stupid statement on the internet. Why should I care.
    There is a media industry which is entirely built around finding things on the internet which will offend you and showing them to you.

    It's a business model, and a very, very successful one.
    "The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality."
    -George Orwell, "Notes on nationalism"



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  3. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by 69360 View Post
    Indians and Blacks now have every opportunity for a better life.
    What makes you think its a better life? iPhones and Cheeze-Whiz?

    I suggest over the past 5000 years the quality of life among humans has gotten steadily worse, not better.



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  5. #33
    Especially on Thanksgiving.

    The idea is to destroy every bit of American culture, especially the religious parts.

    You are witnessing the attempt to do to America what Mao did to China with the Cultural Revolution.

    Every flaw in our history is to be overstated and every virtue denied and vilified.

    You can see their operatives and useful idiots engaged in it right here on the site.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  6. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Intrepid View Post
    I suggest over the past 5000 years the quality of life among humans has gotten steadily worse, not better.
    What metric do you use?
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  7. #35
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  8. #36
    Deprogram your relatives this Thanksgiving

    https://newsletters.theatlantic.com/...-thanksgiving/

    Maybe you’ll change a heart or a mind. Or not! Either way, it’s something to do besides just eat

    By Molly Jong-Fast
    NOVEMBER 24, 2021

    Some people (like my friend Tom Nichols) think that you should spend your Thanksgiving playing nice, pretending that your cousin doesn’t follow QAnon and that your uncle doesn’t believe the election was stolen and also that the Cyber Ninjas are a bunch of cucks for not uncovering voter fraud. Tom believes that Thanksgiving is a time for harmony and niceties and gratitude. I love Tom, but he’s completely wrong.

    Spending a holiday sitting around, pretending your crazy relatives aren’t crazy, is one of America’s time-honored traditions. In normal times, you could be the dog in the house-fire meme declaring, “This is fine” while taking a sip of doggy coffee, but we are not in normal times.

    Last Thanksgiving, many of us didn’t see our families, because the pandemic was raging. Now, 773,000 dead Americans later, we have vaccines and boosters. And while the unvaccinated are still dying at a pretty rapid clip, we are finally able to more safely get together with our parents and grandparents and weird cousins and uncles.

    This is your chance to deprogram them. Facebook knows its algorithm radicalizes users. This is your chance to tell your aunt that maybe the news she gets from it isn’t all that reliable. And that maybe the MAGA news network is not giving her unbiased news, either.

    Especially when it comes to vaccines, family members can actually win each other’s hearts and minds. A professor who has studied coronavirus-vaccine promotion at North Carolina State University, Stacy Wood, told The Washington Post that “the effort is worthwhile … A lot of people are convinced over time from small bits of information that trickle in.” According to a Time/Harris poll, 59 percent of people got vaccinated after a friend or family member did. You could literally save your creepy uncle’s life.

    If you actually can lead by example when it comes to vaccines, what about the other stuff?

    In May, The New York Times cited a poll in which “15 percent of Americans [said] they think that the levers of power are controlled by a cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles.” I’m no statistician—in fact I’m barely able to add and subtract; I got a D in tenth-grade math—but to me that says there’s a decent chance someone at your Thanksgiving table will be QAnon-curious or believe the Big Lie. Should you let this person rant and rave about how there were voting “irregularities” even though there weren’t irregularities? If they’re keeping up with current events through Facebook and Fox News, they’re in such an information silo that they might never hear the truth of what really happened during the 2020 election. (For the record: Nothing happened; it was a completely normal election where Joe Biden won by almost the same margin that Donald Trump won in 2016.)

    You might be the only person your uncle talks to all year who could explain to him that the Cyber Ninjas themselves found zero evidence of voter fraud. You might be the only person in the world who can sit down with your anti-vax cousin and explain to her that the vaccine won’t make her infertile and that Alex Berenson is a fraud.

    You may also be the one person who unreservedly loves Thanksgiving, but let’s be honest, for most of us a five-hour meal with relatives you see once a year is no one’s idea of a great time. Have you ever thought, This is the gauzy Hallmark-movie fantasy I’ve always longed for?

    I’ve done 43 Thanksgivings, and the best one was probably in 1997, when I was 19 and getting sober at Hazelden in Center City, Minnesota. I’m here to tell you Thanksgiving is terrible, and if you at least spend the time trying to deprogram your niece, you won’t be bored or depressed (though you might be enraged that Fox News or Infowars has convinced her Trump can “save America” from Joe Biden’s radical agenda of giving people hearing aids and free pre-K).

    Maybe it won’t work. Maybe you’ll leave Thanksgiving dinner as divided as you were when you sat down at the table five hours and 4,000 calories ago. Or maybe you’ll plant the seed, sow just a little doubt about whatever Tucker Carlson is saying now. Maybe you’ll even change a heart or a mind. Maybe you’ll bring the temperature down just a tiny bit. Or maybe you’ll need to report a relative to the FBI! Either way, it’s something to do besides just eat.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  9. #37
    You may also be the one person who unreservedly loves Thanksgiving, but let’s be honest, for most of us a five-hour meal with relatives you see once a year is no one’s idea of a great time. Have you ever thought, This is the gauzy Hallmark-movie fantasy I’ve always longed for?

    I’ve done 43 Thanksgivings, and the best one was probably in 1997, when I was 19 and getting sober at Hazelden in Center City, Minnesota. I’m here to tell you Thanksgiving is terrible,
    Ah. I see. This broad doesn't realize it, but what she's actually doing is working out her emotional insecurities in a once great magazine for all the world to see.

    Really kind of embarrassing...

  10. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    What metric do you use?
    How closely we resemble God.

    If God made us in His image (and I believe He did), and humans were originally innocent with a high degree of morality and spirituality, then I suggest over the millennia we've gotten worse not better.
    Last edited by Intrepid; 11-26-2021 at 07:14 AM.

  11. #39
    "Friendsgiving"

    A new way to reinforce the social media "reality" created and curated for each human. Echo chamber reinforcement from metadata connected "friends" instead of enduring opinions and evidence from humans living in other curated "realities".

    Virtual reality indeed.
    "Let it not be said that we did nothing."-Ron Paul

    "We have set them on the hobby-horse of an idea about the absorption of individuality by the symbolic unit of COLLECTIVISM. They have never yet and they never will have the sense to reflect that this hobby-horse is a manifest violation of the most important law of nature, which has established from the very creation of the world one unit unlike another and precisely for the purpose of instituting individuality."- A Quote From Some Old Book

  12. #40
    I had a nice thanksgiving. That does not mean I was getting along with anybody. To me the real division is the healthy against the sick.
    The medicated against the unmedicated. Good thing that most of the unmedicated are armed. I am thankful that most of the armed don't want to kill their fellow human beings. I believe that all the mass killings are funded by governments and are not generated by general public opinion. All of the single person mass killings are under some type of mind control. Gud day and gud luck



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  14. #41
    I always have a great time at family get togethers, including Thanksgivings. Yeah sometimes tensions arise but you know were a family, you work things out and enjoy the company. In fact every year in the summer about 60 to 80 of us camp on a lake for a week or two. I always look forward to that.

    Usually (not always) when someone tells me they can't stand their family, that person tends to be a jackass and I suspect that person is the cause of the problems at the table. Every now and then I'll meet a familiy that is full of jackasses. They hate family gatherings, but oddly, they are also the only group that puts up with their own shenanigans.

    Granted, there is a wide range of political philosphies in my family, but we also respect each other enough to know that we are not stupid or evil. I can't imagine going to a family gathering full of militant purple haired, soft bodied SJWs.
    ...

  15. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by TheTexan View Post
    I do hope that whatever culture eventually conquers us, they look at our culture's love of constant warfare, with equal disdain.
    If they did have such disdain they wouldn't have conquered us.

  16. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by RJB View Post
    Usually (not always) when someone tells me they can't stand their family, that person tends to be a jackass and I suspect that person is the cause of the problems at the table.
    The only exception that I know to this is when there's been some heinous (usually financial) drama.
    "The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality."
    -George Orwell, "Notes on nationalism"

  17. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by devil21 View Post
    "Friendsgiving"

    A new way to reinforce the social media "reality" created and curated for each human. Echo chamber reinforcement from metadata connected "friends" instead of enduring opinions and evidence from humans living in other curated "realities".

    Virtual reality indeed.
    My old social circle from years ago had a Friendsgiving every year, the weekend after Thanksgiving. But we all got together, originally taking shrooms but phasing those out after a few years. But still getting together and appreciating each other's presence in our lives.
    "The issue is that you to define the best candidate solely based upon what they stand for." - CaptLouAlbano

    This is the mindset trying to take hold on RPF.

    "Kelly Thomas did this to himself." - FrankRep

  18. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by belian78 View Post
    My old social circle from years ago had a Friendsgiving every year, the weekend after Thanksgiving. But we all got together, originally taking shrooms but phasing those out after a few years. But still getting together and appreciating each other's presence in our lives.
    I assume you still did the usual family gathering on the holiday though. I'd never heard the friendsgiving term until this year and heard it from multiple people using it as an excuse to skip family gatherings for friend gatherings instead. Aside from the curated reality reasoning it also sounds like an effective way to deconstruct the family unit just a bit more. Younger people don't realize that 20th century family units rarely got along completely or agree on topics (old rule: no religion or politics at the table), so it's nothing new, but you still do it to maintain a cohesive family unit. Plus it's often found out the hard way that those "friends" are the ones to disappear when you need help/support but family usually comes through.
    "Let it not be said that we did nothing."-Ron Paul

    "We have set them on the hobby-horse of an idea about the absorption of individuality by the symbolic unit of COLLECTIVISM. They have never yet and they never will have the sense to reflect that this hobby-horse is a manifest violation of the most important law of nature, which has established from the very creation of the world one unit unlike another and precisely for the purpose of instituting individuality."- A Quote From Some Old Book

  19. #46
    Thanksgiving is Awesome
    In reply to the haters. Happy holiday, everyone
    https://taibbi.substack.com/p/thanksgiving-is-awesome
    Matt Taibbi (25 November 2021)

    Thanksgiving Day is here, and as is the fashion, it’s taking a beating. “What is Thanksgiving to Indigenous People? ‘A Day of Mourning,’” writes the onetime daily Bible of American mass culture, USA Today. The Washington Post fused a clickhole headline format with white guilt to create, “This tribe helped the Pilgrims survive for their first Thanksgiving. They still regret it 400 years later.” Even the pundits who didn’t rummage in the past in search of reasons for Americans to flog themselves this week found some in the future, a la the Post’s climate-change take on Turkey Day menus:“What’s on the Thanksgiving table in a hotter, drier world?”

    MSNBC meanwhile kept things festive by reminding us, with regard to the now-infamous Pilgrims, that “Instead of bringing stuffing and biscuits, those settlers brought genocide and violence”:

    https://twitter.com/MSNBC/status/1462175533685428227


    Where’s all this headed? In the space of a generation America has gone from being a country brimming with undeserved over-confidence, to one whose intellectual culture has turned into an agonizing, apparently interminable run of performative self-flagellation.

    Whether or not to enjoy Thanksgiving is not the hard part of the American citizen’s test. Thanksgiving is awesome. Everything about it, from the mashed potatoes to the demented relatives to the pumpkin pies to the farts, is top-drawer holiday enjoyment. The only logical complaint about modern Thanksgiving involves forcing the poor Detroit Lions to play a marquee role every year. I think we can all agree that whole situation is a net minus, especially for them, no matter how funny the first fifteen minutes of those games usually are.

    But the historical self-mortification has gotten out of hand. American exceptionalism used to mean 300 million yahoos being so convinced they were a unique force for good in the world that history before 1776 was irrelevant. We’re now living through the moronic inverse: America is such a unique evil, we’re told, so much the standard-bearer for the oppression of innocent peoples everywhere, that human suffering before 1776 is hardly worth mentioning. Or before 1492, as it were, since a lot of the current fashion stems from our pseudo-intellectual class being unable suddenly to handle the revelations of one decades-old book.

    In the opening pages of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, we read the log of Christopher Columbus, who recounts the first meeting of Europeans with the native Arawaks of the Bahamas:

    They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it and cut themselves out of ignorance… With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.

    Zinn’s Columbus is a genocidal monster who not only massacred natives from The Bahamas to Haiti, and sold women and children by the thousands for “sex and labor,” but was so personally petty that he stole the reward of the poor sailor on his own ship who spotted land first, by claiming the feat himself. It’s hard to read Zinn’s account, which includes horrifying details like Indians murdering their own children to spare them the tortures of life under Spaniards, and not have a second thought or ten about the legend of the “discovery of America.”

    I found A People’s History a fascinating and enjoyable read when I first read it in college, but that was when it was a ballsy, quasi-forbidden counterfactual to official narrative, not anyone’s idea of the actual “History of the United States.” The national idea of historical reflection back then was Forrest Gump, literally a two-hour shrug. In that context, the book made sense. Decades later, in the middle of a reverse cultural mania that devours it as gospel, Zinn’s book reads like the rantings of a mental patient.

    After he finishes his tale of Columbus’s rampage through sinless indigenous cultures, Zinn contrasts it with the fables Americans of the time were all taught in school, in which “there is no bloodshed” upon the his arrival. He goes on to torch as an example the work of Harvard historian Samuel Eliot Morrison, whose Christopher Columbus, Mariner contains only a passing reference to the “cruel policy initiated by Columbus… [that] resulted in complete genocide.”

    It takes stones to write an entire book about a major historical figure and include as a throwaway line, “And by the way, he committed genocide.” Incredibly, Zinn manages to be just as bad, if not worse. Of course A People’s History was designed to be the missing case for the prosecution, a chronicle of everything the Morrisons of the world left out, but his version of five hundred years of history contains just two characters, pure villains and pure victims. You’ve heard of Alien versus Predator; the People’s History could have been titled Hitlers and Baby Seals.

    All his Europeans from Columbus on down are more or less indistinguishably monstrous, and even Abraham Lincoln and FDR are almost interchangeable capitalist tools, at most to be congratulated for being unenthusiastic oppressors. (The book in this sense reads a lot like the 1619 Project). A People’s History after its release in 1980 was often described as “radical,” but the radicalism wasn’t in the subject matter, but its maniacal sorting of people into two simplistic piles. Decades before it was fashionable, Zinn sketched out an intersectional construct that flattened much of humanity into a single interconnected mass of one-dimensional victimhood, “centering” the matrix of America’s oppressed:

    The history of any country, presented as the history of a family, conceals fierce conflicts of interest (sometimes exploding, most often repressed) between conquerors and conquered, masters and slaves, capitalists and workers, dominators and dominated in race and sex. And in such a world of conflict, a world of victims and executioners, it is the job of thinking people, as Albert Camus suggested, not to be on the side of the executioners.

    Thus, in that inevitable taking of sides which comes from selection and emphasis in history, I prefer to try to tell the story of the discovery of America from the viewpoint of the Arawaks, of the Constitution from the standpoint of the slaves, of Andrew Jackson as seen by the Cherokees…

    No matter how interesting a book he or she is able to write, any author who admits to looking out at the world and seeing only “victims and executioners” needs psychological help. Unfortunately, Zinn in this respect turned out to be a pioneer, presaging a generation of comic-book thinkers who understand things in binary terms, forever preoccupied with cramming people in neat categories of oppressors and oppressed.

    Such mental habits are the fashion now and will definitely put you in a bind on Thanksgiving. How can I eat turkey and stuffing with a smile, when Columbus massacred the Arawaks? When the English forced the Wampanoags off their land and made many convert to Christianity? When Lincoln told Horace Greeley, “If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it”?

    How? Maybe because you’re more than three years old, and don’t need fairy tales to be real in order to enjoy dinner with family and a football game?

    We don’t ask Russians how they can sit around the yelochka every New Year and open presents knowing that Ivan the Terrible used to roast prisoners in giant frying pans, or how they can smoke Belomorkanal cigarettes knowing the real White Sea canal is filled with the bones of slave laborers. I think even most MSNBC anchors would agree, that would be stupid. But we do this to ourselves all the time now, and every year it gets worse.

    All this is just a come-down from the high of Reagan-era exceptionalism. The drug has worn off and we’re realizing, in the cold light of sobriety, that we suck every bit as much as other nations. So we’re swinging, as all people with hangovers do, to an opposite extreme.

    We’ve lost touch with our real story, which is about us, not the centuries-old adventures of toffs in wigs. The Founding Fathers may have been scum, but they didn’t just steal a continent from the indigenous residents, they stole one from a British King, which is, come on, hilarious. These revolutionaries — Kurt Vonnegut called them “Sea Pirates” — then drew up a document sanctifying their own pursuit of obscene wealth, flying flags that were strikingly like “Let’s Go Brandon” in sentiment while reveling in the horror they inspired in aristocrats all over Europe. Then, in a move that secured their heist while providing the manpower they needed for expansion, they started opening their doors to castoffs, screwups, and cultists from other countries.

    Almost none of us are related to Pilgrims or Founders. Nearly all of us descended from those subsequent waves of weirdos and refugees who came from all over, some not by choice, and forged the real character of our stolen nation. Many of our ancestors had their hands forced elsewhere, from Jews in the Pale fleeing pogroms to Irish escaping famines to Armenians running from Ottoman genocides. Once they got here, they happily planted Sea Pirate flags on their front doors and set about inventing everything from cat litter to alternating current, while mostly refraining from murdering one another. It was an insane setup, but they made the whole thing work, which is a pretty amazing story even figuring in the horribleness, and really what we’re celebrating every November. You have to reduce the American experience to a few ridiculously grim variables, and remove everything from movies to rock n’ roll to monster dunks, to spend today sulking.

    Years ago, during a time in my life when I’d fled the United States to St. Petersburg, Russia with no intention of returning, my best friend was a Swiss named Daniel, with whom I’d studied at a Soviet University. Like all people from his country, Daniel was a polyglot. He spoke perfect English and Russian, but hanging out with him was disorienting, because he’d be talking like a mechanic from Baltimore and suddenly forget the word for washing machine and start miming a spin cycle. It took getting used to, but it was funny — we laughed a lot. On Thanksgiving one year, I told him I was going to the consulate for dinner. “Thanksgiving,” he said. “That’s the one where you killed all the Indians, right?”

    “Not me personally, but yes.”

    “Bring back leftovers,” he answered. I went to the consulate, which of course spared no expense in laying out a fantastic spread, but spent most of the day shooting baskets in a back lot with a group of black Marine guards. On the way out I stole a haul of turkey and cranberry sauce, which Daniel and I devoured with a bottle of vodka later that night, in one of the best Thanksgivings of my life. This holiday is about friends and family. Enjoy them today, don’t listen to the haters, and go Lions.

  20. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by devil21 View Post
    I assume you still did the usual family gathering on the holiday though. I'd never heard the friendsgiving term until this year and heard it from multiple people using it as an excuse to skip family gatherings for friend gatherings instead. Aside from the curated reality reasoning it also sounds like an effective way to deconstruct the family unit just a bit more. Younger people don't realize that 20th century family units rarely got along completely or agree on topics (old rule: no religion or politics at the table), so it's nothing new, but you still do it to maintain a cohesive family unit. Plus it's often found out the hard way that those "friends" are the ones to disappear when you need help/support but family usually comes through.
    No argument here on that. And yeah, we always got together with our families too. It's why we usually were all in the same area.
    "The issue is that you to define the best candidate solely based upon what they stand for." - CaptLouAlbano

    This is the mindset trying to take hold on RPF.

    "Kelly Thomas did this to himself." - FrankRep

  21. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by write up above
    In the opening pages of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, we read the log of Christopher Columbus, who recounts the first meeting of Europeans with the native Arawaks of the Bahamas:

    They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it and cut themselves out of ignorance… With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.

    Zinn’s Columbus is a genocidal monster who not only massacred natives from The Bahamas to Haiti, and sold women and children by the thousands for “sex and labor,” but was so personally petty that he stole the reward of the poor sailor on his own ship who spotted land first, by claiming the feat himself. It’s hard to read Zinn’s account, which includes horrifying details like Indians murdering their own children to spare them the tortures of life under Spaniards, and not have a second thought or ten about the legend of the “discovery of America.”
    Fwiw, that's probably all true. The romanticized version of discovery and conquest is usually the bs version, never mind that there's evidence that the New World was discovered long before then by Vikings and other Northern Europeans.

    His name wasn't Columbus and he was a known pirate and a J*. His financing wasn't from the Spanish crown. Kings never finance anything. The bankers finance Kings, who then convey the banker's coin of the day to the Conquestors. Coincidence that "Columbus" is close to "Columbia", which is the namesake of DC and derived from "Goddess Columbia", aka Isis/Semiramis/etc, the patron goddess of human enslavement, who happens to stand on top of the Capitol?

    Where the history ceases to matter is where the modern family connections, that endure because of the holiday, were created by the observance of it. Good write-up overall.
    Last edited by devil21; 11-27-2021 at 03:17 AM.
    "Let it not be said that we did nothing."-Ron Paul

    "We have set them on the hobby-horse of an idea about the absorption of individuality by the symbolic unit of COLLECTIVISM. They have never yet and they never will have the sense to reflect that this hobby-horse is a manifest violation of the most important law of nature, which has established from the very creation of the world one unit unlike another and precisely for the purpose of instituting individuality."- A Quote From Some Old Book



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  23. #49
    Wooooo!


    Quote Originally Posted by TheCount View Post
    ...I believe that when the government is capable of doing a thing, it will.
    Quote Originally Posted by Influenza View Post
    which one of yall fuckers wrote the "ron paul" racist news letters
    Quote Originally Posted by Dforkus View Post
    Zippy's posts are a great contribution.




    Disrupt, Deny, Deflate. Read the RPF trolls' playbook here (post #3): http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...eptive-members

  24. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthCarolinaLiberty View Post
    Wooooo!


    Celebrating indiginous peoples day with a rousing game of Cowboys and Injuns.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  25. #51
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  26. #52
    Thanksgiving is truly a Great American holiday . Taking time to give thanks and enjoying a feast of fall plenty is going to be hard to beat . Most people here now go through a fairly easy life without giving thanks enough .
    Do something Danke

  27. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Intrepid View Post
    What makes you think its a better life? iPhones and Cheeze-Whiz?

    I suggest over the past 5000 years the quality of life among humans has gotten steadily worse, not better.

    The best way to measure the quality of life objectively is to check emigration statistics.

    Oddly enough minorities tend to emigrate to racist white countries. Weird isn't it?

  28. #54
    Just wanted to point this out... Since Thanksgiving is typically the day before the biggest sales day of the year, why hold off on announcing "a New COVID variant" until this day specifically UNLESS their goal is to destroy the economy?
    1776 > 1984

    The FAILURE of the United States Government to operate and maintain an
    Honest Money System , which frees the ordinary man from the clutches of the money manipulators, is the single largest contributing factor to the World's current Economic Crisis.

    The Elimination of Privacy is the Architecture of Genocide

    Belief, Money, and Violence are the three ways all people are controlled

    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Our central bank is not privately owned.

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