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Thread: America Is Running Out of Everything

  1. #1

    Exclamation America Is Running Out of Everything

    America Is Running Out of Everything

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news...-99/ar-AAPeokg

    Derek Thompson 4 hrs ago

    Is it just me, or does it feel like America is running out of everything?

    I visited CVS last week to pick up some at-home COVID-19 tests. They’d been sold out for a week, an employee told me. So I asked about paper towels. “We’re out of those too,” he said. “Try Walgreens.” I drove to a Walgreens that had paper towels. But when I asked a pharmacist to fill some very common prescriptions, he told me the store had run out. “Try the Target up the road,” he suggested. Target’s pharmacy had the meds, but its front area was alarmingly barren, like the canned-food section of a grocery store one hour before a hurricane makes landfall.

    This is the economy now. One-hour errands are now multi-hour odysseys. Next-day deliveries are becoming day-after-next deliveries. That car part you need? It’ll take an extra week, sorry. The book you were looking for? Come back in November. The baby crib you bought? Make it December. Eyeing a new home-improvement job that requires several construction workers? Haha, pray for 2022.

    The U.S. economy isn’t yet experiencing a downturn akin to the 1970s period of stagflation. This is something different, and quite strange. Americans are settling into a new phase of the pandemic economy, in which GDP is growing but we’re also suffering from a dearth of a shocking array of things—test kits, car parts, semiconductors, ships, shipping containers, workers. This is the Everything Shortage.

    The Everything Shortage is not the result of one big bottleneck in, say, Vietnamese factories or the American trucking industry. We are running low on supplies of all kinds due to a veritable hydra of bottlenecks.

    The coronavirus pandemic has snarled global supply chains in several ways. Pandemic checks sent hundreds of billions of dollars to cabin-fevered Americans during a fallow period in the service sector. A lot of that cash has flowed to hard goods, especially home goods such as furniture and home-improvement materials. Many of these materials have to be imported from or travel through East Asia. But that region is dealing with the Delta variant, which has been considerably more deadly than previous iterations of the virus. Delta has caused several shutdowns at semiconductor factories across Asia just as demand for cars and electronics has started to pick up. As a result, these stops along the supply chain are slowing down at the very moment when Americans are demanding that they work in overdrive.

    The most dramatic expression of this snarl is the purgatory of loaded cargo containers stacked on ships bobbing off the coast of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Just as a normal traffic jam consists of too many drivers trying to use too few lanes, the traffic jam at California ports has been exacerbated by extravagant consumer demand slamming into a shortage of trucks, truckers, and port workers. Because ships can’t be unloaded, not enough empty containers are in transit to carry all of the stuff that consumers are trying to buy. So the world is getting a lesson in Econ 101: High demand plus limited supply equals prices spiraling to the moon. Before the pandemic, reserving a container that holds roughly 35,000 books cost $2,500. Now it costs $25,000.

    The container situation is even weirder than it looks. With demand surging in the United States, shipping a parcel from Shanghai to Los Angeles is currently six times more expensive than shipping one from L.A. to Shanghai. J.P. Morgan’s Michael Cembalest wrote that this has created strong incentives for container owners to ship containers to China—even if they are mostly empty—to expedite the packing and shipping of freights in Shanghai to travel east. But when containers leave Los Angeles and Long Beach empty, American-made goods that were supposed to be sent across the Pacific Ocean end up sitting around in railcars parked at West Coast ports. Since the packed railcars can’t unload their goods, they can’t go back and collect more stuff from filled warehouses in the American interior.

    And what about the truckers who are needed to drive materials between warehouses, ports, stores, and houses? They’re dealing with a multidimensional shortage too. Supply-chain woes have backed up orders for parts, such as resin for roof caps and vinyl for seats. But there’s also a crucial lack of people to actually drive the rigs. The Minnesota Trucking Association estimates that the country has a shortage of about 60,000 drivers, due to longtime recruitment issues, early retirements, and COVID-canceled driving-school classes.

    In short, supply chains depend on containers, ports, railroads, warehouses, and trucks. Every stage of this international assembly line is breaking down in its own unique way. When the global supply chain works, it’s like a beautifully invisible system of dominoes clicking forward. Today’s omnishambles is a reminder that dominoes can fall backwards too.

    And then there’s the labor market. In the U.S., job openings have hit record highs in restaurants, hotels, and other leisure and hospitality sectors. But companies are struggling to fill these roles—and to keep factories and some other businesses operating at full capacity when Delta infections roll through.

    You can see these problems from a variety of angles. From workers’ perspective, unemployment insurance and several rounds of stimulus have allowed laid-off workers to be picky about jobs, instead of desperately lunging for the first paycheck available. That doesn’t sound like such a bad thing. But from many employers’ perspective, government programs have exacerbated a terrible labor shortage. Staffing up a business has become difficult. The result, from consumers’ perspective, is more of the same Everything Shortage. Since finding, hiring, and training hundreds of thousands of people in new roles at the same time is hard during a pandemic, we should all expect a bit of slowness across the service sector for a while—a bit more time for that cappuccino, a bit longer of a wait for that appetizer, a bit of confusion at the convenience store when you ask where the nail-polish remover is and the new employee who had to Zoom in for her training program needs a moment to remember the aisle numbers.

    Finally, as if those slowdowns weren’t enough, there’s the mail. As of this month, the U.S. Postal Service is reducing its use of air transportation to save money. The USPS estimates that deliveries outside your local area will likely be delayed by one or two days. But as we’ve seen, relying on rail and truck means leaning on systems that are dealing with their own mess.

    This has not yet added up to a recession. But it portends a massively frustrating holiday-shopping period, especially for households with a habit of buying presents at the last minute. “I’ve been doing this for 43 years and never seen it this bad,” Isaac Larian, the founder and CEO of the toy maker MGA Entertainment, told Bloomberg. “Everything that can go wrong is going wrong at the same time.” USPS has already announced price hikes for the winter holidays. To avoid paying those surcharges and suffering the yuletide wrath of disappointed children, the recommended course of action is clear: If you want it by December 25, start placing those orders soon. Everyone complains when stores start playing carols and advertising holiday sales in October. This year, “Christmas creep” is your best shopping strategy. Either that, or prepare the kids to celebrate Christmas morning some time in January.

    How will the Everything Shortage be resolved? One possibility is that Americans adopt a sustainable, ascetic, and homespun lifestyle that reduces our dependency on goods that activate the global supply chain. If you can seriously envision such a world, I envy your gift of imagination.

    The best solution to the Everything Shortage is to have a policy to make more of just about everything. Containers, which carry more than 90 percent of the world’s traded goods, are overwhelmingly manufactured in China. Why doesn’t America make more? Car parts, semiconductors, and home goods have been offshored, making the U.S. sorely reliant on overseas factories. Why can’t America make more? At-home COVID-19 tests, which could illuminate household infections and prevent community spread, were only just authorized by the FDA, almost two years into this pandemic. Why hasn’t America made more?

    For decades, many U.S. companies moved manufacturing overseas, taking advantage of cheaper labor and cheaper materials across the oceans. In normal times, America benefits from global trade, and the price of offshoring is borne by the unlucky few in deindustrialized regions. But the pandemic and the supply-chain breakdowns are a reminder that the decline of manufacturing can be felt more broadly during a crisis when we run out of, well, damn near everything. That’s why Joe Biden's Build Back Better plan includes billions of dollars to reshore manufacturing, invest in basic research, and beef up domestic supply chains.

    Our dearth of manufactured parts and containers is part of a broader crisis of manufactured scarcity in America. A protectionist and anti-growth instinct runs through government, yielding not only a flat-footed CDC and a tardy FDA but also sharp restrictions on housing construction, immigration, and the licensing of new professionals and tradespeople. Focusing on the redistribution of income and goods is natural for today’s progressives, who tend to emphasize the virtue of equality. One lesson of the Everything Shortage is: You cannot redistribute what isn’t created in the first place. The best equality agenda begins with an abundance agenda.


    Today’s crisis is an opportunity to emphasize a new philosophy of what The New York Times’ Ezra Klein calls “supply-side progressivism,” which sees value in this across-the-board abundance. This approach might start by prioritizing policies that reduce the cost of housing and health care, and reshoring the production of materials that we deem essential to national security during a pandemic or an unrelated supply-chain calamity. Decades from now, we might look at the legacy of the pandemic, and see that it took a global crisis of choke points to teach us that real progress begins by removing the choke points at home.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov



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  3. #2
    The way this should be rectified is by prices rising faster than they have been. Something is preventing that and keeping prices artificially lower than they would otherwise be, possibly price gouging laws, I'm not sure.
    There is nothing to fear from globalism, free trade and a single worldwide currency, but a globalism where free trade is competitively subsidized by each nation, a continuous trade war is dictated by the WTO, and the single currency is pure fiat, fear is justified. That type of globalism is destined to collapse into economic despair, inflationism and protectionism and managed by resurgent militant nationalism.
    Ron Paul
    Congressional Record (March 13, 2001)

  4. #3
    I just went in for an oil change at the Toyota dealership where I bought my truck.

    2 years ago they had so many vehicles on the lot that they had to make use of some of the lanes between rows of cars for extra inventory parking space. (made it a b*tch to navigate, and if you wanted to test drive something they had to move 2 or 3 cars out of the way)

    This week when I went in there were NO vehicles in the showroom on display, and the parking lot was nearly empty.

    The customer rep guy told me the only thing keeping them in business right now is the service department.
    Quote Originally Posted by timosman View Post
    This is getting silly.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    It started silly.
    T.S. Eliot's The Hollow Men

    Some of you still watch the news, and it shows.

    "One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors." - Plato

    We Are Running Out of Time - Mini Me

  5. #4
    The best solution to the Everything Shortage is to have a policy to make more of just about everything. Containers, which carry more than 90 percent of the world’s traded goods, are overwhelmingly manufactured in China. Why doesn’t America make more? Car parts, semiconductors, and home goods have been offshored, making the U.S. sorely reliant on overseas factories. Why can’t America make more? At-home COVID-19 tests, which could illuminate household infections and prevent community spread, were only just authorized by the FDA, almost two years into this pandemic. Why hasn’t America made more?

    For decades, many U.S. companies moved manufacturing overseas, taking advantage of cheaper labor and cheaper materials across the oceans. In normal times, America benefits from global trade, and the price of offshoring is borne by the unlucky few in deindustrialized regions. But the pandemic and the supply-chain breakdowns are a reminder that the decline of manufacturing can be felt more broadly during a crisis when we run out of, well, damn near everything. That’s why Joe Biden's Build Back Better plan includes billions of dollars to reshore manufacturing, invest in basic research, and beef up domestic supply chains.

    Our dearth of manufactured parts and containers is part of a broader crisis of manufactured scarcity in America. A protectionist and anti-growth instinct runs through government, yielding not only a flat-footed CDC and a tardy FDA but also sharp restrictions on housing construction, immigration, and the licensing of new professionals and tradespeople. Focusing on the redistribution of income and goods is natural for today’s progressives, who tend to emphasize the virtue of equality. One lesson of the Everything Shortage is: You cannot redistribute what isn’t created in the first place. The best equality agenda begins with an abundance agenda.
    That is the most hysterical three paragraphs of Marxist media organ bull$#@! I have read in months.

    Not because the basic premise is incorrect, it is not, it is spot on.

    It's because for four years you had a president that was doing everything in his power to do exactly that, and in many cases, oil for example, his policies worked.

    And all you people in the clown show could do is hound, harass, impeach and obstruct in any way you could.

    And now Resident Biden is going "Build Back Better" with a couple billion out of 3.5 trillion dollars in new government borrowing?

    How's he gonna do that, huh?

    With government mandated "trans queeer sensitivity" training?

    Government mandated "colored people awareness" education?

    Clowns, every last one of you babbling idiots.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Invisible Man View Post
    The way this should be rectified is by prices rising faster than they have been. Something is preventing that and keeping prices artificially lower than they would otherwise be, possibly price gouging laws, I'm not sure.
    That assumes that there is some sort of supply out there, and if you pay enough, you can get your hands on some of, whatever.

    That is not the case.

    In many instances, like the automotive chip situation, where production has been outsourced and consolidated, there are none to be had, at any price.

    This was one of the main problems that continually plagued production in the old USSR. Everything was consolidated into One Giant Facility. Great for central planning purposes, it was the only way to even make it work in a half assed fashion. Terrible for cost efficiency and even worse for supply reliability.

    As the whole world sinks further into Soviet Stupidity, you're seeing more and more of this.

    Instead of a free market model of localized, smaller and vigorously competing enterprises.

    Granted, give enough upward pressure on price and sooner or later somebody will build a new plant to manufacture chips or what have you.

    But that doesn't happen overnight, that can take years to get on line.
    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 10-07-2021 at 09:32 AM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by nobody's_hero View Post
    I just went in for an oil change at the Toyota dealership where I bought my truck.

    2 years ago they had so many vehicles on the lot that they had to make use of some of the lanes between rows of cars for extra inventory parking space. (made it a b*tch to navigate, and if you wanted to test drive something they had to move 2 or 3 cars out of the way)

    This week when I went in there were NO vehicles in the showroom on display, and the parking lot was nearly empty.

    The customer rep guy told me the only thing keeping them in business right now is the service department.
    I drove by one of the largest Ford dealers in the state the other day.

    I thought they had gone out of business, the lot was so empty.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    That assumes that there is some sort of supply out there, and if you pay enough, you can get your hands on some of, whatever.
    That doesn't have to be the case because of two things: 1. at higher prices the existing supply won't run out so fast because not as many people will buy it; and 2. the higher prices will incentivize more production of additional supply--it may not exist now, but it will get made once the incentive is high enough, and had prices been increasing naturally this would have already been happening too.
    There is nothing to fear from globalism, free trade and a single worldwide currency, but a globalism where free trade is competitively subsidized by each nation, a continuous trade war is dictated by the WTO, and the single currency is pure fiat, fear is justified. That type of globalism is destined to collapse into economic despair, inflationism and protectionism and managed by resurgent militant nationalism.
    Ron Paul
    Congressional Record (March 13, 2001)

  9. #8
    It is the greed of the elites monopolies. Overseas slave labor and lax environmental laws, to pay for insane CEO salaries and packages.

    Destroy the elites monopolies and small/medium business will be able to compete to build here again.

    Everything that has happened and is currently wrong with this nation is caused by the gross immorality of the elites that look at the people as nothing more than cattle.
    * See my visitor message area for caveats related to my posting history here.
    * Also, I have effectively retired from all social media including posting here and are basically opting out of anything to do with national politics or this country on federal or state level and rather focusing locally. I may stop by from time to time to discuss philosophy on a general level related to Libertarian schools of thought and application in the real world.



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  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by kahless View Post
    It is the greed of the elites monopolies. Overseas slave labor and lax environmental laws, to pay for insane CEO salaries and packages.

    Destroy the elites monopolies and small/medium business will be able to compete to build here again.

    Everything that has happened and is currently wrong with this nation is caused by the gross immorality of the elites that look at the people as nothing more than cattle.
    I hate to keep driving this point home but... it is because we, as a nation, have turned our backs on God. At some point you'll have to serve somebody, as Bob Dylan sang, that choice is and individual choice.
    “The spirits of darkness are now among us. We have to be on guard so that we may realize what is happening when we encounter them and gain a real idea of where they are to be found. The most dangerous thing you can do in the immediate future will be to give yourself up unconsciously to the influences which are definitely present.” ~ Rudolf Steiner

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by nobody's_hero View Post
    I just went in for an oil change at the Toyota dealership where I bought my truck.

    2 years ago they had so many vehicles on the lot that they had to make use of some of the lanes between rows of cars for extra inventory parking space. (made it a b*tch to navigate, and if you wanted to test drive something they had to move 2 or 3 cars out of the way)

    This week when I went in there were NO vehicles in the showroom on display, and the parking lot was nearly empty.

    The customer rep guy told me the only thing keeping them in business right now is the service department.
    I have an novel idea. How about someone manufacture a barebones vehicle without bluetooth, 12 airbags, 5 LED TV screens, 5 climate control zones, tire pressure sensors, anti-lock brakes, etc. etc. etc.

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    I have an novel idea. How about someone manufacture a barebones vehicle without bluetooth, 12 airbags, 5 LED TV screens, 5 climate control zones, tire pressure sensors, anti-lock brakes, etc. etc. etc.
    Not legal.

    Unless it's a motorcycle.

    By the way, a three wheeled car is legally a motorcycle...
    "Stupidity got us into this mess. Why can't it get us out?"--Will Rogers

    "All I know is what I read in the newspapers, and that's an alibi for my ignorance."--Will Rogers

  14. #12
    It's because everything comes from China and that supply chain is still completely $#@!ed
    It's all about taking action and not being lazy. So you do the work, whether it's fitness or whatever. It's about getting up, motivating yourself and just doing it.
    - Kim Kardashian

    Donald Trump / Trump Jr 2024!!!!

  15. #13
    Still have plenty of Netflix tho
    It's all about taking action and not being lazy. So you do the work, whether it's fitness or whatever. It's about getting up, motivating yourself and just doing it.
    - Kim Kardashian

    Donald Trump / Trump Jr 2024!!!!

  16. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    Not legal.

    Unless it's a motorcycle.

    By the way, a three wheeled car is legally a motorcycle...
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid." - Valery Legasov

  17. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    I hate to keep driving this point home but... it is because we, as a nation, have turned our backs on God. At some point you'll have to serve somebody, as Bob Dylan sang, that choice is and individual choice.
    Trickle down immorality.
    * See my visitor message area for caveats related to my posting history here.
    * Also, I have effectively retired from all social media including posting here and are basically opting out of anything to do with national politics or this country on federal or state level and rather focusing locally. I may stop by from time to time to discuss philosophy on a general level related to Libertarian schools of thought and application in the real world.

  18. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    That is the most hysterical three paragraphs of Marxist media organ bull$#@! I have read in months.

    Not because the basic premise is incorrect, it is not, it is spot on.

    It's because for four years you had a president that was doing everything in his power to do exactly that, and in many cases, oil for example, his policies worked.

    And all you people in the clown show could do is hound, harass, impeach and obstruct in any way you could.

    And now Resident Biden is going "Build Back Better" with a couple billion out of 3.5 trillion dollars in new government borrowing?

    How's he gonna do that, huh?

    With government mandated "trans queeer sensitivity" training?

    Government mandated "colored people awareness" education?

    Clowns, every last one of you babbling idiots.
    And immigration. The solution to too many people chasing too few goods is always more immigration. Housing was mentioned too. More immigration solves that too. Too few vehicles for sale, used or new? More immigration solves that. Immigration solves everything.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Pharma-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul

    Proponent of real science.
    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.



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  20. #17
    In Soviet Amerika, the "everything shortage" is a feature, not a bug.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Pharma-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul

    Proponent of real science.
    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  21. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by TheTexan View Post
    Still have plenty of Netflix tho
    No better way to escape from dystopia reality than to endlessly watch dystopia porn on your favorite streaming device.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Pharma-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul

    Proponent of real science.
    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  22. #19
    There's more going on than just a shipping backup from Asia. If that was true, there wouldn't be a "trucking shortage." You would be able to easily get domestic products shipped. If ports don't have enough dock workers to unload ships, there would be an excess amount of trucks to make other deliveries. Yet, somehow you can't get locally grown potatoes delivered anymore causing a "fry shortage."

    Just like the argue that the Rona is responsible for everything is a distraction, so are these shipping issues. There's something way bigger going on. The house of cards is collapsing. We're used to be able to buy whatever we wanted for our federal reserve IOUs. Now, that those same products can be sold elsewhere, for something besides fed coupons, we're just getting the table scraps.

    Like it was said above, price increases are likely being blocked, so end up with a shortage. It's time to pay the Piper. Hopefully everyone has some good backup supplies. This isn't getting better anytime soon.

  23. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Invisible Man View Post
    That doesn't have to be the case because of two things: 1. at higher prices the existing supply won't run out so fast because not as many people will buy it; and 2. the higher prices will incentivize more production of additional supply--it may not exist now, but it will get made once the incentive is high enough, and had prices been increasing naturally this would have already been happening too.
    I would wager that auto manufacturers had already ordered their chips well in advance. They may have even paid. Are you suggesting that prices can be raised retroactively on items that have already been ordered or paid for?
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Pharma-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul

    Proponent of real science.
    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  24. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt4Liberty View Post
    There's more going on than just a shipping backup from Asia. If that was true, there wouldn't be a "trucking shortage." You would be able to easily get domestic products shipped. If ports don't have enough dock workers to unload ships, there would be an excess amount of trucks to make other deliveries. Yet, somehow you can't get locally grown potatoes delivered anymore causing a "fry shortage."

    Just like the argue that the Rona is responsible for everything is a distraction, so are these shipping issues. There's something way bigger going on. The house of cards is collapsing. We're used to be able to buy whatever we wanted for our federal reserve IOUs. Now, that those same products can be sold elsewhere, for something besides fed coupons, we're just getting the table scraps.

    Like it was said above, price increases are likely being blocked, so end up with a shortage. It's time to pay the Piper. Hopefully everyone has some good backup supplies. This isn't getting better anytime soon.
    I'd guess the single biggest contributor to this is government (globally), but more specifically to COVID shutdowns and new government incentives for people to not work.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Pharma-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul

    Proponent of real science.
    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  25. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt4Liberty View Post
    There's more going on than just a shipping backup from Asia. If that was true, there wouldn't be a "trucking shortage." You would be able to easily get domestic products shipped. If ports don't have enough dock workers to unload ships, there would be an excess amount of trucks to make other deliveries. Yet, somehow you can't get locally grown potatoes delivered anymore causing a "fry shortage."

    Just like the argue that the Rona is responsible for everything is a distraction, so are these shipping issues. There's something way bigger going on. The house of cards is collapsing. We're used to be able to buy whatever we wanted for our federal reserve IOUs. Now, that those same products can be sold elsewhere, for something besides fed coupons, we're just getting the table scraps.

    Like it was said above, price increases are likely being blocked, so end up with a shortage. It's time to pay the Piper. Hopefully everyone has some good backup supplies. This isn't getting better anytime soon.
    You can't have thousands of local farms across the country close year after year to be replaced by real estate developments and expect all agricultural products to always be available through a handful of monopolies. ​Many of which are importing from outside the country.
    * See my visitor message area for caveats related to my posting history here.
    * Also, I have effectively retired from all social media including posting here and are basically opting out of anything to do with national politics or this country on federal or state level and rather focusing locally. I may stop by from time to time to discuss philosophy on a general level related to Libertarian schools of thought and application in the real world.

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian4Liberty View Post
    I'd guess the single biggest contributor to this is government, but more specifically to COVID shutdowns and new government incentives for people to not work.
    No one wants to be a mindless drone working for a pittance for a handful of elitist immoral Billionaires that will discard their workforce on a whim. The elites always point the finger at everyone else for their mess. People used to have a loyalty to their employer, they were taken care of with a pension and sometimes work for them their whole life. You can't say that now since the elites don't give a damn about anyone but themselves.

    The young people are seeing the country they were left for what it is. The crumbs called government incentives not to work as a cause is their propaganda to cover for the mess of a country they gave us.
    * See my visitor message area for caveats related to my posting history here.
    * Also, I have effectively retired from all social media including posting here and are basically opting out of anything to do with national politics or this country on federal or state level and rather focusing locally. I may stop by from time to time to discuss philosophy on a general level related to Libertarian schools of thought and application in the real world.

  27. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    Not legal.

    Unless it's a motorcycle.

    By the way, a three wheeled car is legally a motorcycle...
    Ding! Ding! $#@! a bunch of fatwahs. If available I'd buy a Toyota Hilux tomorrow. But, Chicken Tax. Too bad they can't be made right here in the good ole U.S.A.



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  29. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    That is the most hysterical three paragraphs of Marxist media organ bull$#@! I have read in months.

    I guess you missed this one.

    You Know Who Else Opposed Vaccine Mandates? Hitler.

    https://jacobinmag.com/2021/09/vacci...ulation-policy
    "He's talkin' to his gut like it's a person!!" -me
    "dumpster diving isn't professional." - angelatc
    "You don't need a medical degree to spot obvious bullshit, that's actually a separate skill." -Scott Adams
    "When you are divided, and angry, and controlled, you target those 'different' from you, not those responsible [controllers]" -Q

    "Each of us must choose which course of action we should take: education, conventional political action, or even peaceful civil disobedience to bring about necessary changes. But let it not be said that we did nothing." - Ron Paul

    "Paul said "the wave of the future" is a coalition of anti-authoritarian progressive Democrats and libertarian Republicans in Congress opposed to domestic surveillance, opposed to starting new wars and in favor of ending the so-called War on Drugs."

  30. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Invisible Man View Post
    The way this should be rectified is by prices rising faster than they have been. Something is preventing that and keeping prices artificially lower than they would otherwise be, possibly price gouging laws, I'm not sure.
    Prices are sticky. Sellers try not to shock their buyers, so they’ll raise prices slowly. Add that up and down the chain and you’ll see slower inflation than what we should. Don’t worry, though, they’ll catch up soon enough.
    "And now that the legislators and do-gooders have so futilely inflicted so many systems upon society, may they finally end where they should have begun: May they reject all systems, and try liberty; for liberty is an acknowledgment of faith in God and His works." - Bastiat

    "It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere." - Voltaire

  31. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptUSA View Post
    Prices are sticky. Sellers try not to shock their buyers, so they’ll raise prices slowly. Add that up and down the chain and you’ll see slower inflation than what we should. Don’t worry, though, they’ll catch up soon enough.
    They'll do what they've always done. Put an inflated on their product above their price point for profit then put up an "on sale" sign showing a 20% discount. "Today Only!"

    There's a reason the Dollar Store is becoming a Tree Fiddy Store. It ain't because they are offering better products.

  32. #28
    The coronavirus pandemic has snarled global supply chains in several ways.
    Government meddling has "snarled global supply chains" nothing more.

  33. #29
    Gee, it's almost like capital has structure, or something.

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  34. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptUSA View Post
    Prices are sticky. Sellers try not to shock their buyers, so they’ll raise prices slowly. Add that up and down the chain and you’ll see slower inflation than what we should. Don’t worry, though, they’ll catch up soon enough.
    Lately where I live they are shocking me. Every week it has been up across the board when I go to the grocery stores. Even McDonalds stuff I buy went up another 70 cents this week. Fast food is so expensive here it is now a luxury item. I used to go the mall food court chains for really cheap food. Only a few years ago I was surprised at how cheap it was and how much I was saving. Now I consider it a luxury eat out due to how expensive it is to eat there.

    The fed should be raising interest rates to lower inflation but of course they are not since they don't give a $#@! about the people. Only protecting the elite class.
    * See my visitor message area for caveats related to my posting history here.
    * Also, I have effectively retired from all social media including posting here and are basically opting out of anything to do with national politics or this country on federal or state level and rather focusing locally. I may stop by from time to time to discuss philosophy on a general level related to Libertarian schools of thought and application in the real world.

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