Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Effeminacy Is Not Working for the Christian Church

  1. #1

    Exclamation Effeminacy Is Not Working for the Christian Church

    Effeminacy Is Not Working for the Christian Church

    https://www.intellectualtakeout.org/...istian-church/

    By Annie Holmquist

    Sitting in a pew last summer, waiting for a small funeral service to start, I saw a young woman walk to the podium and begin to speak. To my surprise, she introduced herself as the minister who would be conducting the service, and then she began to lead those gathered to remember the departed through the songs, prayers, and eulogizing typical of funerals.

    While the presence of this female minister initially came as a surprise, further consideration led me to realize that her presence was simply a natural consequence of the women’s liberation movement and the heightened emphasis on empathetic feelings in today’s society. Somewhere along the line, we got the idea that Christianity is a soft, nurturing religion. By those standards, the presence of a woman in the pulpit seems the most natural thing in the world.

    Yet is such a course really working for the Christian church? A recent article from Christianity Today suggests otherwise.

    Citing the steady rise of religious “nones”—those individuals who claim no affiliation with any religion—author Ryan Burge claims that individuals without a religious affiliation have risen from roughly 5 percent in the early 1970s, to almost 25 percent in recent years. Burge posits that these numbers are not as dire as they seem. Many of the “nones” should really be labeled “somes,” for they attend church occasionally and still entertain religious thoughts, such as belief in God.

    Burge closes his article by quoting Wheaton College professor Ed Stetzer, who summarized the “nones’” problem by saying “'It would… be a mistake to think church as usual will appeal to the nones.’”

    “Of course!” many would say. “This is exactly why church needs to become fresh, new, and original! Stop being so hard on sin! Become more nurturing!”

    The only problem is that the church has been trying to be “new, fresh, and original”—by implementing feel-good, politically correct Christianity which embraces feminism and other trendy philosophies—throughout the years depicted in the chart above, years in which the “nones” were steadily rising. In essence, Christianity has been perverted and now presents itself as something it is not.

    That something is what scholar and writer Anthony Esolen would likely call effeminate Christianity. Writing in the February issue of Chronicles, Esolen describes the scene in modern day churches quite accurately:

    Christian men are called to fight. Yet the most common hymnals in Roman Catholic churches in the United States contain no fighting hymns; no ‘Soldiers of Christ, Arise,’ no ‘Rise Up, O Men of God.’ Similarly, the liberal Protestant denominations and their pastorellas have reduced truth in doctrine to having the right sentiments; if masculine men fall away from the faith as a result, so much the more comfortable the services will be.

    Yet such demasculinization runs counter to the roots of Christianity. Esolen cites the apostle Paul, who, despite enduring much hardship, did “not beg for pity” and play the victim as the modern, feminized church often seems to do. Instead, Paul was a “fighter,” even using masculine, warlike analogies in his writings, one of the most famous being the passage on the “armor of God.”

    Could there be a connection between the trends Esolen describes and the dramatic rise of religious “nones” in recent years?

    Think about it for a moment. Christianity, by its very teachings, is strong, masculine, and even warlike in its descriptions. Its aim is to stand against the devil and fight for Christ and the truth. It is not supposed to be comfortable. Yet in recent decades Christian churches have gone out of their way to diminish these warlike metaphors, choosing to be soft, soothing, and empathetic instead. Such traits are valuable, but when emphasized solely, they turn Christianity into a faith of weaklings. Who is attracted to that?

    Certainly not men and boys, who have inborn desires to stand strong, to fight, and to protect. As men and boys become disenchanted with Christianity and fall away, the family and faith community—two of the core building blocks of society—weaken and collapse as well.

    If Christians want to rebuild and bring the “nones” back to church, then perhaps it’s time to try something beyond feel-good sermons and feminized emotional appeals.

    Perhaps it’s time for churches to go back to the roots of their own religion and reject today’s trendy, effeminate Christianity.
    Where they have burned books, they will end in burning human beings. - Heinrich Heine 1823



  2. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  3. #2
    There were many women who exhibited leadership in both the Old and New Testaments:



    Exodus 15:20: 20 Miriam, the sister of Aaron was a prophetess and one of the triad of leaders of Israel during the Exodus from Egypt.


    Judges 4 & 5: Deborah, a prophet-judge, headed the army of ancient Israel.



    2 Kings 22:14; 2 Chronicles 34:22 Huldah, a prophet, verified the authenticity of the "Book of the Law of the Lord given through Moses." She triggered a religious renewal.



    Acts 9:36 The author of Luke referred to a female disciple by her Aramaic name Tabitha, who was also known by her Greek name Dorcas. She became sick had died; Peter brought her back to life.



    Acts 21:8: Philip the evangelist had four unmarried daughters who were prophets.



    Philippians 4:2: Paul refers to two women, Euodia and Syntyche, as coworkers who were active evangelicals, spreading the gospel.



    Romans 16:1: Paul refers to Phoebe as a minister (diakonos) of the church at Cenchrea. Some translations say deaconess; others try to obscure her position by mistranslating it as "servant" or "helper".
    “The spirits of darkness are now among us. We have to be on guard so that we may realize what is happening when we encounter them and gain a real idea of where they are to be found. The most dangerous thing you can do in the immediate future will be to give yourself up unconsciously to the influences which are definitely present.” ~ Rudolf Steiner

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    Romans 16:1: Paul refers to Phoebe as a minister (diakonos) of the church at Cenchrea. Some translations say deaconess; others try to obscure her position by mistranslating it as "servant" or "helper".

    Why do you consider "servant" or "helper" to be mistranslations of the Greek word diakonos?

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Invisible Man View Post
    Why do you consider "servant" or "helper" to be mistranslations of the Greek word diakonos?
    Because she wasn't a 'servant' or 'helper' to Paul, and it is misleading. She was a minister for God.
    “The spirits of darkness are now among us. We have to be on guard so that we may realize what is happening when we encounter them and gain a real idea of where they are to be found. The most dangerous thing you can do in the immediate future will be to give yourself up unconsciously to the influences which are definitely present.” ~ Rudolf Steiner

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    Because she wasn't a 'servant' or 'helper' to Paul, and it is misleading. She was a minister for God.
    Paul doesn't call her a diakonos of God. He calls her a diakonos of the church at Cenchreae. And even if he did call her a diakonos of God, I have trouble seeing why it would be wrong to translate that as "servant." He often refers to himself and others as servants of God. When you say that it has to be translated "minister" and that "servant" and "helper" are mistranslations, it seems like you're implying that the word connotes some kind of formal leadership position (granted, the word "minister" itself can also just be a synonym for "servant" depending on the context--so I'm not saying that's a mistranslation). The word may sometimes be used for people in formal leadership positions. But there's nothing in the word itself that requires that. Notice that in almost all of the 28 occurrences of the word in the New Testament, only a few of them refer to the title of an official church office (i.e. a "deacon"). The rest of the occurrences take a more generic sense.
    https://www.stepbible.org/?q=version...ay=INTERLEAVED
    Last edited by Invisible Man; 02-26-2021 at 08:26 AM.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Invisible Man View Post
    Paul doesn't call her a diakonos of God. He calls her a diakonos of the church at Cenchreae. And even if he did call her a diakonos of God, I have trouble seeing why it would be wrong to translate that as "servant." He often refers to himself and others as servants of God. When you say that it has to be translated "minister" and that "servant" and "helper" are mistranslations, it seems like you're implying that the word connotes some kind of formal leadership position (granted, the word "minister" itself can also just be a synonym for "servant" depending on the context--so I'm not saying that's a mistranslation). The word may sometimes be used for people in formal leadership positions. But there's nothing in the word itself that requires that. Notice that in almost all of the 28 occurrences of the word in the New Testament, only a few of them refer to the title of an official church office (i.e. a "deacon"). The rest of the occurrences take a more generic sense.
    https://www.stepbible.org/?q=version...ay=INTERLEAVED
    Even by today's standard people do not look at "deacon" as being a minister of the church. As the above article insinuates. So much gets lost in translation and generational words.

    NIV translate:

    I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a deacon[a][b] of the church in Cenchreae.

    ESV translate:

    I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a servant[a] of the church at Cenchreae,

    Darby translation:

    But I commend to you Phoebe, our sister, who is minister of the assembly which is in Cenchrea;


    Christian Standard Bible:

    I commend to you our sister Phoebe, who is a servant[a] of the church in Cenchreae.

    American Standard Version:

    I commend unto you Phoebe our sister, who is a [a]servant of the church that is at Cenchreae:

    Living Bible:

    1-2 Phoebe, a dear Christian woman from the town of Cenchreae, will be coming to see you soon.
    “The spirits of darkness are now among us. We have to be on guard so that we may realize what is happening when we encounter them and gain a real idea of where they are to be found. The most dangerous thing you can do in the immediate future will be to give yourself up unconsciously to the influences which are definitely present.” ~ Rudolf Steiner

  8. #7
    It shall not be this way among you.

    If there is an Authoritarian Hierarchy,, it is not of God. it is the continued error of Nimrod.

    But Jesus called them aside and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their superiors exercise authority over them. It shall not be this way among you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first among you must be your slave—…

    Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.


    Don't follow the leaders. don't try to be one. That is the Error of Nimrod, and the Way of the World.
    Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.
    Ron Paul 2004

    Registered Ron Paul supporter # 2202
    It's all about Freedom

  9. #8



  10. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Working Poor View Post
    Praise God and pass the Ammunition
    If it is possible on your part, live at peace with everyone.

    Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.
    Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.
    Ron Paul 2004

    Registered Ron Paul supporter # 2202
    It's all about Freedom

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by pcosmar View Post
    If it is possible on your part, live at peace with everyone.

    Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.
    If possible yea if not pass the ammunition. Always praise God though no ifs, ands, or buttts

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Working Poor View Post
    If possible yea if not pass the ammunition. Always praise God though no ifs, ands, or buttts
    Those were ammo.
    Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.
    Ron Paul 2004

    Registered Ron Paul supporter # 2202
    It's all about Freedom



Similar Threads

  1. Fasting in the Christian Church
    By TER in forum Peace Through Religion
    Replies: 251
    Last Post: 02-26-2017, 11:34 PM
  2. St. Athanasius - a Saint of the Christian Church
    By TER in forum Peace Through Religion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 06-04-2015, 09:36 PM
  3. Caller Christian....still working...lol
    By Xchange in forum Ron Paul Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-08-2012, 10:51 PM
  4. Ok Christian Church, what gave us the right to go to war?
    By hope7134 in forum World News & Affairs
    Replies: 125
    Last Post: 08-17-2008, 03:50 PM
  5. Anyone working the church angle?
    By Noble in forum Christian Outreach
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-12-2007, 11:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •