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Thread: Trump signs order diverting water to California farmers against state wishes

  1. #1

    Trump signs order diverting water to California farmers against state wishes

    Trump signs order diverting water to California farmers against state wishes

    President Trump on Wednesday signed an order in California to reengineer the state's water plans, completing a campaign promise to funnel water from the north to a thirsty ag industry and growing population further south.

    The ceremonial order comes after the Department of Interior late last year reversed its opinion on scientific findings that for a decade extended endangered species protections to various types of fish - a review that had been spurred by the order from Trump.

    Trump said the changes to the "outdated scientific research and biological opinions" would now help direct "as much water as possible, which will be a magnificent amount, a massive amount of water for the use of California farmers and ranchers."

    "It would be different if you had a drought," Trump added of restrictions. "You don't have a drought. You have tremendous amounts of water.”
    ...
    More: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/tr...es/ar-BB10aQvX
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  3. #2
    "It would be different if you had a drought," Trump added of restrictions. "You don't have a drought. You have tremendous amounts of water.”
    Hate to break it to Trump, but California is having a drought again.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul
    They are what they hate.” - B4L


    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  4. #3
    President Trump on Wednesday signed an order in California to reengineer the state's water plans, completing a campaign promise to funnel water from the north to a thirsty ag industry and growing population further south.
    Water for agriculture is good. Water diverted to a wasteful, decrepit, over-populated city like Los Angeles is a travesty.

    So the delta smelt is the usual excuse for not diverting water. But the bigger problem is that during a drought year like we have now, if too much water is diverted south, salinity backs up into the delta, which then effects many things, including local agriculture and water. Regular drinking water plants upstream in the usually fresh water are not desalinization plants, and they will start to fail when ocean water backs up and turns it brackish.

    Even worse, how much will go to the water resellers? Wonder if Feinstein was advising Trump on this move?

    In the 1990s the Resnicks gained control of what was originally meant to be a state-owned water storage bank; it now sells water back to the state at a premium. Since 1993, they’ve donated nearly $5 million to state and federal campaigns and candidates—typically to whomever is in power. They threw a party at their Beverly Hills mansion for Feinstein and entertained her at their second home in Aspen, Colorado. In 2009, Feinstein sent a letter two Obama cabinet secretaries on the Resnicks’ behalf that helped convince the feds to delay a plan to curtail delta water diversions for the sake of endangered fish. Feinstein’s new Senate water bill would allow delta water to reach California’s Kern County, where it would be available to the Resnicks’ water bank.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul
    They are what they hate.” - B4L


    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian4Liberty View Post
    Water for agriculture is good. Water diverted to a wasteful, decrepit, over-populated city like Los Angeles is a travesty.

    So the delta smelt is the usual excuse for not diverting water. But the bigger problem is that during a drought year like we have now, if too much water is diverted south, salinity backs up into the delta, which then effects many things, including local agriculture and water. Regular drinking water plants upstream in the usually fresh water are not desalinization plants, and they will start to fail when ocean water backs up and turns it brackish.

    Even worse, how much will go to the water resellers? Wonder if Feinstein was advising Trump on this move?
    And in the meantime, because water was diverted from agriculture all the farmers are drilling wells. Now the whole Central Valley is is dropping in elevation because of all the wells pulling so much water. There has to be a compromise or they are all done for...

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by ATruepatriot View Post
    And in the meantime, because water was diverted from agriculture all the farmers are drilling wells. Now the whole Central Valley is is dropping in elevation because of all the wells pulling so much water. There has to be a compromise or they are all done for...
    Yeah, some of that is for farming. Additionally, there are claims that Resnick is pumping up well water, putting it into his water bank, and then selling it to L.A. at a premium.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul
    They are what they hate.” - B4L


    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  7. #6

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian4Liberty View Post
    Yeah, some of that is for farming. Additionally, there are claims that Resnick is pumping up well water, putting it into his water bank, and then selling it to L.A. at a premium.
    The LA situation has always disgusted me. They steal water from everywhere destroying the sources. Ever got on Google earth and looked at how many backyard swimming pools and golf courses there really are? The important priorities in life. And still they have not made any serious efforts to build desalination plants like they should have 50 years ago.

    They don't have much room to work with in the central valley, they continue as they are and they are going to turn it into a new inland Sea. They should know better, they already went through this years ago when they were pumping oil out down around the Santa Monica area. It started sinking so fast they had to pump sea water back down to replace the oil they took out.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ATruepatriot View Post
    The LA situation has always disgusted me. They steal water from everywhere destroying the sources. Ever got on Google earth and looked at how many backyard swimming pools and golf courses there really are? The important priorities in life. And still they have not made any serious efforts to build desalination plants like they should have 50 years ago.

    They don't have much room to work with in the central valley, they continue as they are and they are going to turn it into a new inland Sea. They should know better, they already went through this years ago when they were pumping oil out down around the Santa Monica area. It started sinking so fast they had to pump sea water back down to replace the oil they took out.
    Yeah, for some reason, they don’t care about how they get the water in L.A. They waste it like it’s unlimited. Meanwhile the places they take the water from let their landscaping die, don’t flush the toilet, and there are constant proposals for rationing.

    The Central Valley will be an inland sea at some point. The property damage will be the worse ever seen. They have built housing and strip malls on what used to be flood plains. Places that used to be shallow lakes during wet winters now are fully developed. All it will take is the right amount of rain. Modern drainage and levees can only handle so much, especially with an aged, earthen levee system.

    Like this:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862

    And the ignorant, brainwashed, cult of climate change will blame it on CO2. It’s happened before, it will happen again.

    Native Americans knew that the Sacramento Valley could become an inland sea when the rains came. Their storytellers described water filling the valley from the Coast Range to the Sierra.[13]
    ...
    The entire Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys were inundated. An area about 300 miles (480 km) long, averaging 20 miles (32 km) in width,[18] and covering 5,000 to 6,000 square miles (13,000 to 16,000 km2) was under water.[12] The water flooding the Central Valley reached depths up to 30 feet
    Last edited by Brian4Liberty; 02-22-2020 at 01:14 PM.
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Corporate-Internet-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul
    They are what they hate.” - B4L


    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.



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  11. #9
    The issue of State's Rights aside, cities only use about ten percent of the state's water.



    Agricultural water use is falling, while the economic value of farm production is growing.

    More than nine million acres of farmland in California are irrigated, representing roughly 80% of all water used for businesses and homes. Higher-revenue perennial crops—nuts, grapes, and other fruit—have increased as a share of irrigated acreage (from 16% in 1980 to 33% in 2015 statewide, and from 21% to 45% in the southern Central Valley). This shift, plus rising crop yields, has increased the economic return on water used for agriculture. Farm production generated 38% more gross state product in 2015 than in 1980, even though farm water use was about 14% lower. But even as the agricultural economy is growing, the rest of the economy is growing faster. Today, farm production and food processing generate about 2% of California’s gross state product, down from about 5% in the early 1960s.

    Despite population growth, total urban water use has also fallen.

    The San Francisco Bay and South Coast regions account for most urban water use in California. Both rely heavily on water imported from other parts of the state. Total urban water use has been falling even as the population grows. Even before the latest drought, per capita water use had declined significantly—from 231 gallons per day in 1990 to 180 gallons per day in 2010—reflecting substantial efforts to reduce water use through pricing incentives and mandatory installation of water-saving technologies like low-flow toilets and shower heads. In 2015, per capita use fell to 146 gallons per day in response to drought-related conservation requirements. Much of the recent savings came from reducing landscape watering, which makes up roughly half of all urban water use. Per capita use has since rebounded slightly, but a new state law will require further long-term reductions.
    https://www.ppic.org/publication/wat...in-california/

  12. #10
    https://www.motherjones.com/environm...ifornia-water/

    POM Pistachios. POM Pomegranate juice. Almonds. Halos mandarin oranges. Fiji water.

    Meet the California Couple Who Uses More Water Than Every Home in Los Angeles Combined

    Rafaela Tijerina first met la señora at a school in the town of Lost Hills, deep in the farm country of California’s Central Valley. They were both there for a school board meeting, and the superintendent had failed to show up. Tijerina, a 74-year-old former cotton picker and veteran school board member, apologized for the superintendent—he must have had another important meeting—and for the fact that her own voice was faint; she had cancer. “Oh no, you talk great,” the woman replied with a warm smile, before she began handing out copies of her book, Rubies in the Orchard: How to Uncover the Hidden Gems in Your Business. “To my friend with the sweet voice,” she wrote inside Tijerina’s copy.

    It was only later that Tijerina realized the woman owned the almond groves where Tijerina’s husband worked as a pruner. Lynda Resnick and her husband, Stewart, also own a few other things: Teleflora, the nation’s largest flower delivery service; Fiji Water, the best-selling brand of premium bottled water; Pom Wonderful, the iconic pomegranate juice brand; Halos, the insanely popular brand of mandarin oranges formerly known as Cuties; and Wonderful Pistachios, with its “Get Crackin'” ad campaign. The Resnicks are the world’s biggest producers of pistachios and almonds, and they also hold vast groves of lemons, grapefruit, and navel oranges. All told, they claim to own America’s second-largest produce company, worth an estimated $4.2 billion.

    The Resnicks have amassed this empire by following a simple agricultural precept: Crops need water. Having shrewdly maneuvered the backroom politics of California’s byzantine water rules, they are now thought to consume more of the state’s water than any other family, farm, or company. They control more of it in some years than what’s used by the residents of Los Angeles and the entire San Francisco Bay Area combined.

    Such an incredible stockpiling of the state’s most precious natural resource might have attracted more criticism were it not for the Resnicks’ progressive bona fides. Last year, the couple’s political and charitable donations topped $48 million. They’ve spent $15 million on the 2,500 residents of Lost Hills—roughly 600 of whom work for the couple—funding everything from sidewalks, parks, and playing fields to affordable housing, a preschool, and a health clinic.

    Last year, the Resnicks rebranded all their holdings as the Wonderful Company to highlight their focus on healthy products and philanthropy. “Our company has always believed that success means doing well by doing good,” Stewart Resnick said in a press release announcing the name change. “That is why we place such importance on our extensive community outreach programs, education and health initiatives and sustainability efforts. We are deeply committed to doing our part to build a better world and inspiring others to do the same.”

    But skeptics note that the Resnicks’ donations to Lost Hills began a few months after Earth Island Journal documented the yawning wealth gap between the couple and their company town, a dusty assemblage of trailer homes, dirt roads, and crumbling infrastructure. They claim the Resnicks’ influence among politicians and liberal celebrities is quietly warping California’s water policies away from the interests of the state’s residents, wildlife, and even most farmers. “I think the Wonderful Company and the Resnicks are truly the top 1 percent wrapped in a green veneer, in a veneer of social justice,” says Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla of Restore the Delta, an advocacy group that represents farmers, fishermen, and environmentalists in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, east of San Francisco. “If they truly cared about a sustainable California and farmworkers within their own community, then how things are structured and how they are done by the Wonderful Company would be much different.”

    The Resnicks expanded into agriculture in 1978, mostly as a hedge against inflation. They purchased 2,500 acres of orange trees in California’s Kern County citrus belt. Ten years later, during the state’s last great drought, they snatched up tens of thousands of acres of almond, pistachio, and citrus groves for bargain prices. By 1996, their agricultural company, Paramount Farms, had become the world’s largest producer and packager of pistachios and almonds, with sales of about $1.5 billion; it now owns 130,000 acres of farmland and grosses $4.8 billion.

    Along the way, Paramount acquired 100 acres of pomegranate orchards. After the Resnicks’ family physician mentioned the fruit’s key role in Mediterranean folk medicine, Lynda commissioned scientific studies and found that pomegranate juice had more antioxidant properties than red wine. By 2001 she had created Pom and soon was selling juice in little hourglass bottles under the label P♥M, a hint at its supposed cardiac benefits. Less subtle was the national marketing campaign, which showed a Pom bottle with a broken noose around its neck, under the slogan “Cheat death.”

    Pom was an overnight sensation, doing millions of dollars in sales by the end of the following year—and cementing Resnick’s status as a marketing genius. “Lynda Resnick is to branding what Warren Buffett is to investing,” Gloria Steinem wrote in 2009, in one of dozens of celebrity blurbs for Rubies in the Orchard.

    Sometimes, though, Resnick’s Pom claims went too far. Last year, an appeals judge sided with a Federal Trade Commission ruling saying the company’s ads had overhyped Pom’s ability to prevent heart disease, prostate cancer, and erectile dysfunction. “I think it was unfair,” Resnick told me. “And I think it’s a tragedy if the fresh fruits and vegetables that are really the medicine chest of the 21st century have to adhere to the same rules as a drug that could possibly harm you.”

    It wasn’t the first time Resnick had pitched her products as health panaceas. As previously reported in Mother Jones, she marketed Fiji’s “living water” as a healthier alternative to tap water, which the company claimed could contain “4,000 contaminants.” She has pushed the cardiovascular benefits of almonds, touted mandarin oranges as a healthy snack option for kids, and called nutrient-dense pistachios “the skinny nut.” Her $15 million “Get Crackin'” campaign, the largest media buy in the history of snack nuts, included a Super Bowl ad starring Stephen Colbert. Pistachio sales more than doubled in just three months and steadily increased over the following year to reach $114 million—proving that, sometimes, money really does grow on trees.


    Long article at link.
    Last edited by Zippyjuan; 02-22-2020 at 01:59 PM.

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    https://www.motherjones.com/environm...ifornia-water/

    POM Pistachios. POM Pomegranate juice. Almonds. Halos mandarin oranges. Fiji water.





    Long article at link.
    People in cities don't eat crops?

  14. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ATruepatriot View Post
    The LA situation has always disgusted me. They steal water from everywhere destroying the sources. Ever got on Google earth and looked at how many backyard swimming pools and golf courses there really are? The important priorities in life. And still they have not made any serious efforts to build desalination plants like they should have 50 years ago.

    They don't have much room to work with in the central valley, they continue as they are and they are going to turn it into a new inland Sea. They should know better, they already went through this years ago when they were pumping oil out down around the Santa Monica area. It started sinking so fast they had to pump sea water back down to replace the oil they took out.
    Water from Colorado is even allocated for California.
    When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? - Miguel de Cervantes, (Don Quixote)

    Quote Originally Posted by Voluntarist View Post
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the Federal Reserve Notes of patriotic central banks

  15. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls' Revere View Post
    Water from Colorado is even allocated for California.
    The Colorado River water is shared by all of the states it passes through. It does not belong to just one state and does not always make it all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

  16. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    The Colorado River water is shared by all of the states it passes through. It does not belong to just one state and does not always make it all the way to the Pacific Ocean.
    Yes, is shared according to the pact they signed. California gets a majority of it. Btw, minute 19 I think is being renegotiated.

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/n...ute-319-water/

    Here is when it was reunited with the Sea of Cortez.

    https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/...ns-to-the-sea/
    Last edited by Pauls' Revere; 02-23-2020 at 01:17 PM.
    When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? - Miguel de Cervantes, (Don Quixote)

    Quote Originally Posted by Voluntarist View Post
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the Federal Reserve Notes of patriotic central banks

  17. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls' Revere View Post
    Yes, is shared according to the pact they signed. California gets a majority of it. Btw, minute 19 I think is being renegotiated.

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/n...ute-319-water/
    The other problem with the agreement is that it was made in a time of more rainfall than we see in the area today.

  18. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    The other problem with the agreement is that it was made in a time of more rainfall than we see in the area today.
    True, and I think minute 319 is an updated version? Anyway flow and allocation is proportional to rainfall and snowpack etc...
    When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? - Miguel de Cervantes, (Don Quixote)

    Quote Originally Posted by Voluntarist View Post
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the Federal Reserve Notes of patriotic central banks



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  20. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian4Liberty View Post
    Yeah, for some reason, they don’t care about how they get the water in L.A. They waste it like it’s unlimited. Meanwhile the places they take the water from let their landscaping die, don’t flush the toilet, and there are constant proposals for rationing.

    The Central Valley will be an inland sea at some point. The property damage will be the worse ever seen. They have built housing and strip malls on what used to be flood plains. Places that used to be shallow lakes during wet winters now are fully developed. All it will take is the right amount of rain. Modern drainage and levees can only handle so much, especially with an aged, earthen levee system.

    Like this:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862

    And the ignorant, brainwashed, cult of climate change will blame it on CO2. It’s happened before, it will happen again.
    Yep...

  21. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls' Revere View Post
    Water from Colorado is even allocated for California.
    Seven states in that Charter and LA is getting it all. It's bull$#@!.

  22. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by ATruepatriot View Post
    Seven states in that Charter and LA is getting it all. It's bull$#@!.
    Cities use about ten percent of the water. LA does not get "all of it". Agriculture uses a huge chunk of it.

  23. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Cities use about ten percent of the water. LA does not get "all of it". Agriculture uses a huge chunk of it.
    You and have been through this before Zippy... Absolute Bull$#@!... Go get on Google earth, can't hide it. All those backyard swimming pools and Golf Courses are killers. Those are not showers, washers, and dishwashers you are looking at. Not to mention those $#@!s need to wash their cars three times a week or more because the ignorant priority is aesthetics and not practical survival. They are insane period.

    Whoever is putting out those stats are absolute liars just based on the sheer amount of true evaporation area alone... Nope, Absolute Bull$#@! period. They have swimming pools and only live one block from the beach... Dumb as hell considering the situation the really truly happen to be in.

    A picture is worth a thousand words. Go look...

  24. #21
    Colorado River Aquaduct CRA.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_River_Aqueduct

    The Colorado River Aqueduct begins near Parker Dam on the Colorado River. There, the water is pumped up the Whipple Mountains where the water emerges and begins flowing through 60 mi (97 km) of siphons and open canals on the southern Mojave Desert. At Iron Mountain, the water is again lifted, 144 ft (44 m). The aqueduct then turns southwest towards the Eagle Mountains. There the water is lifted two more times, first by 438 ft (134 m) to an elevation of more than 1,400 ft (430 m), then by 441 ft (134 m) to an elevation of 1,800 ft (550 m) above sea level. The CRA then runs through the deserts of the Coachella Valley and through the San Gorgonio Pass. Near Cabazon, the aqueduct begins to run underground until it enters the San Jacinto Tunnel at the base of the San Jacinto Mountains. On the other side of the mountains the aqueduct continues to run underground until it reaches the terminus at Lake Mathews. From there, 156 mi (251 km) of distribution lines, along with eight more tunnels, delivers water to member cities. Some of the water is siphoned off in San Jacinto via the San Diego canal, part of the San Diego Aqueduct that delivers water to San Diego County.[3]
    When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? - Miguel de Cervantes, (Don Quixote)

    Quote Originally Posted by Voluntarist View Post
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the Federal Reserve Notes of patriotic central banks

  25. #22
    Seems like with any industry you have to keep changing to survive.. perhaps the ag industry in CA's central valley needs to focus on lower water usage crops. A recent Mike Rowe episode talked about agriculture in Phoenix Arizona using shipping containers, can grow an acre of greens on 5 gallons of water a week.

    Trump has been heavy into Big Ag bailouts so nothing new here.
    “…let us teach them that all who draw breath are of equal worth, and that those who seek to press heel upon the throat of liberty, will fall to the cry of FREEDOM!!!” – Spartacus, War of the Damned

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