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Thread: 'Normal' Human Body Temperature Has Changed in the Last Century

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    'Normal' Human Body Temperature Has Changed in the Last Century

    Whether you have a stomachache, a wrist sprain or a chronic disease, one of the first things doctors and nurses will do at an appointment is take your temperature. A normal temperature means your body is humming along the way it should. A higher temperature means you have a fever, and shows your body could be fighting an infection.
    And since 1871, normal has meant 98.6F (37C). That number was determined by a German physician, based on millions of readings from 25,000 German patients, taken by sticking thermometers under their arms. When doctors in the U.S. and Europe repeated the experiment in local populations, they came up with the same number, so it stuck.
    But in a paper published last week in eLife, researchers at Stanford University reported that the normal human body temperature has dropped since that time. And that means the standards that doctors have been using to define normal temperature and fever might need to be reworked.
    Julie Parsonnet, a professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, and her team analyzed data from three large databases involving more than 677,000 temperature readings from nearly 190,000 people, collected between 1862 and 2017. The first dataset is drawn from health information collected on Union Army soldiers from 1862 to 1930. The second, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, comes from U.S. population-wide data from 1971 to 1975. The third is the most recent, and includes measurements taken by the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment study from 2007 to 2017.
    The team found that average body temperatures in the earliest database, from the Union Army veterans, were higher than the temperatures recorded in each of the latter two periods. On average, the temperatures dropped by 0.03C and 0.29C per decade for men and women, respectively, over the 150-year span. To address the issue of whether thermometers were less accurate in earlier times, or whether previous generations of doctors measured temperature differently, the scientists also compared body temperatures within a single population, to minimize any potential measurement bias. Within the Union Army population, for example, the trend remained strong; temperatures were higher among those born earlier than among those born later, by about 0.02C per decade.
    In previous studies people who found lower temperatures [in more recent times] thought the temperatures taken in the 19th century were just wrong, Parsonnet says. I dont think they were wrong; I think the temperature has gone down.
    It makes sense that body temperatures would change over time, says Parsonnet. We have grown in height on average, which changes our temperature, and we have gotten heavier, which also changes our body temperature, she says. [Today,] we have better nutrition, better medical care, and better public health. We have air conditioning and heating, so we live more comfortable lives at a consistent 68F to 72F in our homes, so its not a struggle to keep the body warm. Its not beyond the imagination that our body temperatures would change as a result.

    More at: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/norm...162917118.html
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    So instead of being 98.6 it is now 98.3? Should we start worrying?

    by about 0.02C per decade
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    The quality seems to have dropped significantly since I came here, I guess you get what you pay for.
    I am Zippy and I approve of this post. But you don't have to.

  5. #4
    I went to play poker a few weeks ago at MGM Springfield. When I got there I was cold. After a few hours I was not. What changed? When I arrived only 3 active tables. Later there were probably 20 active tables. All those people were radiating their body heat and heating the room. Maybe that is what is happening to our planet.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Schifference View Post
    I went to play poker a few weeks ago at MGM Springfield. When I got there I was cold. After a few hours I was not. What changed? When I arrived only 3 active tables. Later there were probably 20 active tables. All those people were radiating their body heat and heating the room. Maybe that is what is happening to our planet.
    Did anybody fart?

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by timosman View Post
    Did anybody fart?
    Not allowed.



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