Results 1 to 30 of 30

Thread: Barr speaks at the Federalist Society's National Lawyers Convention

  1. #1

    Barr speaks at the Federalist Society's National Lawyers Convention

    Openly Straight Man, Danke, Awarded Top Rated Influencer

    Ⅎ˥ƎSWIH ˥˥I⋊ ⊥,NᗡIᗡ NƎI⊥SԀƎ

    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!


    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.



  2. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  3. #2
    Attorney General William P. Barr Delivers the 19th Annual Barbara K. Olson Memorial Lecture at the Federalist Society's 2019 National Lawyers Convention

    text:
    https://www.justice.gov/opa/speech/a...morial-lecture
    Openly Straight Man, Danke, Awarded Top Rated Influencer

    Ⅎ˥ƎSWIH ˥˥I⋊ ⊥,NᗡIᗡ NƎI⊥SԀƎ

    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!


    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  4. #3
    This was a fantastic lecture. And the tyrant left is already calling for his impeachment for it.

  5. #4
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  6. #5
    Whose dumb idea was this?They should have run his statist ass out of there on a rail
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    "A politician will do almost anything to keep their job, even become a patriot" - Hearst

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by fcreature View Post
    This was a fantastic lecture. And the tyrant left is already calling for his impeachment for it.
    The left will call for impeachment on just about anything.
    "Perhaps one of the most important accomplishments of my administration is minding my own business."

    Calvin Coolidge

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Collins View Post
    Whose dumb idea was this?They should have run his statist ass out of there on a rail
    Perhaps you can explain what he said that you object to?
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Collins View Post
    Whose dumb idea was this?They should have run his statist ass out of there on a rail
    You expect a statist ass to be run out of the Federalist Society?
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I don't really care if I happen to be wrong about your positions, you are wrong about mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I didn't vote for Trump.
    A POX ON BOTH YOUR PARTIES



  10. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Perhaps you can explain what he said that you object to?
    His support for Ruby Ridge incident, his anti-gun stance, etc.
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    "A politician will do almost anything to keep their job, even become a patriot" - Hearst

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Perhaps you can explain what he said that you object to?
    Actions speak louder than words. He's already shown his pre-crime authoritarian colors. Go ahead, call me a leftist.
    "The Patriarch"

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Perhaps you can explain what he said that you object to?
    I reject his whole premise. The Executive Branch hasn't been "ground down" since the 1960s. It has created bureaus, imposed regulations, issued executive orders, and prosecuted an endless succession of non-war wars which have been used as an excuse to declare an equally endless succession of "emergencies".

    The one really good thing about the Constitution was it made it hard to do things. Now the executive regulates, prosecutes, bypasses, declares, bureaucratizes and tyrannizes with the greatest of ease.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I don't really care if I happen to be wrong about your positions, you are wrong about mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I didn't vote for Trump.
    A POX ON BOTH YOUR PARTIES

  14. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    I reject his whole premise. The Executive Branch hasn't been "ground down" since the 1960s. It has created bureaus, imposed regulations, issued executive orders, and prosecuted an endless succession of non-war wars which have been used as an excuse to declare an equally endless succession of "emergencies".

    The one really good thing about the Constitution was it made it hard to do things. Now the executive regulates, prosecutes, bypasses, declares, bureaucratizes and tyrannizes with the greatest of ease.
    Other than the war power and emergency power delegation you are completely wrong.

    Congress has unconstitutionally imposed controls on the executive and transferred power from the President to the bureaucracy and the courts.
    It all started with the institution of the civil service system that prevented the President from firing bureaucrats at will and instituted the deepstate.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  15. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Other than the war power and emergency power delegation you are completely wrong.

    Congress has unconstitutionally imposed controls on the executive and transferred power from the President to the bureaucracy and the courts.
    It all started with the institution of the civil service system that prevented the President from firing bureaucrats at will and instituted the deepstate.
    The war powers and emergency declarations have by themselves done as much or more as as anything and maybe everything else. That said, how does expanding the Executive Branch and giving the Executive Branch the ability to enact regulations with the rule of law behind them that Congress had nothing to do with empower Congress at the expense of Executive power?
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I don't really care if I happen to be wrong about your positions, you are wrong about mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I didn't vote for Trump.
    A POX ON BOTH YOUR PARTIES

  16. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    That said, how does expanding the Executive Branch and giving the Executive Branch the ability to enact regulations with the rule of law behind them that Congress had nothing to do with empower Congress at the expense of Executive power?
    They have taken all power over the bureaucracy to themselves.
    The President is prevented from doing anything to the bureaucracy without the consent of Congress.
    If you want to get technical they have invented a new branch of government and transferred power from the executive branch to it and making it accountable to them more than to the President.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  17. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    They have taken all power over the bureaucracy to themselves.
    The President is prevented from doing anything to the bureaucracy without the consent of Congress.
    If you want to get technical they have invented a new branch of government and transferred power from the executive branch to it and making it accountable to them more than to the President.
    We are talking about the same people Congress can't get testimony out of because Executive Privilege, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I don't really care if I happen to be wrong about your positions, you are wrong about mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I didn't vote for Trump.
    A POX ON BOTH YOUR PARTIES

  18. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    We are talking about the same people Congress can't get testimony out of because Executive Privilege, right?
    Yes, the goal is to elevate the bureaucracy above all elected officials and subordinate only to the lifetime appointed judiciary.

    The degradation of Presidential authority over the executive branch is just as bad or worse than the delegation of Congressional authority to the President and/or the bureaucracy but you don't hear anyone mention very often.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment



  19. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  20. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Yes, the goal is to elevate the bureaucracy above all elected officials and subordinate only to the lifetime appointed judiciary.

    The degradation of Presidential authority over the executive branch is just as bad or worse than the delegation of Congressional authority to the President and/or the bureaucracy but you don't hear anyone mention very often.
    Let me see if I'm keeping this tale straight.

    The bureaucracy is the Deep State. Not the bankers. Not the arms manufacturers. Not the people reaping the serious money. The bureaucracy. And it wants Trump out, probably because Trump keeps firing them.

    It has more power than Congress, and Congress has more power than Trump. But the Deep Bureaucracy needs Congress to get rid of Trump. Yet it won't testify before Congress to help them get rid of Trump.

    That's your story? You sticking to it?
    Last edited by acptulsa; 11-18-2019 at 09:04 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I don't really care if I happen to be wrong about your positions, you are wrong about mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    I didn't vote for Trump.
    A POX ON BOTH YOUR PARTIES

  21. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    if we don't count the 14,000 he sent instead of declaring war on Iran he had reduced the deployed troops by about 7,555.
    "The one permanent emotion of the inferior man is fear - fear of the unknown, the complex, the inexplicable. What he wants above everything else is safety."
    H. L. Mencken

  22. #19
    I'm no fan of Bill Barr for sure, but then outside of immigration I wasn't a fan of Sessions either. At least Barr is more willing to attack leftists, and hopefully prosecute them. That's the one silver lining.

  23. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    Let me see if I'm keeping this tale straight.

    The bureaucracy is the Deep State. Not the bankers. Not the arms manufacturers. Not the people reaping the serious money. The bureaucracy. And it wants Trump out, probably because Trump keeps firing them.

    It has more power than Congress, and Congress has more power than Trump. But the Deep Bureaucracy needs Congress to get rid of Trump. Yet it won't testify before Congress to help them get rid of Trump.

    That's your story? You sticking to it?
    You need to read what I said and stop imagining I said thing I didn't say.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  24. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Collins View Post
    His support for Ruby Ridge incident, his anti-gun stance, etc.
    Weird. I didn't hear anything about those topics in the lecture.

  25. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Leftist headline:
    Was it you suggesting Barr was Deep State recently ( around the time news of Deputy AJ Ronsenstein comparing recent shootings to "white terrorism") ?



    Related

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/02/07/justice-department-online-gambling-gop-donor-sheldon-adelson-trump-column/2787194002/

    Sheldon Adelson Got a Surprise Gift in the Middle of the Government Shutdown

    February 8 2019
    Department of Justice shouldn't end online gambling to appease Trump donor Sheldon Adelson

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by fcreature View Post
    Weird. I didn't hear anything about those topics in the lecture.
    Of course not. He plays to the crowd. He isn't an idiot.
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    "A politician will do almost anything to keep their job, even become a patriot" - Hearst

  27. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Collins View Post
    Of course not. He plays to the crowd. He isn't an idiot.
    Oh, okay. I guess I'm confused about the relevance of your statement then...?

    Any-who, it was a very good lecture with a very sound constitutional basis.



  28. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  29. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by fcreature View Post

    Any-who, it was a very good lecture with a very sound constitutional basis.
    In which case he is a hypocrite because he doesn't give a damn about the Constitution.
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    "A politician will do almost anything to keep their job, even become a patriot" - Hearst

  30. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by fcreature View Post
    Weird. I didn't hear anything about those topics in the lecture.
    https://www.theamericanconservative....g-fbi-snipers/
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    "A politician will do almost anything to keep their job, even become a patriot" - Hearst

  31. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Collins View Post
    ... huh??? Even less relevant to the topic at hand.

    Maybe you can listen to the lecture and we can discuss the points made within?

  32. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by fcreature View Post
    ... huh??? Even less relevant to the topic at hand.

    Maybe you can listen to the lecture and we can discuss the points made within?
    Doesn't matter. Anything that comes out of his mouth is crap.
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    "A politician will do almost anything to keep their job, even become a patriot" - Hearst

  33. #29
    School children learn that there are three branches of government: the legislative, executive, and judicial. In actual practice, however, there are four branches of government.
    The fourth is what for decades now has been called a "headless fourth branch of government," the administrative state.
    As early as 1937, in a "Report of the President's Committee on Administrative Management," the authors write:

    Without plan or intent, there has grown up a headless "fourth branch" of the Government, responsible to no one, and impossible of coordination with the general policies and work of the Government as determined by the people through their duly elected representatives.
    The problem of waste and lack of accountability in this fourth branch, the report notes, has "been clearly recognized for a generations and ha[s] been growing steadily worse decade by decade."
    The Spoils System and the Permanent Bureaucracy

    The report isn't wrong. By the late nineteenth century, "civil service reform" had ended the old system "spoils system" and the advent of lifelong "professional" civil servants, brought the establishment of a bureaucratic class which saw its interests and loyalties as separate from the elected civilian government. This detachment from elected policymakers meant the administrative state was not terribly concerned with either efficiency of responsiveness to the public. It became an interest group all its own, but with far more power than any ordinary interest group.
    The creation of the professional civil service had been a victory over the legacy of the populist Andrew Jackson who had demanded a move away from the old "professional" bureaucracy established by the Federalists. Jackson denounced the professional bureaucrats, concluding such persons "acquire a habit of looking with indifference upon the public interests and of tolerating conduct from which an unpracticed man would revolt." Instead, the Jacksonians insisted "rotation" in government offices "constitutes a leading principle in the republican creed."
    In practice, of course, this new non-political bureaucracy was anything but unbiased. Over time, the bureaucracy became self-consciously devoted to the "merit" system under which the bureaucrats imagined they gained and retained their offices by virtue of their own excellence.
    Nonetheless, this problem of the bureaucracy as self-interested class would have remained quite limited were the powers of the bureaucracy more limited. Yet with the advent of the New Deal under Franklin Roosevelt, the size, scope, and power of the administrative state multiplied.
    The Bureaucracy Takes Over the Functions of the Other Branches of Government

    Moreover, as the New Deal progressed, the regulatory agencies came to assume all the powers that were supposed to be reserved to the branches of government that were given specific powers in the federal constitution. In his book Ex America (aka The People's Pottage) Garet Garrett described this transformation:
    These agencies have built up a large body of administrative law which the people are obliged to obey. And not only to they make their own laws; they enforce their own laws, acting as prosecutor, jury and judge; and appeal form their decisions to the regular courts is difficult. … Thus the Constitutional separation of the three governmental powers, namely, the legislative, the executive and the judicial is entirely lost."
    Thus, thanks to the rise of this fourth branch of government, an American is subject to laws not passed by any Congress, and subject to judicial punishments not commanded by any court of law. It's all done "administratively" but nonetheless allows the agencies to "make and execute their own laws."
    The Rise of the National Security Bureaucracy

    At the same time the regulatory administrative state was making so many gains, so was the federal government's domestic police force.
    First came the Justice Department's Bureau of Investigation — later the FBI — and its General Intelligence Division used to spy on Americans during the First World War. The Division's head Jay Edgar Hoover helped execute the "Palmer Raids" used to persecute Americans who were insufficiently worshipful of the Wilson administration's national security policies. Over time, Hoover would work tirelessly to turn the FBI into a law unto itself, using it to blackmail politicians, harass innocent Americans, and generally twist American law and the American political system to benefit Hoover, his cronies, and the FBI itself.
    Things became worse after the Second World War when Congress made permanent the intelligence agencies that had formed during the war to gather intelligence on the Axis.
    These organizations — most notably the Central Intelligence Agency — would come to function virtually without oversight, with most of their activities declared too secret to endure public scrutiny. Over time, these ostensibly civilian organizations would become increasingly intertwined with the growing "special operations" arms of the Department of Defense. By the early twenty-first century, the Pentagon would develop "its own clandestine intelligence" capabilities and take over many of the "covert paramilitary activities and unconventional warfare" operations once directed by the CIA. The line between the nation's intelligence agencies and the conventional military agencies became increasingly blurred.
    But these agencies always exercised far more power in the American political system than was indicated on paper. As J. Edgar Hoover knew all too well, intelligence agencies can use their powers to collect information on elected officials, and use that information to protect the intelligence agencies themselves. The strategic use of "leaks," reports, investigations, and criminal prosecutions through the Justice Department allow the intelligence organs of the United States to "nudge" policymakers in directions that service the preferred agenda of the security agencies themselves.
    Ordinary and obscure Americans, of course, are all the more at the mercy of organizations like the FBI. Few regular people possess the resources necessary to mount a defense against the Justice Department's gargantuan budgets and legions of attorneys that can be aimed at any American who becomes annoying to these federal law enforcement bureaucrats and their friends.

    More at: https://www.zerohedge.com/political/...nch-government
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  34. #30
    More unconstitutional power grabbing by Congress:




    Legislation to stop Donald Trump from withdrawing the US from Nato has been approved for a Senate vote, amid uncertainty over the president’s intentions towards the alliance.
    The Senate foreign relations committee on Wednesday voted unanimously for the bipartisan bill which will now await a slot to go to the Senate. Senator Tim Kaine, the draft legislation’s lead Democratic sponsor, said it was a response to fears that the Trump administration is actively considering withdrawal.
    “We’re aware that it has been seriously debated and seriously considered in the White House at the highest levels,” Kaine told the Guardian. Trump’s former national security adviser, John Bolton, reportedly warned last month that, if re-elected in 2020, Trump could go “full isolationist” and withdraw from the 70-year-old North Atlantic alliance.


    Kaine predicted his bill to block a Nato withdrawal would gain overwhelming support from the House of Representatives and win a veto-proof majority in the upper chamber of at least 67 votes.
    “I don’t think [Trump] would veto this bill if it came to his desk because of the signal that it would send would be such an unfortunate one,” Kaine told the Guardian. “It would be seen as so destabilizing by our allies that I don’t think he would do it. And furthermore, I don’t think the president would veto a bill if he thought he’s going to be overridden, and I think he would be overridden on this one.”
    The bill aims to close a loophole in the US constitution, which requires a two-thirds vote in the Senate to ratify a treaty, but is silent on what it takes to exit a treaty. Kaine’s bill requires the president to seek the advice and consent of the Senate to pull the US out of Nato. The president would have to notify Congress of any effort taken towards termination of US membership, and any no congressionally mandated funds could be spent on withdrawal. Congressional legal counsel would be authorized to challenge the White House in the courts over any presidential attempt to withdraw.


    “It specifies clearly, that the the law of the land will now be that a president cannot withdraw from Nato absent a congressional vote,” Kaine said. “So he could announce he was withdrawing, but that would be an illegal action, and we would feel completely confident that a court would uphold us.”
    Trump has raised doubt over whether he would order the US to fight if certain Nato allies were attacked, as required by article 5 of the alliance’s founding document. The president has suggested that collective defence should be made conditional on member states meeting the alliance goal of spending at least 2% of GDP on defence.
    At a leaders’ meeting to mark the 70th anniversary of Nato in the UK earlier this month, Trump defended Nato against criticism from the French president, Emmanuel Macron, but did little to allay fears that he did not fear bound by Nato’s collective defence obligations.
    “We may not change Donald Trump’s minds about these things. But I think what our allies are looking for is some assurance that the American public still finds value in the alliance,” Senator Kaine said. “And I think a bill like this, in addition to having some practical effect, would start to answer that question positively.”
    Constanze Stelzenmueller, the Kissinger chair on foreign policy and international relations at the Library of Congress, said the legislation, if passed, might go some way to steadying European nerves ahead of the 2020 US elections.

    More at: https://www.yahoo.com/news/senate-co...230358166.html
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-08-2015, 12:32 PM
  2. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 07-23-2013, 12:48 PM
  3. Bob Barr's speech to the Libertarian Party National Convention
    By Shotdown1027 in forum U.S. Political News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-29-2010, 03:14 PM
  4. What is the alternative to the Federalist Society?
    By Agorism in forum U.S. Political News
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-21-2010, 08:08 PM
  5. What can you tell me about the Federalist Society?
    By Matt Collins in forum Grassroots Central
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-05-2009, 08:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •