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Thread: MPs Have Voted To Make It Harder For Boris Johnson To Secure A No-Deal Brexit

  1. #1

    MPs Have Voted To Make It Harder For Boris Johnson To Secure A No-Deal Brexit

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/alexwickham...no-deal-brexit

    Boris Johnson has been sent a stark warning about the scale of opposition to a no-deal Brexit, as MPs voted by a significant majority to make it harder for him to suspend Parliament if he becomes prime minister next week.

    In a wider margin of victory for anti-no deal MPs than expected, an amendment aimed at preventing Parliament from being prorogued passed by 315 to 274 — a majority of 41.

    Prorogation is a potential route for a Johnson government to leave the EU without a deal – it would mean suspending Commons sittings in order to stop MPs from blocking no-deal. During his leadership campaign Johnson has repeatedly kept this option on the table.

    Seventeen Tory MPs voted to make such a move more difficult on Thursday, in a sign of the future rebellion the next prime minister will face if he attempts to leave the EU without a deal.

    The rebels included minister Margot James, who quit her post in order to break the whip.

    Thirty further Tories abstained, including the chancellor Philip Hammond – who is expected to resign from the government next week before the Tory leadership result is announced – as did cabinet ministers David Gauke, Greg Clark, and Rory Stewart.

    With just days left in Downing Street, outgoing prime minister Theresa May was not expected to sack any of her senior ministers who broke the Tory whip by abstaining.

    “The Prime Minister is obviously disappointed that a number of Ministers failed to vote in this afternoon’s division. No doubt her successor will take this into account when forming their government.”

    Thursday’s vote will be seen as a clear indicator of the rebel alliance in Parliament that is seeking to block a no-deal Brexit.

    If Johnson enters Number 10 next week, he has said he will attempt to renegotiate a Brexit deal with the European Union, and if that fails then pursue leaving without a deal on October 31, “do or die”.

    The amendment passed today means that if Johnson does suspend Parliament in an attempt to force through a no-deal Brexit, he would be required to recall the Commons for five days in the weeks running up to the deadline.

    MPs could theoretically then attempt to prevent no-deal.

    Other options available to the anti no-deal MPs include bringing down a Johnson government in a confidence vote.
    The EU has said they are done trying to negotiate a new BREXIT deal so it seems to be either the existing offer or no deal.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    The quality seems to have dropped significantly since I came here, I guess you get what you pay for.
    "There is always a tweet. That has become accepted fact in the Trump presidency: For every pronouncement the President makes, there is at least one tweet from his past that directly contradicts his current view." -CNN

    I am Zippy and I approve of this post. But you don't have to.



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  3. #2
    https://eu-rope.ideasoneurope.eu/201...-what-he-said/



    Does Boris Johnson remember what he said?


    Who knows what Boris Johnson really believes, least of all him?
    He previously said “what most people in this country want is the single market”, and he would personally vote to remain a member of it.

    He told the BBC Andrew Marr Show in 2012: ″We would like a new relationship. And it’s very simple – what most people in this country want is the Single Market, the Common Market.”

    In the same year, he told BBC Radio Five Live, “Whether you have an in/out referendum now, I can’t quite see why it would be necessary.”

    He added that the prospect of Britain’s withdrawal from the EU would not “appeal”.

    Mr Johnson asked, “Suppose Britain voted tomorrow to come out: what would actually happen?”

    He continued:

    “We’d still have huge numbers of staff trying to monitor what was going on in the community, only we wouldn’t be able to sit in the council of ministers, we wouldn’t have any vote at all. Now I don’t think that’s a prospect that’s likely to appeal.”

    In The Telegraph in May 2013, Boris Johnson wrote that if Britain left the EU, “we would have to recognise that most of our problems are not caused by Bwussels” [sic].

    In his article, titled ‘Quitting the EU won’t solve our problems, says Boris Johnson,’ he responded that, “the question of EU membership is no longer of key importance to the destiny of this country”.

    Mr Johnson added that he supported an EU referendum – but warned that Britain’s problems will not be solved by simply leaving the EU as many of his Conservative colleagues apparently believed.

    The then Mayor of London asserted:

    “If we left the EU, we would end this sterile debate, and we would have to recognise that most of our problems are not caused by ‘Bwussels’, but by chronic British short-termism, inadequate management, sloth, low skills, a culture of easy gratification and underinvestment in both human and physical capital and infrastructure.”

    He added:

    “Why are we still, person for person, so much less productive than the Germans? That is now a question more than a century old, and the answer is nothing to do with the EU. In or out of the EU, we must have a clear vision of how we are going to be competitive in a global economy.”

    On February 21 2016 – four months before the referendum – Mr Johnson stunned the then Prime Minister, David Cameron, by announcing he was joining the campaign for Britain to leave the European Union.

    Winston Churchill’s grandson, Sir Nicholas Soames, immediately Tweeted: “Whatever my great friend Boris decides to do I know that he is NOT an outer.”

    Just two weeks previously, Mr Johnson had written in his Telegraph column:

    “It is also true that the single market is of considerable value to many UK companies and consumers, and that leaving would cause at least some business uncertainty, while embroiling the Government for several years in a fiddly process of negotiating new arrangements, so diverting energy from the real problems of this country – low skills, low social mobility, low investment etc – that have nothing to do with Europe.”

    Just before deciding to back the Leave campaign, Mr Johnson also penned a pro-Remain column for the Telegraph in which he wrote that Britain’s continued membership of the EU would be a “boon for the world and for Europe”.

    Johnson wrote of the EU: “This is a market on our doorstep, ready for further exploitation by British firms. The membership fee seems rather small for all that access. Why are we so determined to turn our back on it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    The quality seems to have dropped significantly since I came here, I guess you get what you pay for.
    "There is always a tweet. That has become accepted fact in the Trump presidency: For every pronouncement the President makes, there is at least one tweet from his past that directly contradicts his current view." -CNN

    I am Zippy and I approve of this post. But you don't have to.

  4. #3
    The Queen can still shut down Parliament if she wants to under advice from Boris.



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