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Thread: New Orleans flooding caused by 7 inches of sudden, strong rain

  1. #1

    New Orleans flooding caused by 7 inches of sudden, strong rain

    Neighborhoods across New Orleans were inundated with floodwaters Wednesday morning, with more than 7 inches of rain falling in some areas ahead of the storm forecasters now predict will become Hurricane Barry by the end of the week.
    In addition to the torrential rains, which left residents stranded or forced to rely on boats to get down flooded streets, the storm also brought lightning and thunder. Power was knocked out to 19,000 Entergy customers and a water spout was spotted over Lake Pontchartrain.
    As of noon Wednesday, the extent of the damage to homes, businesses and cars was still difficult to assess.
    Meanwhile, forecasts now suggest the storm could push enough of a storm surge to raise the Mississippi River to 20 feet in some parts of the metro area, higher than the lowest levees that keep it within its banks. That has never happened in the city's modern history.


    The storm dropped massive amounts of rainfall across the region. A rain gauge at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome recorded more than 7 inches of rain in six hours and radar estimates suggest other areas saw between 5 inches and 7 inches, said Michael Hill, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Slidell.
    Stations connected to the website Wunderground, which allows users to upload information from personal weather gauges, showed some areas receiving more than 9 inches of rain over the course of the morning. The website showed 11 inches falling in the Central Business District.

    More at: https://www.nola.com/news/article_e7...749f9d28a.html
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

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    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

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    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
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  3. #2
    Happens fairly often here lately . Someplace like that where you are due every hurricane season , every year I would not be living if it cannot hold 7 inches back .
    Do something Danke

  4. #3
    This is unacceptable, we must mandate a triple storm tax , NOW !!!

  5. #4
    Sucks for the people that live there.
    "Perhaps one of the most important accomplishments of my administration is minding my own business."

    Calvin Coolidge

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by oyarde View Post
    Happens fairly often here lately . Someplace like that where you are due every hurricane season , every year I would not be living if it cannot hold 7 inches back .
    After Katrina word should have gone out..live here at your own risk. No Fed insurance, no Fed levy building/repair. It's been 14 yrs. Camping 101. If you pitch your tent in a gully, and it rains, don't bitch if you get wet.

  7. #6
    Around 5 pm Thur. afternoon, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a new hurricane warning for parts of Louisiana coast ahead of Tropical Storm Barry's expected landfall this weekend.

    Barry transformed into a tropical storm earlier in the day on Thursday, is currently gaining momentum in the Gulf of Mexico about 85-90 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River, with sustained wind above 40 mph late Thursday evening. Hurricane models expected the tropical storm to traverse the northern Gulf of Mexico towards the Louisiana coast where it could make a direct hit as a Category 1 hurricane Friday night or Saturday between New Iberia and New Orleans.
    "Barry formed in the northern Gulf of Mexico Thursday and will continue to slowly move toward the central Gulf Coast into the weekend. Excessive wind shear has kept the system ragged and weak so far, but as atmospheric conditions improve into the weekend, the storm may take advantage of anomalously warm ocean waters and strengthen before making landfall in Louisiana. Rainfall and flooding will be the biggest risk with this system, with some data suggesting up to two feet of rain locally in southeastern Louisiana through the weekend," said Ed Vallee, meteorologist and owner of Empire Weather LLC.
    Rainfall and flooding will be the biggest threat to #Louisiana as #Barry approaches. 15-25" of rainfall is possible in SE Louisiana including #BatonRouge and #NewOrleans pic.twitter.com/slUAzYcoSb
    — Empire Weather LLC (@empirewx) July 11, 2019
    The storm is moving to the west at 5 mph and has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph - will make a hard right hook towards landfall in the next 12 to 18 hours. The minimum central pressure is now 1003 MB...29.62 inches.
    "Winds can be strong near where the system makes landfall which continues to be uncertain - most data suggests a landfall point along the central Louisiana coast, continuing northward into the Mississippi Delta. Wind speeds will depend on how much the storm can strengthen before landfall, but a strong tropical storm or category one hurricane with sustained wind of 70-80mph are possible. This can lead to damage to structures, downed limbs, and power outages," Vallee said.

    Vallee said weather models indicate the tropical storm could make landfall Saturday on the southeastern coast of Louisiana. He noted that Barry lacks the classic hurricane structure, but as it hooks right towards land on Friday - the storm could develop the traditional spin of a cyclonic storm.

    WOFL Orlando meteorologist Jayme King - said "Barry is going to produce a tremendous amount of rain. So, there's a lot of concern about flooding in New Orleans," King added, "The French quarter is notorious for having awful drainage. The city is already saturated, and the Mississippi River is already high... We're hoping they get through this okay."
    Whoa! The French Quarter is seeing significant flooding this morning. This was off Royal. @NWSNewOrleans
    ��: Colin Crumbley pic.twitter.com/94UylJrNf2
    — Payton Malone (@paytonmalonewx) July 10, 2019
    Biblical rains could undoubtedly be the biggest story of the weekend with total rain accumulations of 10 to 15 inches near and inland of the central Gulf Coast through the weekend.




    More at: https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-...arnings-issued
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  8. #7
    New Orleans is about to be hit by “an extreme rainfall event” that is likely to be the worst disaster that the city has seen since Hurricane Katrina.

    It is being projected that Tropical Storm Barry could officially become a hurricane before it makes landfall on Saturday, but in this case the wind speed is not really that important. Instead, the massive amount of rain that this immense storm will dump on southern Louisiana is the greatest danger, because the region is potentially facing flooding that is absolutely unprecedented. In fact, one weather expert is even warning that the flooding could be so dramatic that it might actually “change the course of American history”
    Weather expert Eric Holthaus warned that, while the impending disaster would be “an entirely different type” of flooding than 2005’s Katrina, it could be just as harmful – and might even “change the course of American history.”
    So why is there so much concern?
    Well, the NOAA is now projecting that some portions of southern Louisiana could get up to 25 inches of rain from this storm
    The NOAA Weather Prediction Center (WPC) upped its rainfall forecast for Barry on Thursday afternoon, calling for a pocket of 20-25” amounts near Barry’s track between Thursday and Sunday evening. It’s very unusual for a NOAA/WPC forecast to depict amounts above 20”, which testifies to the center’s high confidence in this extreme rainfall event.
    Many parts of New Orleans are already severely flooded, and if that amount of rain actually falls on the city over the next several days the water pumps are going to be completely overwhelmed.
    In addition, this is the very first time that New Orleans has ever had to deal with a tropical system when water levels on the Mississippi River are this high.
    According to CNN, the river is about 8 to 10 feet higher than it normally would be at this time of the year…
    Tropical Storm Barry presents New Orleans with an unprecedented problem, according to the National Weather Service.
    The Mississippi River, which is usually at 6 to 8 feet in midsummer in the Big Easy, is now at 16 feet, owing to record flooding that’s taken place this year all along the waterway.
    Tropical Storm Barry is going to produce a substantial storm surge, and normally that wouldn’t be too much of a problem, but in this case it could push the water level in the Mississippi River above the levee system that protects New Orleans. The following comes from the Daily Mail
    The center warned New Orleans residents that if the storm becomes a hurricane, it could potentially bring a coastal storm surge into the mouth of the Mississippi River capable of raising the river’s height to 20 feet above sea level – the highest crest in more than 90 years and high enough to overflow some sections of the levee system protecting the city.
    We are being told that authorities have “great confidence” in the levee system, but we all remember what happened during Hurricane Katrina.
    So basically New Orleans is facing a perfect recipe for flooding, and nobody is quite sure what is going to happen next. Already, a state of emergency has been declared in five parishes
    “Look, there are three ways that Louisiana floods: storm surge, high rivers and rain,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said Thursday. “We’re going to have all three.”
    States of emergency have been declared in Orleans, Jefferson, St. Bernard, Plaquemines and St. Charles parishes. Jefferson Parish and Plaquemines Parish have instituted mandatory evacuations as a precaution in low-lying areas or those outside major levees.
    And at this point, we don’t have to wonder if there will be “catastrophic flooding” in New Orleans, because some parts of the city are already under “3 to 4 feet of water” thanks to all of the rain that has already fallen…
    After Wednesday’s onslaught of heavy rain, Valerie Burton said her neighborhood looked like a lake outside her door.
    “There was about 3 to 4 feet of water in the street, pouring onto the sidewalks and at my door,” Burton said. “I went to my neighbors to alert them and tell them to move their cars.”
    Over the next few days things will get a lot worse for New Orleans.
    The only question is how much worse.
    And guess what? Once the storm leaves southern Louisiana, it is expected to head north directly through the heartland of America.
    Yes, the exact same area that has been relentlessly pounded by storm after storm for months.

    More at: https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-...al-proportions
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment



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