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Thread: Pfizer hid drug’s Alzheimer’s-preventing effects because it couldn’t profit from it

  1. #1

    Pfizer hid drug’s Alzheimer’s-preventing effects because it couldn’t profit from it

    A U.S. drug company did not openly share or perform further studies on a successful rheumatoid arthritis medicine that internal researchers suggested was reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease by 64 percent, according to Washington Post article published Tuesday.
    Researchers at Pfizer reportedly urged the firm to conduct a clinical trial after finding the potential hidden benefit of the anti-inflammatory drug Enbrel while analyzing insurance claims.
    It was estimated to cost $80 million to conduct the trial, and Pfizer decided to pass.
    Pfizer told the Post it did not pursue the clinical trial because its success rate would likely be low.
    Enbrel had reached the end of its patent life and its profits were dwindling, meaning it may have made little business sense to invest in the trial, according to the Post.
    Outside researchers said it would've helped the medical community for Pfizer to publish its findings, since doing so could have led to further discoveries about the complicated disease.
    “It would benefit the scientific community to have that data out there,’’ said Keenan Walker, an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins who is studying how inflammation contributes to Alzheimer’s. “Whether it was positive data or negative data, it gives us more information to make better informed decisions.’’

    More at: https://thehill.com/homenews/news/44...ilities-report
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  3. #2
    It proves one thing, if there is no money to be made, they could care less about people with a debilitating disease like alzheimer's.

    What scum. I am still pissed they promised a CT town counsel lots of money which forced people to move with eminent domain. Kelo Vs. New London.
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  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    It proves one thing, if there is no money to be made, they could care less about people with a debilitating disease like alzheimer's.

    What scum. I am still pissed they promised a CT town counsel lots of money which forced people to move with eminent domain. Kelo Vs. New London.
    If Big Pharma researched and recommended a new drug that was 68% effective would you recommend people use it?

  5. #4
    So it is an anti inflammatory for arthritis ?
    Do something Danke

  6. #5
    https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/...lzheimers.aspx

    5 Reasons Pfizer Sat on a Potential New Alzheimer's Drug


    Pfizer has made some bad decisions in the past that should make its shareholders, and the rest of us angry, but this is not one of them. Here are five good reasons Pfizer sat on data suggesting Enbrel, an aging rheumatoid arthritis drug, might also prevent Alzheimer's disease.

    1. It doesn't go where it needs to be

    Although we really don't know how Alzheimer's begins, we do know that it's a disease of the brain. Getting a drug to travel from the bloodstream and into the brain, though, is a lot harder than you might think.

    Enbrel is not a drug that crosses the blood-brain barrier, and it isn't supposed to. That's because it's a big protein that neutralizes tumor necrosis factor (TNF), an important gear in the mechanism that begins the inflammation process associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients generally exhibit way too much TNF activity, so taking an anti-TNF drug should return all systems to normal and halt the disease. For otherwise healthy patients, though, dialing down their immune systems with an anti-TNF drug can increase the risk of contracting uncontrollable infections. In other words, there's a good chance the FDA would never approve Enbrel, or any drug from this class, as a prophylactic treatment for healthy patients worried about developing Alzheimer's dementia.

    2. It's not an eye-opener

    Pfizer noticed insurance claim data in 2015 that suggested patients treated with Enbrel were 64% less likely to report Alzheimer's disease years later. Scientists in institutions around the globe were examining the role TNF might play in Alzheimer's disease years before researchers in the immunology department tried to convince management to test Enbrel as a treatment for dementia.

    Biopharmaceutical companies have spent untold billions of dollars trying to treat Alzheimer's by targeting plaques of protein fragments that are nearly always present in the brains of people with Alzheimer's and other dementias. Now that it's pretty clear that those plaques are a symptom and not the cause of dementia, however, more drugmakers are listening to scientists who think Alzheimer's is really an inflammatory disease but not enough to plow a lot of money into the concept.

    3. Insurance claim observations aren't a great indicator

    The trouble all started when an analysis of hundreds of thousands of insurance claims suggested rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with Enbrel were 64% less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than people who didn't receive Enbrel. Unfortunately, comparing populations that receive a drug with a five-figure annual price tag to populations that don't is problematic, to say the least.

    So few associations found in insurance claim data have been repeatable in a controlled clinical trial that they're largely ignored, just like this one was. If they were repeatable more often than not, cancer would have been extinguished from the planet years ago and I'd have a full head of hair. In other words, there's probably another explanation for the observed benefit.

    4. Clinical trials are expensive
    According to The Washington Post, researchers from the immunology department estimated the cost of running down this lead would only cost $80 million, or around $26,700 per person enrolled in a 3,000-patient study. Unfortunately, that estimate's much lower than the total cost to run a years-long study with thousands of patients.

    Clinical trials are generally performed in partnership with hospitals, which are not famous for charging reasonable prices. That means regular visits to receive an Enbrel injection and a battery of efficacy and safety measurements can really add up fast.

    Independent data monitors who crunch all the data clinical trials throw off don't work for peanuts, either. While $80 million might be enough to begin a clinical trial with thousands of patients randomized to receive Enbrel or a placebo over the course of several years. Once all is said and done, the company could easily drop a nine-figure sum just conducting a large study.

    5. It's not Pfizer's drug
    Enbrel originated with a company called Immunex, which had a deal with Wyeth to co-promote the drug in North America and allow Wyeth to market the drug everywhere else. In 2001, Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) bought Immunex and eight years later, Pfizer bought Wyeth.

    Although Pfizer inherited an exclusive license to market Enbrel outside of North America, Amgen still owns the patents. Unless Alzheimer's disease was one of the certain future indications Wyeth and Immunex agreed to work together on, the ball was in Amgen's court the whole time.

    The idea that TNF could play a role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease is old enough to vote. With this in mind, you'd think that companies earning billions with a TNF drug would have noticed and seriously considered the possibility at least a decade ago before deciding against it.

    This doesn't have to end here
    If you're going to ask senior management at a well-run company to blow at least $80 million on a clinical trial that has almost zero chance of success, you might as well ask them to torpedo their careers. That doesn't mean someone else can't pick up the torch.

    The Alzheimer's Association has invested $455 million on nearly 3,000 investigations over the past 37 years. There might not be enough research dollars in the public sector to conduct a trial with thousands of patients, but there are plenty of biosimilar versions of Enbrel available if any organization wants to try a smaller proof-of-concept study on its own.
    Enbrel is currently prices at over $5,000 a package which has four doses in it. https://www.goodrx.com/enbrel

    It suppresses the immune system (how it reduces inflammation in arthritis patients) which makes people more subjective to other infections. It is given by injection.
    Last edited by Zippyjuan; 06-06-2019 at 07:44 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    The quality seems to have dropped significantly since I came here, I guess you get what you pay for.
    "There is always a tweet. That has become accepted fact in the Trump presidency: For every pronouncement the President makes, there is at least one tweet from his past that directly contradicts his current view." -CNN

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  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by oyarde View Post
    So it is an anti inflammatory for arthritis ?
    It reduces inflammation by suppressing the immune system response to infections- meaning you are much more likely to get other infections and not fight them off like you normally would. People probably don't want to be suppressing their immune system if they don't have to.
    Last edited by Zippyjuan; 06-06-2019 at 07:51 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    The quality seems to have dropped significantly since I came here, I guess you get what you pay for.
    "There is always a tweet. That has become accepted fact in the Trump presidency: For every pronouncement the President makes, there is at least one tweet from his past that directly contradicts his current view." -CNN

    I am Zippy and I approve of this post. But you don't have to.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Schifference View Post
    If Big Pharma researched and recommended a new drug that was 68% effective would you recommend people use it?
    This wasn't a new drug. They knew it would help people with Alzheimer's but their patent was about to expire and they knew it was going to cost them a lot to further study, so they declined to help those people.

    One of the biggest problem with Big pHARMa is their lack of transparency and willingness to work with others. If there is no money to be made, it doesn't really concern them.
    My website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/

    "No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” ~ Charles Dickens

  9. #8



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  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    This wasn't a new drug. They knew it would help people with Alzheimer's but their patent was about to expire and they knew it was going to cost them a lot to further study, so they declined to help those people.

    One of the biggest problem with Big pHARMa is their lack of transparency and willingness to work with others. If there is no money to be made, it doesn't really concern them.
    You did not answer my question.

    This is concerning any drug not just the one here. So once again here is the question: If Big Pharma researched and recommended a new drug that was 68% effective would you recommend people use it?

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Schifference View Post
    You did not answer my question.

    This is concerning any drug not just the one here. So once again here is the question: If Big Pharma researched and recommended a new drug that was 68% effective would you recommend people use it?
    If your family had a history of Alzheimers, and you seen what it does to people when they forget who their family is or their kid's name, and your doctor said there was something that could make you 68% less likely to get Alzheimers would you take it?

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Schifference View Post
    You did not answer my question.

    This is concerning any drug not just the one here. So once again here is the question: If Big Pharma researched and recommended a new drug that was 68% effective would you recommend people use it?
    If they were more transparent and allow independent studies to come to their conclusions, I would recommend it with a caveat. Big pHARMa isn't in the business of curing anyone, they are in the business of treating a problem and having returning customers.
    My website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/

    "No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” ~ Charles Dickens

  14. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    If they were more transparent and allow independent studies to come to their conclusions, I would recommend it with a caveat. Big pHARMa isn't in the business of curing anyone, they are in the business of treating a problem and having returning customers.
    They make a hell of a lot less money with preventative medicine. It's caused the countless deaths of many.

  15. #13
    It seems like there are charity foundations dedicated to research in specific diseases that could perform the trials. The real complaint here is that the initial findings were not published so that researchers and experts had access to that information.
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  16. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    This wasn't a new drug. They knew it would help people with Alzheimer's but their patent was about to expire and they knew it was going to cost them a lot to further study, so they declined to help those people.

    One of the biggest problem with Big pHARMa is their lack of transparency and willingness to work with others. If there is no money to be made, it doesn't really concern them.
    Let's help people by shutting down most of their immune system. Would you like to take a drug which did that? If they approved for general use a drug which suppresses the immune system you would be claiming that BigPharma wants to kill people. The same drug you are now complaining they want to suppress.
    Last edited by Zippyjuan; 06-08-2019 at 11:53 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    The quality seems to have dropped significantly since I came here, I guess you get what you pay for.
    "There is always a tweet. That has become accepted fact in the Trump presidency: For every pronouncement the President makes, there is at least one tweet from his past that directly contradicts his current view." -CNN

    I am Zippy and I approve of this post. But you don't have to.

  17. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Let's help people by shutting down most of their immune system. Would you like to take a drug which did that?
    But...but...Big pHARMa would not do anything to harm people, right? Doctors have been prescribing Enbrel® to people for years who have Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which is an autoimmune disease.
    My website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/

    "No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” ~ Charles Dickens

  18. #16
    tadalafil – a Viagra-like drug that treats erectile dysfunction – can increase blood flow to the deep vessels within the brain.

    Neutrophil Adhesion in Brain Capillaries Reduces Cortical Blood Flow and Impairs Memory Function in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models,"


    What do we already know?

    Vascular dementia is the second most-prevalent cause of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. Increasingly, it is clear that changes to blood vessels within the brain interact with Alzheimer's disease, to worsen the disease and speed cognitive decline.

    The main cause of vascular dementia in older people is cerebral small vessel disease – disease in the tiny blood vessels that supply brain cells with oxygen and nutrients. Small vessel disease makes artery walls become thick and stiff, which prevents them from responding to the brain's changing needs for blood.

    The result is damage to deep parts of the brain due to insufficient blood supply.

    People probably adapt to the decreased blood flow, so that they don't feel dizzy all of the time, but there's clear evidence that it impacts cognitive function," said Chris Schaffer, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Cornell University.

    A new study from the joint lab of Schaffer and associate professor Nozomi Nishimura, offers an explanation for this dramatic blood flow decrease: white blood cells stuck to the inside of capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in the brain. And while only a small percentage of capillaries experience this blockage, each stalled vessel leads to decreased blood flow in multiple downstream vessels, magnifying the impact on overall brain blood flow.

    Their paper, "Neutrophil Adhesion in Brain Capillaries Reduces Cortical Blood Flow and Impairs Memory Function in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models," published in Nature Neuroscience.

    The paper's co-lead authors are Jean Cruz-Hernandez, Ph.D., now a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard Medical School, and Oliver Bracko, a research associate in the Schaffer-Nishimura Lab.

    The paper, Schaffer said, is the culmination of approximately a decade of study, data gathering and analysis. It began with a study in which Nishimura was attempting to put clots into the vasculatures of Alzheimer's mouse brains to see their effect.

    "It turns out that ... the blockages we were trying to induce were already in there," she said. "It sort of turned the research around - this is a phenomenon that was already happening."

    Recent studies suggest that brain blood flow deficits are one of the earliest detectable symptoms of dementia.

    "What we've done is identify the cellular mechanism that causes reduced brain blood flow in Alzheimer's disease models, which is neutrophils [white blood cells] sticking in capillaries," Schaffer said. "We've shown that when we block the cellular mechanism [that causes the stalls], we get an improved blood flow, and associated with that improved blood flow is immediate restoration of cognitive performance of spatial- and working-memory tasks."

    "Now that we know the cellular mechanism," he said, "it's a much narrower path to identify the drug or the therapeutic approach to treat it."

    The team has identified approximately 20 drugs, many of them already FDA approved for human use, that have potential in dementia therapy and are screening these drugs in Alzheimer's mice now.

    Schaffer said he's "super-optimistic" that, if the same capillary-blocking mechanism is at play in humans as it is in mice, this line of research "could be a complete game-changer for people with Alzheimer's disease."
    Last edited by nikcers; 06-07-2019 at 11:29 AM.



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  20. #17
    a working mechanism is whuts important here!

    good luck science, I mean that sincerely.

    why I should worship the state (who apparently is the only party that can possess guns without question).
    The state's only purpose is to kill and control. Why do you worship it? - Sola_Fide

    Baptiste said.
    At which point will Americans realize that creating an unaccountable institution that is able to pass its liability on to tax-payers is immoral and attracts sociopaths?



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