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Thread: New Facebook Lawsuit Suggests ‘Another Cambridge Analytica’ Has Come To Light

  1. #1

    New Facebook Lawsuit Suggests ‘Another Cambridge Analytica’ Has Come To Light

    Just a few hours after meeting French President Emmanuel Macron to discuss the ways in which the company can become more accountable for the content published on its platform, and just a few days after Facebook's co-founder Chris Hughes slammed the company and its CEO for what they have become, the company quietly announced on Friday that another Cambridge Analytica may have come to light.
    "Today Facebook filed a lawsuit in California state court against Rankwave, a South Korean data analytics company that ran apps on the Facebook platform," the company announced, under the heading "Enforcing Our Platform Policies."
    TechCrunch obtained a copy of the lawsuit and said that it "centers around Rankwave offering to help businesses build a Facebook authorization step into their apps so they can pass all the user data to Rankwave, which then analyzes biographic and behavioral traits to supply user contact info and ad targeting assistance to the business."

    Rankwave's business model has echoes of Cambridge Analytica, where personality quizzes were used to build complex algorithms that targeted users and their circles of friends with highly-targeted ads. These ads were designed to shape voting behavior, amongst other things.
    Facebook has accused Rankwave of using more than 30 apps to track and analyze comments and likes. They also have an app to track the popularity of a user's posts, calculating a 'social influence score'. That app is still available on the Google Play Store at the time of writing.


    One of the major criticisms of Facebook over Cambridge Analytica was their delayed response. And 'delayed' might be a benevolent description. 'Reluctant' might be more apt. The company denied any exec-level knowledge of what was taking place on their platform, but this was undermined when reports of undisclosed meetings were exposed.
    The Cambridge Analytica scandal is at the heart of the expected multi-billion-dollar FTC fine and the various criminal investigations taking place in the U.S. It was also, along with the torrent of inappropriate content that has come to light, responsible for the bow wave of regulation now coming into play worldwide. Cue that meeting with President Macron.
    "We need new rules for the internet that will spell out the responsibilities of companies and those of governments," Zuckerberg said in an interview with a French TV channel after meeting the French President.
    "Worryingly,' writes TechCrunch, "Facebook didn’t reach out to Rankwave until January 2019 for information proving it complied with the social network’s policies. After receiving no response, Facebook issued a cease-and-desist order in February, which Rankwave replied to seeking more time because it’s CTO had resigned, which Facebook calls 'false representations'. Later that month, Rankwave denied violating Facebook’s policies but refused to provide proof. Facebook gave it more time to provide proof, but Rankwave didn’t respond. Facebook has now shut down Rankwave’s apps."
    More echoes of Cambridge Analytica.
    According to Facebook, the company "was investigating Rankwave’s data practices in relation to its advertising and marketing services. Rankwave failed to cooperate with our efforts to verify their compliance with our policies, which we require of all developers using our platform. Facebook has already suspended apps and accounts associated with Rankwave, and today’s suit asks the court to enforce the basic cooperation terms that Rankwave agreed to in exchange for the opportunity to operate apps on the platform."
    Earlier in the week, two U.S. senators penned an open letter to the Federal Trade Commission, demanding that the imminent sanctions against Facebook go much further than the "bargain" $3 billion to $5 billion fine that is expected. The senators wrote, "to urge the Commission to act swiftly to conclude its investigation of Facebook, and to move to compel sweeping changes to end the social network's pattern of misuse and abuse of personal data."
    "The FTC must set a resounding precedent that is heard by Facebook and any other tech company that disregards the law in a rapacious quest for growth," they said, arguing that fines are insufficient. "The FTC should impose long-term limits on Facebook's collection and use of personal information, [this might include rules] on what Facebook can do with consumers' private information, such as requiring the deletion of tracking data, restricting the collection of certain types of information, curbing advertising practices, and imposing a firewall on sharing private data between different products."
    This is exactly the kind of 'don't act until you have to' attitude they had in mind.

    More at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/zakdoff.../#20ae8ce24428
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    Just a few hours after meeting French President Emmanuel Macron to discuss the ways in which the company can become more accountable for the content published on its platform, and just a few days after Facebook's co-founder Chris Hughes slammed the company and its CEO for what they have become, the company quietly announced on Friday that another Cambridge Analytica may have come to light.
    "Today Facebook filed a lawsuit in California state court against Rankwave, a South Korean data analytics company that ran apps on the Facebook platform," the company announced, under the heading "Enforcing Our Platform Policies."
    TechCrunch obtained a copy of the lawsuit and said that it "centers around Rankwave offering to help businesses build a Facebook authorization step into their apps so they can pass all the user data to Rankwave, which then analyzes biographic and behavioral traits to supply user contact info and ad targeting assistance to the business."

    Rankwave's business model has echoes of Cambridge Analytica, where personality quizzes were used to build complex algorithms that targeted users and their circles of friends with highly-targeted ads. These ads were designed to shape voting behavior, amongst other things.
    Facebook has accused Rankwave of using more than 30 apps to track and analyze comments and likes. They also have an app to track the popularity of a user's posts, calculating a 'social influence score'. That app is still available on the Google Play Store at the time of writing.


    One of the major criticisms of Facebook over Cambridge Analytica was their delayed response. And 'delayed' might be a benevolent description. 'Reluctant' might be more apt. The company denied any exec-level knowledge of what was taking place on their platform, but this was undermined when reports of undisclosed meetings were exposed.
    The Cambridge Analytica scandal is at the heart of the expected multi-billion-dollar FTC fine and the various criminal investigations taking place in the U.S. It was also, along with the torrent of inappropriate content that has come to light, responsible for the bow wave of regulation now coming into play worldwide. Cue that meeting with President Macron.
    "We need new rules for the internet that will spell out the responsibilities of companies and those of governments," Zuckerberg said in an interview with a French TV channel after meeting the French President.
    "Worryingly,' writes TechCrunch, "Facebook didn’t reach out to Rankwave until January 2019 for information proving it complied with the social network’s policies. After receiving no response, Facebook issued a cease-and-desist order in February, which Rankwave replied to seeking more time because it’s CTO had resigned, which Facebook calls 'false representations'. Later that month, Rankwave denied violating Facebook’s policies but refused to provide proof. Facebook gave it more time to provide proof, but Rankwave didn’t respond. Facebook has now shut down Rankwave’s apps."
    More echoes of Cambridge Analytica.
    According to Facebook, the company "was investigating Rankwave’s data practices in relation to its advertising and marketing services. Rankwave failed to cooperate with our efforts to verify their compliance with our policies, which we require of all developers using our platform. Facebook has already suspended apps and accounts associated with Rankwave, and today’s suit asks the court to enforce the basic cooperation terms that Rankwave agreed to in exchange for the opportunity to operate apps on the platform."
    Earlier in the week, two U.S. senators penned an open letter to the Federal Trade Commission, demanding that the imminent sanctions against Facebook go much further than the "bargain" $3 billion to $5 billion fine that is expected. The senators wrote, "to urge the Commission to act swiftly to conclude its investigation of Facebook, and to move to compel sweeping changes to end the social network's pattern of misuse and abuse of personal data."
    "The FTC must set a resounding precedent that is heard by Facebook and any other tech company that disregards the law in a rapacious quest for growth," they said, arguing that fines are insufficient. "The FTC should impose long-term limits on Facebook's collection and use of personal information, [this might include rules] on what Facebook can do with consumers' private information, such as requiring the deletion of tracking data, restricting the collection of certain types of information, curbing advertising practices, and imposing a firewall on sharing private data between different products."
    This is exactly the kind of 'don't act until you have to' attitude they had in mind.

    More at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/zakdoff.../#20ae8ce24428
    Wow, that's really unexpected.

  4. #3
    What amazes me is that after all the crap that has come to light and been published/reported, people still use Facebook.
    I compiled a "brief" history of events since October 2008 that are defining the global currency war and the role that gold is playing:

    Tin Foil Hats, Economic Reality and the Total Perspective Vortex

    Also, have you contacted your Congressional Rep and asked them co-sponsor Ron Paul's Rep. Paul Broun Jr.'s HR 1098 77: Free Competition in Currencies Act?

  5. #4
    On 10 May, Facebook announced:
    Today Facebook filed a lawsuit in California state court against Rankwave, a South Korean data analytics company that ran apps on the Facebook platform. Facebook was investigating Rankwave’s data practices in relation to its advertising and marketing services. Rankwave failed to cooperate with our efforts to verify their compliance with our policies, which we require of all developers using our platform.

    Facebook has already suspended apps and accounts associated with Rankwave, and today’s suit asks the court to enforce the basic cooperation terms that Rankwave agreed to in exchange for the opportunity to operate apps on the platform.

    By filing the lawsuit, we are sending a message to developers that Facebook is serious about enforcing our policies, including requiring developers to cooperate with us during an investigation.
    Facebook has accused the South Korean Rankwave of using at least 30 apps to track and analyse comments and likes. Facebook demands $9.8 million for the value of the data and to cover the legal fees, Facebook also requested an injunction to prohibit Rankwave from accessing Facebook, to allow Facebook’s audit, and delete all Facebook data.
    Rankwave is accused of misusing Facebook data, delaying to respond to a cease-and-desist order, lying about not violating Facebook policy and not using its apps since 2018 when they were still accessed in April 2019, and refusing to comply with a mandatory audit.

    Rankwave had a consumer app that asked for consent to provide a "social influence score". Then it would pull data about Facebook activity like location checkins. Until 2015, this kind of app could also access the data on their Facebook friends.
    Rankwave used the user data to for targeted advertisements. If the location checkins showed checking into a baseball stadium, for example, Rankwave for a price would help clients target these with ads for baseball tickets.
    Rankwave describes how it extracts contact info for ad targeting data from Facebook data.


    Isn´t it strange that Rankwave was openly selling these services for years before Facebook took action? Only in January 2019, Facebook first asked Rankwave for proof it complied with its “policies”. After receiving no response, Facebook issued a cease-and-desist order in February.
    According to Facebook, Rankwave has been illegally using this information since 2014, "for its own business purposes, which include providing consulting services to advertisers and marketing companies".
    Would it simply be allowed if a company paid Facebook for this data to be used or only if Facebook sells the information itself?

    Rankwave still offers an Android app that asks you to login with Facebook so it can assess your posts to give you a “Social Influencer Score”: https://techcrunch.com/2019/05/10/fa...kwave-lawsuit/
    Do NOT ever read my posts.
    Google and Yahoo wouldn’t block them without a very good reason: http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...he-world/page2

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Bern View Post
    What amazes me is that after all the crap that has come to light and been published/reported, people still use Facebook.
    People are petitioning the government to force Facebook to allow them to use Facebook.
    Quote Originally Posted by dannno View Post
    Trump - accidentally killing a few children in the fight against Islamic extremism so Soros doesn't murder thousands of children
    Quote Originally Posted by dannno View Post
    Trump hasn't even been in 6 months, you can't call him a boondoggle President unless he has overseen a military boondoggle for at least a year or two.
    Quote Originally Posted by dannno View Post
    When Donald Trump talks about torture, I don't know what he really believes for sure, but he gets attacked on what he says unjustly by the media and many people here

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCount View Post
    People are petitioning the government to force Facebook to allow them to use Facebook.

    That's funny from someone who voted for Obama twice. And regularly crusades against Ron and Rand.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCount View Post
    ...I believe that when the government is capable of doing a thing, it will.
    Quote Originally Posted by Influenza View Post
    which one of yall fuckers wrote the "ron paul" racist news letters
    Quote Originally Posted by Dforkus View Post
    Zippy's posts are a great contribution.




    Disrupt, Deny, Deflate. Read the RPF trolls' playbook here (post #3): http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...eptive-members



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