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Thread: MAGA turns heat on China: Daughter of Huawei founder/CFO arrested over Iran sanctions

  1. #31
    Just a few days after Cisco "erroneously" advised its employees to avoid non-essential travel to China, Beijing has returned the favor, and according to the SCMP, Chinese researchers working in sensitive hi-tech sectors have been warned not to take any unnecessary trips to the United States "as unease grows in the business community following the arrest of a tech executive in Canada."
    Workers at a research agency who can't avoid crossing the Pacific were also told in an internal memo that if they did have to travel to the US, they should remove any sensitive information from their mobile phones and laptops, the SCMP reported citing an anonymous source. The soft travel ban is the result of tensions following the arrest of Huawei Technologies CFO Sabrina Meng Wanzhou in Canada, who despite being released on bail was not allowed to leave the country.
    The South China Morning Post reported last month that the US embassy in Beijing had revoked 10-year multiple-entry visas issued to some researchers specialising in China-US relations at government-backed institutions without explanation amid tightened visa scrutiny. Some researchers also had their computers and mobile phones subjected to checks by US customs officers.

    More at: https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-...-its-essential
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment



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  3. #32
    What does NOT make sense is that the arrest happened on Saturday and markets did not find out about it until Wednesday night. Let’s try out one of those equivalence narratives so popular in the business press. If Google’s global CFO had been detained in Hong Kong for extradition to China, would the world have waited five days to find out? This is where what had to be a massive conspiracy of silence begins to raise some interesting questions.
    U.S. prosecutors are never shy about their victories. Their detention of Meng is a BIG story – it sends the message that not even the rich and well connected are immune from prosecution under the sanctions regime. Since those who violate the sanctions are at least well paid and well connected and not mere bank tellers, getting this message across is crucial. Our bet is that Bolton (or someone else) told them to keep the story under wraps, probably to protect the trade negotiations, not sabotage them.
    If Huawei were an American company, it would have been legally obligated to announce the detention of its CFO. That is a material fact that must be disclosed promptly. Chinese security laws are enforced in a more “flexible” way. But why wouldn’t the Chinese government want the information out if they are really so furious as they appear to be in the last few days? Something really begins to smell at this point.
    Then along comes a story in the South China Morning Post about an October meeting with employees in which Meng said that there are cases where, “the external rules are clear-cut and there’s no contention, but the company is totally unable to comply with in actual operations. In such cases, after a reasonable decision-making process, one may accept the risk of temporary non-compliance.”
    That statement is full of euphemisms, but it makes putting the corporate interest ahead of complying with the law the official position of management. Put that in the context of a four-year anti-corruption campaign by Xi and a purge of top-level tech executives who have gotten too big for their britches. In Xi’s new world it may be one thing to have said that it was ok to put China’s interests first, but she is putting the corporate interests ahead of China’s interests.
    Also note that these comments were in quotes from an internal (and closed) Huawei meeting. How did the SCMP acquire these direct quotes? The SCMP is one of the world’s truly great papers, publishing candid news and commentary focused on getting to the truth in a way that is only a distant memory in American newspapers. That said, it is also like Hong Kong – one nation, two systems. If Beijing really wanted a story out, it would provide the sources and the reporters would do the rest. And if they really wanted a story spiked it probably would be spiked. Those direct quotes obviously came from Chinese authorities and the story was printed at a very inconvenient time for Meng – when she was protesting her innocence. Somebody in Beijing thinks Meng is a loose cannon.
    Then there is the apparently bellicose Chinese reaction largely in the internal Chinese press. Any country is obligated to protest the detention of one of its leading citizens and to let its citizens know that it is loudly protesting. But consider a Friday story from the SCMP written by Zhou Xin, the head of the political economy section at the paper. “China has separated the arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer Sabrina Meng Wanzhou from trade talks between Beijing and Washington" Gao Feng, a spokesman for the Ministry of Commerce, said on Thursday that he had no information at all about Meng’s case. Gao also said China was confident about reaching a trade deal with the United States within the 90-day truce agreed by the two sides in Argentina last weekend. Separately, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang also refused to directly link the arrest of Meng – in Canada last Saturday at the request of the United States – with the trade negotiations.” That is an authoritative story outlining the official Chinese position.
    Let’s be a little conspiratorial or, more precisely, try and create a narrative that fits the facts. It arguably serves everyone’s interests for Ms. Meng to be taught a lesson. It is in Bolton’s and the DoJ’s interest to send a message that access to power
    and connections does not buy you a get out of jail free card. It is in Xi’s interest, or at least in the interests of major portions of the Chinese government, to send a signal that even the extremely well-connected still have to toe the party line.
    The detention did not involve any surprises. The charges against Meng were leveled three months before her arrest. The market reaction seemed to be based on the notion that this was a last-minute surprise. As for the Chinese, Xi and Company knows where everyone is going and when. They certainly knew that Meng was traveling to Vancouver, that she had a warrant for her arrest outstanding, and that Canada extradites to the U.S. They did nothing to warn her.
    Why put Canada in the middle of it all? That one is easy. Plausible deniability. China can yell and scream about how horrible it is that America (via Canada) is detaining one of its leading citizens. It can plant stories to scare American executives that China will do the same thing to them and that Trump is the culprit. If she steps on American soil, then the negotiability of her fate ends. The machinery of the American justice system takes over. If Trump were to get involved then incoming House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff could call it “obstruction of justice” and an “impeachable offense,” based on his current standards regarding those terms.
    Friday was a bail hearing in a Vancouver court. The government maintains she is a flight risk. She could easily hop on a private jet at some small airport in British Columbia and be gone before anyone knew. The $1 million bail figure her defense is proposing is a tiny fraction of a tiny fraction of her family’s net worth. Her defense maintains that “face” matters a lot and not only would she lose face by fleeing she would cause China to lose face as well. All of this was said with a straight face. The judge took all this under advisement and the bail hearing will continue on Monday. Meng spends the weekend in jail and maybe longer. Our conspiracy theory holds that she will be released when everyone thinks the lesson has been learned. America scores a win in terms of signal value about enforcing Iran sanctions whether Meng spends two weeks, two months, or the rest of her life behind bars. Xi will have signaled what he thinks about prioritizing corporate interests over national interests and bending regulations. The most elegant way to have it happen would be to give her bail and let her hop on that jet. She loses face and has sharp limits on her future ability to travel. But that may be too clever by half.
    One does not have to buy this conspiracy theory in all its detail to get at the essential truth that markets need to digest. Meng’s arrest is not going to affect the outcome of the trade talks. Xi (and China) have too much of a stake in this to let the antics of a close friend’s naughty daughter stand in the way of him getting what he wants. And once an example is made, America also has too much to lose.
    The Meng affair is going to be just one of many bumps in the road between here and a trade deal. This is one reason why we view the 90-day time table as “aspirational.” Market participants that got so worked up about Meng probably do not have the stomach to make the whole journey to a deal. In the geopolitical world, Meng affairs do not happen every day but they do happen every six weeks or so. In that sense, having a “puke” now may be therapeutic. It gets it out of the way. Finally, a note to the Fed: even if the market is puking because of Meng, you do not give the patient something that is going to make it sicker. And do remember that it began vomiting long before Ms. Meng came to Vancouver and for entirely different reasons.
    * **
    As a reminder, on Tuesday afternoon Meng was granted bail for C$10 million, and has surrendered her Chinese and Hong Kong passports while being surrounding by security at all times, making it difficult to flee to China; difficult, but not wholly impossible.

    More at: https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-...snt-make-sense
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment



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  5. #33
    The Deep State Has Destroyed Trump’s Chances Of A Trade Deal With China, And The Stock Market Is Tanking As A Result

    http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/a...ng-as-a-result

    Somebody out there apparently does not want President Trump to make a trade deal with China. Just after U.S. and Chinese officials agreed to suspend the implementation of new tariffs for 90 days, one of China’s most important tech executives was literally kidnapped as she was changing planes in Canada. Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou was simply on her way to Mexico, but at the urging of U.S. authorities the Canadians grabbed her and are refusing to let her go. Reportedly, the plan is to extradite her to the United States where she will apparently face charges relating to Huawei’s evasion of U.S. sanctions against Iran. When Trump was negotiating face to face with the Chinese, he was not aware that this was taking place. So now all of Trump’s hard work is out the window, and our relations with the Chinese are probably the worst that they have been since the Korean War.

    If U.S. authorities wanted to punish Huawei, they should have just slapped a big fine on them and have been done with it.

    The Chinese would have been annoyed, but not that much damage would have been done.

    But kidnapping a high profile member of Chinese tech loyalty and throwing her in prison is something that the Chinese will not forgive.

    The Chinese are a deeply nationalistic people, and the kidnapping of Meng Wanzhou is being treated as a grave national insult in China. If the goal of the Deep State was to really upset the Chinese, they picked a perfect target. The following comes from Robert Wenzel…

    “This is a really big deal. Ms. Meng is by birth and position a member of China’s corporate royalty,” David Mulroney, a former Canadian ambassador to China, is quoted by TGM as having said.

    According to TGM, Meng, 46, who also goes by the name Sabrina, was appointed CFO of Huawei in 2011 and is also one of four deputy chairs. She appears to be being groomed for the top job at Shenzhen-based Huawei, which is now the world’s second-largest maker of telecommunications equipment.

    Just imagine how Americans would feel if China kidnapped a high profile member of our tech royalty and multiply that outrage by about 10.

    Until Meng Wanzhou is let go, there is not going to be any deal with China. Many Americans are not familiar with Huawei, but they are essentially China’s version of Apple or Microsoft. The following originally comes from CNN…

    Huawei is one of the world’s biggest makers of smartphones and networking equipment. It is at the heart of China’s ambitions to reduce its reliance on foreign technology and become an innovation powerhouse in its own right.

    The country is pumping hundreds of billions into its “Made in China 2025” plan, which aims to make China a global leader in industries such as robotics, electric cars and computer chips. The introduction of 5G wireless technology, which hinges on Huawei, is a top priority.

    Meng Wanzhou is not just the CFO of the company. She is also the daughter of the founder of the company and she is considered to be a hero by millions of Chinese.

    So what in the world is the Deep State thinking? Are we going to start regularly kidnapping individuals that work for foreign corporations that have somehow violated U.S. laws?

    And should Americans expect the same treatment? How would you like it if your mother or daughter was kidnapped while changing planes in a foreign country because the company that she works for had committed some sort of violation?

    I don’t want to make it sound like Huawei is perfectly innocent, because they aren’t. But this is a move that is not just going to ensure a nightmarish trade war with China. Ultimately, things could get a whole lot worse than that.

    At this point, the Chinese have summoned the U.S. ambassador and have formally demanded Meng Wanzhou’s release…

    The Chinese foreign ministry on Sunday summoned U.S. Ambassador to China Terry Branstad to protest the detention of a senior tech executive by the Canadian authorities “at the unreasonable behest of the United States.”

    Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng demanded the release of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, who is accused by U.S. officials of attempting to circumvent U.S. sanctions on Iran.

    It would be wonderful if Meng Wanzhou was released, but it doesn’t look like that is going to happen.

    So now our relationship with China is officially in the toilet, and this is one of the factors that could push stock prices much lower once again this week. In fact, as I write this article Dow futures are way down…

    U.S. stock futures fell on Sunday night as traders feared an intensifying trade war between the United States and China.

    Dow Jones Industrial Average futures dropped 197 points, implying a decline of 173.95 points at Monday’s open. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures also declined. The losses would add to a steep decline from last week.

    This current “correction” was supposed to be over by the time December rolled around, but instead stock prices accelerated their decline last week.

    And many of those that work in financial circles are starting to use language that is much more pessimistic than we have become accustomed to seeing. Here is just one example…

    “We’re very mindful once again where we’re at in the cycle,” Gregory Carmichael, chief executive of the Cincinnati-based lender Fifth Third, said at a conference last week. “We’re well positioned to deal with the downturn in the economy, and we’ll be very cautious.”

    I don’t know what “well positioned to deal with the downturn in the economy” means exactly, but it sounds nice.

    It frustrates me that so few people seem to understand the gravity of the situation that we are facing. Our stores are filled with cheap products that come from China and they own more than a trillion dollars of our national debt. The two largest economies in the entire world are decoupling from one another, and if the Chinese conclude that they are not able to salvage the relationship then they will rapidly become an exceedingly dangerous enemy.

    This is a major turning point, and the kidnapping of Meng Wanzhou has put us on a road that doesn’t lead anywhere good. Hopefully things can rapidly be fixed, because if not, events are likely to start escalating quite dramatically.


  6. #34
    https://www.sovereignman.com/trends/...0181128_socsec

    The anti-terrorism unit suited up.

    This was an international affair… a deal between the USA and New Zealand, two members of the Five Eyes intelligence alliance.

    Helicopters, tactical suits, high caliber firearms—the whole shebang. They busted in the doors and successfully raided the multi-million-dollar compound.

    What was this… capturing the next in line after Bin Laden? Busting an international human trafficking ring?

    Did you know? You can receive all our actionable articles straight to your email inbox... Click here to signup for our Notes from the Field newsletter.
    Actually, elite New Zealand law enforcement was acting at the request of the United States to arrest a guy named Kim Dotcom.

    Kim Dotcom is a large, jovial man of German-Swedish origins. He founded Megaupload, an online platform that allowed us to basically watch movies online for free.

    Unfortunately for Kim, a lot of that content included American movies, with American copyrights.

    US artists didn’t get their money, which meant the US government didn’t get its tax dollars.

    But Kim Dotcom was a German citizen hanging out in New Zealand. So tough luck for the USA, right?

    Wrong. US jurisdiction extends globally… and the government is getting its pound of flesh.

    Violate US copyright laws, and get your door kicked in by a SWAT team, even half a world away.

    Then there was the Australian, living in London who shared leaked, classified and sensitive documents with the public.

    I’m talking about the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange.

    He walked into the Ecuadorian embassy in London six years ago, asking for asylum.

    There was a Swedish warrant out for his arrest, alleging rape charges. He faced extradition to Sweden, and feared he would then be turned over to US authorities… who wanted Assange taken down for exposing the extent of the spying the US government was carrying out on its own citizens.

    For years it was suspected that there was a sealed US indictment against Assange. Last month, the proof emerged when the US accidentally revealed the filing, but not the specific charges.

    So, we’ve got a Aussie journalist who might get arrested in the UK (which has an extradition agreement with the US) for a crime allegedly committed in Sweden… all because the US government has a hard on for this guy.

    But this journalist made the mistake of providing the world with the valuable insight that the authoritarian US government was surveilling its own citizens.

    And, again, the US wants its pound of flesh.

    Just recently, the US has once again flexed its global might to throw someone in jail.

    As you’re likely aware, Trump is in the middle of some tense trade war negotiations with China.

    Interesting timing that the Chief Financial Officer of the Chinese tech company Huawei, Meng Wanzhou, was just arrested at the request of US authorities. The company allegedly violated US sanctions against Iran by selling technology to the country.

    But here’s the thing… Wanzhou wasn’t on American soil. She was arrested in Canada. The Canadian government is bringing the US case against Wanzhou, who could be extradited to the US to face charges.

    So a Chinese citizen, working for a Chinese company, complying with Chinese law, was arrested on Canadian soil… because she allegedly violated US law.
    Is there any part of the world which isn't in the jurisdiction of the totalitarian U.S. government?
    Last edited by acptulsa; 12-14-2018 at 08:35 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by angelatc View Post
    There's not a liberty lover on the planet who isn't called a liberal by the right, and a con by the left.

  7. #35
    Days after revealing that businessman Michael Spavor - who became the second Canadian citizen detained in China since Beijing warned it would retaliate against Canada for the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver earlier this month - had been arrested for "threatening national security", the Communist Party made clear that this is only the beginning, and that Canada should expect "further escalation" as Beijing has no intentions of backing down - and every intention of sending a message to US allies that they should stay out of the still-simmering dispute between the world's two largest economies.

    Via an editorial in the Global Times, an English-language Chinese media company considered to be a mouthpiece for the Communist Party, China accused Canada and other US allies of forming "a collective encirclement and suppression of Chinese high-tech enterprise Huawei" - likely a reference to the US's campaign to convince its allies to avoid Huawei equipment, citing its vulnerability to Chinese spies, as well as Canada's cooperation in Meng's detention - the editorial "suggested" that China should leverage its economic heft to deter US allies from taking actions contrary to China's interest.
    By calling on its allies, the US has gradually formed a collective encirclement and suppression of Chinese high-tech enterprise Huawei. It is a wicked precedent.
    Almost all US allies maintain active economic and trade ties with China, of which China is the biggest trading partner of many of them. China needs to urge these countries to keep neutral in the conflict between Washington and Beijing.
    It is possible for China to achieve this goal to a considerable extent because China does not threaten the strategic security of the US and its allies and it is more conducive for them to pursue national interests by maintaining good ties with China than to follow the hard line of the US.
    And if these countries continue to work against China to appease the US, China should not hesitate to retaliate.
    However, this does not mean that Beijing will capitulate to them at every step. For those countries that seek to ingratiate themselves to the US without regard to China's interests, China should firmly fight back, causing a heaving price for them.
    Though China should carefully pick and choose when to accommodate these intrusions and when to react, the editorial resolutely stated that Canada had "crossed a line" by detaining Meng.
    Canada crossed the line by helping the US detain an executive of Huawei and China needs to clearly express that it doesn't accept it. If Canada were to ultimately extradite Meng Wanzhou to the US, it would certainly be at the cost of a backslide in China-Canada ties.
    In addition, it would be a test for China's national will and wisdom to decide when to accommodate certain countries for decisions made while being caught between China and the US, and when to resolutely counter their damage to China's interests.
    The editorial goes on to suggest that perhaps if China had taken a harder line against Australia when it became the first country to accept the US's advice and ban Huawei's equipment, other countries (like, maybe, Canada) would have thought twice about interfering.
    Australia was the first to follow Washington in blocking Huawei devices. As Wu Xinbo, a scholar of Fudan University, pointed out in an interview with the Global Times, "If China firmly fought back on Australia's decisions, other countries might think twice before considering calling off Huawei's products."
    China certainly will not overact, because such a move will isolate China and construct the outcome the US prefers. Beijing needs to meticulously select counter-targets to really make them learn a lesson.
    When weighing retaliation against the US, China must focus on participants in the "Five Eyes" intelligence alliance - particularly Canada, Australia and New Zealand. As we've previously reported, infiltrating the "Five Eyes" cabal has long been a focus for Chinese intelligence services.


    More at: https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-...onflict-canada
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankind…it’s people I can’t stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

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