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Thread: Trump Disavows Nuclear Deal and Denounces Iranian Leadership

  1. #1

    Trump Disavows Nuclear Deal and Denounces Iranian Leadership

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/13/u...lear-deal.html

    Says Iran violating "spirit" of the deal, not that they violated the actual agreement. It doesn't end the agreement but if the US imposes sanctions, it might be considered to be in violation of the agreement- not Iran. Congress required the President to "certify" compliance every 90 days (it isn't part of the actual agreement). He has basically put the focus on Congress now to decide if the US will stick with the deal or not. Trump has called the Iran deal the worst deal the US has ever entered into. But he has said the same about almost every treaty. Walking away from the agreement could make any deal with Korea even more difficult (such a deal is extremely unlikely anyways).


    WASHINGTON — President Trump on Friday made good on a long-running threat to disavow the Iran nuclear deal that was negotiated by his predecessor, Barack Obama. But he stopped short of unraveling the accord or even rewriting it, as the deal’s defenders had once feared.

    In a speech that mixed searing criticism of Iran with more measured action, Mr. Trump declared his intention not to certify Iran’s compliance with the agreement. Doing so essentially kicks to Congress a decision about whether to reimpose sanctions on Iran, which would blow up the agreement.

    “We will not continue down a path whose inevitable result is more violence, more chaos and Iran’s nuclear breakout,” Mr. Trump declared at the White House, as he laid out a broader strategy for confronting Iran.

    The president derided the deal as “one of the worst and most one-sided transaction the United States has ever entered into.” But he added, “What’s done is done, and that’s why we are where we are.”

    Mr. Trump said he would ask Congress to establish “trigger points,” which could prompt the United States to reimpose sanctions on Iran if it crosses thresholds set by Congress.

    “In the event we are not able to reach a solution working with Congress and our allies, then the agreement will be terminated,” Mr. Trump said.

    Those could include continued ballistic missile launches by Iran, a refusal to extend the duration of constraints on its nuclear fuel production, or a conclusion by the United States’ intelligence agencies that Iran could produce a nuclear weapon in less than a year.

    Mr. Trump delivered a fire-breathing denunciation of the Iranian government, saying it financed terrorist groups, imprisoned Americans, plotted attacks on troops, and fomented civil wars in Iraq, Yemen and Syria. “Given the regime’s murderous past and present,” he said, “we should not take lightly its sinister vision for the future.”

    Enacting new legislation on the agreement would require 60 votes in the Senate, meaning Republicans would need to pick up some Democratic support.

    Mr. Trump argues his strategy is far tougher on Iran than the Obama administration was. The policy “focuses on neutralizing the government of Iran’s destabilizing influence and constraining its aggression, particularly its support for terrorism and militants,” the White House said in a summary issued Thursday evening.

    The nuclear deal is the latest international agreement that Mr. Trump has tried to exit, amend or water down, including the Paris climate accord and the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The closest analogy to this deal may be Nafta, the trade agreement that Mr. Trump once threatened to rip up and is now undergoing a painstaking renegotiation.

    In this case, however, Iran has said that it will not take part in any renegotiation of an accord it also hammered out with three European countries, as well as with Russia and China. Persuading the Europeans — Britain, France and Germany — to reopen the negotiations could prove almost as difficult.

    Even getting Congress, which is deeply divided on the Iran deal, to agree on additional legislation could prove difficult. While some Republicans are eager to undermine the deal, Democrats are equally determined to preserve what they view as another legacy of the Obama administration that Mr. Trump is trying to dismantle.

    On Thursday evening, Senator Bob Corker, Republican of Tennessee and the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, released a potential blueprint toward imposing an automatic return of sanctions if Iran was believed able of producing a nuclear weapon within a year, or if it violated other restrictions.

    Mr. Corker worked on the proposal with administration officials and Senator Tom Cotton, the Arkansas Republican who is a hard-liner on Iran policy, and predicted it could earn bipartisan support. It suggests that Mr. Corker’s bitter personal feud with Mr. Trump will not obstruct their cooperation on this issue.

    Mr. Trump’s decision came after a fierce debate inside the administration, according to a senior official familiar with the discussions and who agreed to describe them on condition of anonymity.

    In addition to Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis argued that it was in the national security interests of the United States to keep the deal’s constraints on Iran. The two men succeeded, over time, in persuading Mr. Trump not to immediately scrap an accord that he had said during last year’s presidential campaign was a “disaster” and the “worst deal ever.”



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  3. #2

    Trump strikes blow at Iran nuclear deal

    U.S. President Donald Trump struck a blow against the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement on Friday in defiance of other world powers, choosing not to certify that Tehran is complying with the deal and warning he might ultimately terminate it.

    Trump announced the major shift in U.S. policy in a speech in which he detailed a more aggressive approach to Iran over its nuclear and ballistic missile programs and its support for extremist groups in the Middle East.
    He accused Iran of "not living up to the spirit" of the nuclear agreement and said his goal is to ensure Tehran never obtains a nuclear weapon.
    "We will not continue down a path whose predictable conclusion is more violence more terror and the very real threat of Iranís nuclear breakout," Trump said.
    Trump's hardline remarks drew praise from Israel, Iran's arch-foe, but was criticized by European allies.
    The move by Trump was part of his "America First" approach to international agreements which has led him to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord and the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade talks.
    His Iran strategy angered Tehran and put Washington at odds with other signatories of the accord such as Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China and the European Union, some of which have benefited economically on renewed trade with Iran.
    Responding to Trump, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said on Friday on live television that Tehran was committed to the deal and accused Trump of making baseless accusations.
    European allies have warned of a split with the United States over the nuclear agreement and say that putting it in limbo as Trump has done undermines U.S. credibility abroad, especially as international inspectors say Iran is in compliance with the accord.
    U.S. Democrats expressed scepticism at Trump's decision. Senator Ben Cardin said: ďAt a moment when the United States and its allies face a nuclear crisis with North Korea, the President has manufactured a new crisis that will isolate us from our allies and partners.Ē


    While Trump did not pull the United States out of the agreement, aimed at preventing Iran from developing a nuclear bomb, he gave the U.S. Congress 60 days to decide whether to reimpose economic sanctions on Tehran that were lifted under the pact.
    If Congress reimposes the sanctions, the United States would in effect be in violation of the terms of the nuclear deal and it would likely fall apart. If lawmakers do nothing, the deal remains in place.
    Congress is more likely to take up legislation proposed by two Republican Senators that would set new restrictions on Iran, including reimposing U.S. nuclear sanctions if Tehran were deemed to be within one year of developing a nuclear weapon.
    Trump directed U.S. intelligence agencies to probe whether Iran might be working with North Korea on its weapons programs.

    More at: https://www.yahoo.com/news/president...153624871.html
    Last edited by Swordsmyth; 10-13-2017 at 01:39 PM.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  4. #3

  5. #4
    Trump is an idiot. Who cares if Iran builds a nuke? They don't bother us.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Walking away from the agreement could make any deal with Korea even more difficult (such a deal is extremely unlikely anyways).
    Yawn. N Korea has been playing these diplomatic leverage games forever.

    North Korea's claims of "declaration of war" became so ridiculous that the The Onion newspaper satirized them:


    Title: Kim Jong-Il Interprets Sunrise As Act Of War

    October 31, 2006


    PYONGYANG, NORTH KOREA–Increasingly defiant toward international pressure since his nation's first nuclear test in early October, North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il condemned this morning's sunrise, calling it "another hostile, deliberately timed act by the world community" and "a clear and blatant declaration of war."

    According to North Korean military sources, the sunrise, sighted at 6:17 a.m. by patrolling officers, was not fully confirmed until an hour later, at which time Kim assessed the threat himself, and immediately released a harshly worded warning to the U.S. and the United Nations Security Council.


    More hilarity based on fake news here: http://www.theonion.com/article/kim-...ct-of-war-2077

    LOL
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCount View Post
    ...I believe that when the government is capable of doing a thing, it will.
    Quote Originally Posted by Influenza View Post
    which one of yall fuckers wrote the "ron paul" racist news letters
    Quote Originally Posted by Dforkus View Post
    Zippy's posts are a great contribution.




    Disrupt, Deny, Deflate. Read the RPF trolls' playbook here (post #3): http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...eptive-members

  7. #6

    LOL. He posted the thread 3 minutes after you. He was likely posting and never even saw your thread. You pointing out your thread to most others' threads is like someone marketing the New York Times and fake news.
    Last edited by NorthCarolinaLiberty; 10-13-2017 at 01:56 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCount View Post
    ...I believe that when the government is capable of doing a thing, it will.
    Quote Originally Posted by Influenza View Post
    which one of yall fuckers wrote the "ron paul" racist news letters
    Quote Originally Posted by Dforkus View Post
    Zippy's posts are a great contribution.




    Disrupt, Deny, Deflate. Read the RPF trolls' playbook here (post #3): http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...eptive-members

  8. #7
    Trump is warmonger MIC puppet. No different than Clinton/Bush/Obama.
    When a trumpet sounds in a city, do not the people tremble?
    When disaster comes to a city, has not the Lord caused it? Amos 3:6

  9. #8
    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/1...isperer-243772

    Nikki Haley was Trump’s Iran whisperer

    The U.N. Ambassador paved the way for decertification as other cabinet members urged caution.


    At a mid-day meeting in the Oval Office in late July, U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley came to President Donald Trump with an offer.

    Trump had grudgingly declared Tehran in compliance with the 2015 Iran nuclear deal earlier in the month, at the urging of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Defense James Mattis. Trump hated the deal. But the two men pushed him to certify it, arguing in part that he lacked a strong case for declaring Iran in violation. A refusal to do so would have looked rash, they said, convincing Trump sign off for another 90 days.

    Haley, in that July meeting, which also included National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster and Vice President Mike Pence, asked the president to let her make the case for decertification

    “Let me lay a foundation for it,” she said, according a source familiar with the proceedings. The president agreed.

    Haley would become the administration’s most vocal public proponent of decertification—and Trump’s favorite internal voice on Iran—further boosting her standing with the president at a time when she is seen as a potential successor to Tillerson, whose tense relationship with Trump has burst into the open in recent days.
    Haley wasn’t alone. The fingerprints of former U.N. ambassador John Bolton, whose access to Trump was recently limited by chief of staff John Kelly, were also on Trump’s Friday address in the form of a warning that Trump, who opted not to push for steps that could undo the nuclear agreement, could still cancel the deal “at any time.

    The line was added to Trump’s speech after Bolton, despite Kelly’s recent edict, reached the president by phone on Thursday afternoon from Las Vegas, where Bolton was visiting with Republican megadonor Sheldon Adelson. Bolton urged Trump to include a line in his remarks noting that he reserved the right to scrap the agreement entirely, according to two sources familiar with the conversation.

    Trump wound up saying that the agreement “is under continuous review, and our participation can be canceled by me, as President, at any time.” Bolton declined to comment on any conversation with the president.

    Within the administration, Haley worked to chart a middle path by which Trump would decertify the deal while working with Congress in hope of strengthening it by adding new conditions on Iranian behavior to avoid a new round of U.S. sanctions.

    In internal debates, where most members of the president’s cabinet initially opposed decertification, Haley played a similar role: She was “the most engaged and most vocal” cabinet member who favored decertification, according to a senior White House aide.

    At times, that put her at odds with other cabinet members, especially Tillerson, who vocally opposed her trip to Vienna in August – a matter that became another flashpoint in the ongoing feud between the two.
    More at link.



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  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by 69360 View Post
    Trump is an idiot. Who cares if Iran builds a nuke? They don't bother us.
    And if they would what is Tel Aviv to us?

  12. #10
    President Donald Trump's call for Congress to toughen the Iran nuclear deal faced opposition on Friday from among the ranks of his fellow Republicans as well as from Democrats, narrowing the chances any legislation could pass.

    As Trump announced that he had chosen not to certify Tehran is complying with the deal but would not immediately withdraw from it, Republican Senators Bob Corker and Tom Cotton offered an outline of legislation they said would "address flaws" in the accord.
    If passed, the measure would set stricter restrictions on Iran and immediately revive U.S. sanctions imposed over Iran's nuclear program if Tehran is deemed able to produce a nuclear weapon within a year.
    "We have provided a route to overcome deficiencies (in the agreement) and to keep the administration in the deal, and actually make it the kind of deal that it should have been in the first place," Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said on a call with journalists.
    Republicans control Congress, but their four-seat edge in the Senate means any measure would need Democratic support to pass, even if every member of Trump's party supports it.
    That is not a given.
    Republican Senator Marco Rubio said he had "serious doubts" about the Corker-Cotton plan. He said he would reserve judgment until the final measure, but preferred that Trump abandon the deal.
    "Ultimately, leaving the nuclear deal, reimposing suspended sanctions, and having the president impose additional sanctions would serve our national interest better than a decertified deal that leaves sanctions suspended or a new law that leaves major flaws in that agreement in place," Rubio said in a statement.
    Most Democrats were strongly opposed.
    Senator Ben Cardin, ranking Democrat on the Foreign Relations panel, said he would only support a measure backed by European allies who had signed the nuclear pact, formally known as the JCPOA.
    "Anything we do must be consistent with the JCPOA, cannot lead us on a path to violate the JCPOA and must have the support of our European allies," he told Reuters in a telephone interview.

    More at: https://www.yahoo.com/news/key-senat...160921043.html


    Hopefully gridlock will set in.
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment



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