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Thread: Is Stevia the Best Treatment for Lyme Disease? Researchers Say Yes

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Is Stevia the Best Treatment for Lyme Disease? Researchers Say Yes

    Is Stevia the Best Treatment for Lyme Disease? Researchers Say Yes

    Researchers found that the liquid form of whole-leaf stevia extract was effective Stevia is most commonly known as some people’s favorite coffee sweetener, but researchers at the University of New Haven say that it can also be the best treatment for Lyme disease.

    In the study, which was originally published in 2015 in the European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology, researchers found that the sugar substitute was effective in fighting the bacteria that cause the tick-borne disease, Borrelia burgdorferi — even more so than antibiotics including doxycycline, cefoperazone, and daptomycin.

    Dr. Eva Sapi, chairwoman of the Department of Biology and Environmental Science and director of Lyme disease research at the University of New Haven, began studying the disease after being diagnosed and has since been “on a mission” to find out more about a treatment that works, Fox 61 reported.

    The therapy will soon be tested in clinical trials among patients of Dr. Richard Horowitz at Hyde Park, New York, while Sapi’s team at the University of New Haven will continue to test the method on Zebrafish.
    https://www.thedailymeal.com/news/he...say-yes/071417
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  3. #2

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    Every time I see articles about stevia, I feel like I have to remind people that it comes from chrysanthemums. People with severe allergies to chrysanthemums should consult their allergists before using products stevia, or products containing stevia.

    If I had Lyme disease, my allergist and I would be having that conversation, for sure.
    "There are two freedoms - the false, where a man is free to do what he likes; the true, where he is free to do what he ought."~~Charles Kingsley

  4. #3

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    Also, this has been very promising.

    Teasel Root (Dipsacus Sylvestris) And Lyme Disease
    http://www.tiredoflyme.com/teasel-root.html


    Teasel Root And Lyme Disease

    Teasel Root is used for healing from Lyme Disease and for good reason. Borrelia, the Lyme bacteria, is a spirochete bacteria which means its body is spiral shaped and designed to drill into tissue such as joints, organs, and even bone. While buried within the tissue of our bodies, the spirochetes are cleverly concealed and out of reach from antibiotics and the immune system much like in a biofilm or cyst form. Teasel Root is used for its ability to pull the bacteria from tissue, and into the blood stream, exposing it to antibiotics and the immune system.
    "Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
    "Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
    "To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
    "People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by euphemia View Post
    Every time I see articles about stevia, I feel like I have to remind people that it comes from chrysanthemums. People with severe allergies to chrysanthemums should consult their allergists before using products stevia, or products containing stevia.

    If I had Lyme disease, my allergist and I would be having that conversation, for sure.
    Stevia you see in stores is also a highly processed chemical. And since it has a bitter taste, it is usually combined with other sweeteners- those could be other artificial sweeteners or sugar. The study did NOT use the kind you can go to the store and buy.

    http://www.nhregister.com/health/201...sease-bacteria

    Could a common sweetener that’s already in the kitchen cupboards in many American homes — stevia — prove to be an effective treatment for a disease as nasty and persistent as Lyme disease?

    Maybe even as good as or better than antibiotics?

    It’s too early to say that for sure.
    But liquid, whole-leaf stevia extract — not the powdered varieties that people most commonly use — reduced the biofilm mass by about 40 percent, they found.

    Sapi said Horowitz’s trial involves combining stevia with antibiotics.
    Other sugars worked too:

    The research that includes stevia started when Sapi — a former Yale ovarian cancer researcher who has worked for years to find a better treatment for Lyme disease since she had a bout with it, herself — came across research “that if you that if you add sugar to various antibiotics, it could help.

    “So we went to Shop Rite and bought sugar,” including “all the fake sugars,” Sapi said.

    In fact, they bought “every kind of sugar that you can think of.”
    But “we found several agents which worked as well.”
    Works in a dish in a lab does not necessarily mean it works inside the human body. It may require direct contact with the fresh sugars which does not happen when you consume sugars which are broken down before they enter the bloodstream.
    Last edited by Zippyjuan; 07-17-2017 at 12:13 PM.
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  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Stevia you see in stores is also a highly processed chemical. And since it has a bitter taste, it is usually combined with other sweeteners- those could be other artificial sweeteners or sugar. The study did NOT use the kind you can go to the store and buy.
    Wow, wrong as usual.

    You can buy pure stevia extract in stores, in liquid or powdered form. It tastes bitter, so do artificial sweeteners.. except stevia has health benefits and artificial sweeteners are bad for you.

    The powdered kind has some minimal processing, but there is even less processing in the liquid form. I would actually recommend the liquid form because there is less processing and it is easier to measure out and mix into things like tea or coffee. Powdered form may be better for some baked items.

    As far as mixing stevia with sugar or other sweeteners, that is actually a good thing. That means using less sugar or less alcohol sugar or whatever sweetener you are using, and more healthful stevia. There are very few non-caloric sweeteners that taste good on their own, and actually besides sugar even using honey or other alternative sweeteners sometimes is not great going full strength. So stevia helps boost other sweeteners without having to use as much.

    Or you can get a plant, dry out the leaves, crush them and make your own without any further processing.

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/54052-stevia-processed/


    Last edited by dannno; 07-17-2017 at 12:37 PM.
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  7. #6

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    https://www.steviashantanu.com/stevi...n-technology-1

    The industrial process of extraction of steviol glycoside is often the least understood aspect in entire value addition chain of Stevia. All the information available in the public domain about the extraction process is either too technical for general audience or infested with overhyped marketing jargon. Let me try to explain the process in detail in simple and straightforward language.

    The extraction of steviol glycosides from Stevia leaves and its purification involves several steps. The major steps are (1) Primary extraction with water or solvent, (2) Purification of the liquid extract, (3) Separation of solid glycosides from purified liquid extract, (4) Solvent recovery and (5) Further purification of the solid glycosides. Now let me explain the processes one by one -
    Primary Extraction:

    In the extraction process the first step involves extraction of dried leaves with a liquid extractant. The most common extractants are water, primary and secondary alcohols. Sometimes, uncommon solvents like dioxane is also used. Steviol glycosides are soluble in polar solvents and virtually insoluble in non-polar solvents. Often, this property is used for separation of fats and waxes from steviol glycoside extracts. Dried leaves are often pre-treated with organic non-polar solvents like chloroform, ethylene chloride or hexane to remove fats and waxes from the leaves. Then, glycosides are extracted from the defatted leaves.

    The actual engineering set up for the extraction process also differs greatly among extraction facilities. Most of the traditional Chinese units use an open trough fitted with an agitator for extraction. In this system, leaves are dumped in a long open trough; warm water is fed to the trough to submerge the leaves. Then the leaves are agitated in the water. After a certain time, the extract is drained from the trough and the extracted leaves are discharged from the trough by opening trap door at the bottom of the troughs.

    The absorbed extractant from the leaves are squeezed out either by basket centrifuges or screw press. The extracted and spent leaves then go for solid waste disposal. The separated extractant is pooled with that drained from the trough.
    Purification

    The primary extract is then clarified either by flocculation or electro-coagulation. For purification by flocculation, the extract is treated with flocculants like Calcium hydroxide, Aluminum hydroxide, Alum, Calcium carbonate, Ferric chloride etc. This flocculants precipitates the gummy and resinous polysaccharides, proteins and plant pigments.

    In the electrocoagulation method, aluminum electrodes are dipped in the extract and they are connected with low voltage high current power source. The flow of electric current through the extract coagulates the gums, resins and pigments and makes the extract clear.
    After this stage, the extract is freed from the coagulated material by filtration. Generally, common plate and frame filters are used in this stage.

    The next step is separation of solid glycosides from liquid extract. Clarified liquid extract from this stage can be processed by to entirely divergent technologies.

    Stevia Ion Exchange:

    The clarified liquid extract is then passed through a column filled with weekly polar macro-porous synthetic resin granules. The resin absorbs steviol glycosides from the extract and the glycosides are stored within the resin. The spent extract, devoid of steviol glycosides comes out from the resin columns.

    Then the adsorbed steviol glycoside is washed out from the resin column with alcohol – generally ethanol. Pure alcohol is fed to the column and alcohol with steviol glycoside dissolved into it comes out. Along with steviol glycoside, the alcohol is also carries plant pigments, and salts as impurities.

    The alcoholic extract is then treated with activated carbon to remove most of the plant pigments. Then it is filtered to remove suspended activated carbon particles.
    The activated carbon treated alcoholic extract is passed first through columns filled with strong cation exchange resin and then through another column filled with weak anion exchange resins. The resin columns remove salts and plant pigments from the alcoholic extract. After this process, the alcoholic extract becomes a highly purified solution of steviol glycosides.

    Then the purified alcoholic extract is concentrated by separation of solvent by nanofiltration. The alcoholic extract is filtered through a membrane under high pressure. The pores of the filter membrane is so small, it can filter stevioside molecules from the alcohol. Thus, most of the alcohol is removed from the extract in this stage to make the extract highly concentrated. The separated alcohol is sent to a distillation tower to remove water from it and make it suitable to be used again in the process. In this process, most of the alcohol is recovered.

    The concentrated alcoholic extract is then sent to a rising film evaporation tower. Here, more alcohol is removed from the extract by boiling the extract under partial vacuum. The evaporated alcohol is condensed and recycled. After this stage the extract become highly concentrated and becomes a syrupy liquid. To remove the last traces of impurity, the syrupy liquid is again treated with activated carbon and filtered. Then the purified syrupy liquid is sent to a spray drier. In the spray dryer, the syrupy liquid is sprayed as a fine mist against a stream of hot air. The hot air instantly dries the spray droplets and fine dust of glycosides form. This powdery material is separated from the hot air stream in a cyclone separator. This powder is about 90% pure Total Steviol Glycoside (TSG). This solid glycoside product is then sent to further purification through recrystallization.
    Solvent Extraction:

    In this method, the clarified water extract is mixed with a water immiscible organic solvent and agitated vigorously. The solvent has higher affinity towards steviol glycosides than water and it absorbs the glycosides from the water extract.

    After the mixing, the solvent-water extract mixture is allowed to stand for some time. On standing the solvent and water layer separates. The water layer, which is now devoid of any steviol glycosides, is sent to effluent treatment plant. The solvent layer is then treated with activated carbon to decolorize it and filtered to separate suspended activated carbon particles.

    Then the decolorized solvent is concentrated by evaporation under vacuum and solvent is recovered for recycling. Steviol glycosides start crystallizing out from the solvent after it gets concentrated to a certain level.
    The crystals are separated from the mother liquor by a basket centrifuge. The mother liquor is sent back to the process and the crystallized glycosides are sent for further purification through recrystallization. We have made several improvement of this process to make it more efficient. For solvent extraction we have successfully developed a continuous process based on Kuhni type extractor. For quick and efficient seperation of solvent phase, special disc stack centrifuge is also successfully employed.
    Purification:

    The next and final step of steviol glycoside purification process is the seperation and purification of Reb A.

    The solid glycoside mix (TSG) is dissolved in a specific hot water alcohol mixture under refluxing condition and then cooled to crystallize Reb A crystalls. The dissolution and crustallization is done in the same jacketted vessel provided with a motorized stirrer. During the dissolution process the mixture is heated by passing steam through the jacket of the vessel. Then, for crystallization, the solution is cooled by passing cold water through the jacket.

    The crystallized Reb A can be seperated from the mother liquor by basket centrifuge and dried in vacuum tray dryers.
    The mother liquor is then sent for concentration by nano filtration followed by vacuum evaporation, decolorization by active carbon treatment. Lower grades of TSG is prepared by spray drying of this concentrated mother liquor.
    From Danno's link:

    Most commercial processes consist of water extraction, decoloration, and purification using ion-exchange resins, electrolytic techniques, or precipitating agents," according to SteviaPowder.com.

    Some powdered forms of stevia extract can contain maltodextrin, a food additive derived from cornstarch that may contain MSG. Although processing is involved, and a white powder is produced, many of the health properties of the stevia plant survive, making it a healthy alternative to sugar or sugar substitutes like Aspartame and Nutrasweet.
    Maltodextrin is usually produced from GMO corn too.
    Last edited by Zippyjuan; 07-18-2017 at 06:13 PM.
    "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." - William Gibson

    I am Zippy and I approve of this post. But you don't have to.

  8. #7

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    Just addressing the chrysanthemum thing. Recently my chiro gave me a supplement. A couple of days later I had some symptoms. Looked at the label (which is what I should have done to begin with). Saw stevia. Put myself in allergy jail.
    "There are two freedoms - the false, where a man is free to do what he likes; the true, where he is free to do what he ought."~~Charles Kingsley






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