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Thread: 'The Drug Whisperer'

  1. #1

    Default 'The Drug Whisperer'

    Their training can detect drugs better than a blood or urine test...you can't make this $#@! up.

    Drunk driving arrests are down sharply after decades of aggressive enforcement, while drugged driving arrests are climbing.

    Georgia now has more than 250 officers with special 'drug recognition expert' training.

    But 11Alive News Chief Investigator Brendan Keefe discovered some drivers are getting arrested for driving stoned -- even when their drug tests came back clean.
    draft

    Katelyn Ebner was arrested after she left her job as a server at a bar in Cobb County.

    Cobb County Police Officer T.T. Carroll: "You said you haven't had anything to drink tonight?"
    Katelyn Ebner: "Not tonight, no."
    Officer Carroll: "Not tonight, okay. One of the things we do is we ask people to blow through this thing, okay."

    Katelyn Ebner crossed the center line, and got pulled over on the way home from work. She works in a bar, and does not drink while at work.

    Officer Carroll: "Blow real hard, blow 'til I ask you to stop -- keep going, keep going -- you can stop. Okay."

    No, she had not been drinking. All tests for alcohol came up empty. But the Cobb County police officer who pulled her over was not done yet.

    Officer Carroll: "I'm going to ask you a question, okay? When was the last time you smoked marijuana?"
    Katelyn Ebner: "Oh, I don't do that. I can give you a drug test right now."
    Officer Carroll: "You don't smoke marijuana?"
    Katelyn Ebner: "I do not, no."
    Officer Carroll: "Okay. Well, you're showing me indicators that you have been smoking marijuana, okay?"

    "I didn't realize that you could get arrested for something that you didn't do," Ebner told Keefe. "That never crossed my mind until it happened to me."

    Officer Carroll: "Watch your wrists for me, I don't want to pinch you."
    Katelyn Ebner: "I'm going to jail for marijuana?"
    Officer Carroll: "No, ma'am -- not possession, unless I find any in your car. I believe you're impaired by the marijuana you've smoked."
    Katelyn Ebner: "Okay, so when I do a drug test, I'll be free to go, correct?"
    Officer Carroll: "You're going to jail, ma'am. Okay? I don't have a magical drug test that I can give you right now."

    "Before you felt the handcuffs closing over your wrist, did you understand just how serious this was?" Keefe asked Ebner.

    "I didn't understand," Ebner said. "As soon as I took that breathalyzer, I thought I was going home."

    The waitress spent the night in jail, had her alcohol server's permit revoked because of the arrest. After four months, prosecutors dismissed all her charges -- because the blood test came back completely clean.
    draft

    Nursing student Princess Mbamara was arrested by Cobb County Police Officer T.T. Carroll because he believed she was under the influence of marijuana

    "You had to spend months -- and thousands of dollars -- proving your innocence," Keefe said.

    "I did," Ebner said.

    Officer Carroll: "When's the last time you smoked weed?"
    Princess Mbamara: "I don't smoke weed."
    Officer Carroll: "You don't smoke weed?"
    Princess Mbamara: "No. Not at all."
    Officer Carroll: "Okay."

    The same thing happened to college student Princess Mbamara two weeks earlier -- on Good Friday.

    Princess Mbamara: "Wait -- okay, hold on sir."
    Officer Carroll: "Just one second -- Just give me one second."
    Princess Mbamara: "You're arresting me!?"
    Officer Carroll: "That's correct."
    Princess Mbamara: "Sir, hold on one second. I'm complying."

    "I didn't understand," Mbamara told Keefe. "I was like, 'Why are you arresting me? What did I do? I did everything. I walked the straight line, I touched my nose, I did everything you asked.' I was like, 'Why am I getting arrested?' And he said, 'DUI of a substance.' And I was like, 'What!?'"

    Princess Mbamara: "You're arresting me because you think I smoke marijuana?"
    Officer Carroll: "I think you're impaired by cannabis, yes, ma'am."
    Princess Mbamara: "Sir, I don't smoke weed! Is there a way you can test me right now?"

    Princess Mbamara was also jailed. She fought the DUI-drug charges for half of 2016.

    "So the blood test comes back, and they toss the case?" Keefe asked.
    draft

    Princess Mbamara's toxicology screening only showed positive for lidocaine - an over-the-counter medication used in products like these back pain medication patches, available for less than $10 at Walmart.

    "I remember my lawyer trying to talk about a deal," she said. "I was like, 'I'm not taking a deal. I didn't do anything! I want more than just a deal -- I want more than just dismissal; I want my life back. Can you reverse time? If you can go back in time, then that's what I really want.'"

    Mbamara's toxicology screen came back and only showed positive for lidocaine -- an over-the-counter local anesthetic used in transdermal patches to treat back pain, insect bites and other types of pain and discomfort. Lidocaine can be found in many other anti-burn, anti-itch and pain creams, lotions and medications sold both over-the-counter and by prescription under a myriad of brand names, including Aspercreme, Icy Hot, Salonpas, Preparation H, Gold Bond, Solarcaine and others.

    An Auburn University student was also arrested by Officer Carroll using the same drug recognition screening protocol. After his blood and urine tests came back negative, charges were dropped by the prosecutor five months later.

    Officer Carroll: "How're you doing?"
    Auburn Student: "I'm doing great."
    Officer Carroll: "Okay -- Let's just walk over here for a second."
    Auburn Student: "All right."

    Months later, it happened again to an Auburn University student.

    Officer Carroll: "You're giving me indicators that you have consumed marijuana, okay? So at this time, I believe that your failure to maintain lane was the reason for that -- so you're being placed under arrest for DUI, okay?"

    The prosecutor filed a dismissal of the DUI-drug charge five months later: "Defendant performed well on FSEs (Field Sobriety Evaluations) and blood and urine were negative."

    Three DUI drug arrests -- Three clean toxicology screenings -- One police officer: Cobb County Police Officer T.T. Carroll.

    Documents show Carroll is one of the best-trained officers on Cobb County's legendary DUI Task Force.

    He's a certified drug recognition expert -- one of 250 Georgia officers who have gone through a month-long training course.

    The DRE Evaluation involves a dozen observations that allow officers not only to pronounce a driver is on drugs, but to identify which of seven types of drugs are in their system.



    Princess Mbamara: "How can you look at somebody and say marijuana?"
    Officer Carroll: "Because of the totality of the circumstances and a lot of things -- and there are involuntary responses of the body that we can observe that have suggested impairment of marijuana, okay?"

    "He looked at you. He did this technique that he was taught, and he determined you were on something you weren't on," Keefe said.

    "Yeah, unfortunately for me," Mbamara said.

    Officer Carroll: "Because he's ingested marijuana -- that's what my training suggests, okay?"

    Officer Carroll relies on his drug recognition expert training -- but in these three dismissed cases, he did not do the full evaluation after the arrests. The standard protocol requires all 12 steps to be completed -- yet, any police officer can make a DUI-drug arrest on fewer observations.

    ...

    "But he just did the 'magical drug test' that resulted in your arrest," Keefe said.
    "Yes," Ebener said. "They're ruining people's lives."

    Katelyn Ebner filed an Internal Affairs complaint against Officer Carroll.

    Cobb County Investigators exonerated the officer and doubted Ebner's innocence, insisting, 'the marijuana could have already metabolized out of the blood.'

    "When you brought up that you had a clean blood test when complaining to Internal Affairs, their answer was what?" Keefe asked.

    "They said, 'Yeah, we see this happen all the time. Um, the test results come back wrong all the time,'" she said.

    "So the test results were wrong?" Keefe asked.

    "Yeah, that's what they said," Ebner replied. "The test results were wrong, and also, if I had a urine test, it would have come back positive for drugs."

    But Katelyn got her own urine test the same week as her arrest -- scanning for any metabolites that would still be in her system. The urine test was also negative for marijuana -- or other drugs.

    "This training is so powerful, that they believe they can detect drugs that a blood test will not detect," Keefe said. "Is that surprising to you?"

    "That's extremely surprising," Princess Mbamara replied. "That's extremely surprising -- because this is my life that they're playing with."

    Last week, Cobb County's DUI Task Force was awarded a trophy by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, and Officer Carroll was given a Silver Medal for 90 DUI arrests during 2016.



    In late April, Cobb County's DUI Task Force was awarded a trophy by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, and Officer T.T. Carroll was given a Silver Medal for 90 DUI arrests during 2016.

    "He's getting an award for just arrests," Mbamara said. "Not even convictions. Arrests."Mbamara said. "Not even convictions. Arrests."

    "And you were one of them," Keefe said.

    "And I'm one of these arrests," Mbamara said. "So this guy is just stacking up on awards and trophies. On ruining people's lives."

    "He's getting praised for arresting innocent people," Katelyn Ebner said. "I'm not saying all those people he arrested were innocent, but at least three of them were, and no one is doing anything about it."

    "It's something that I'm going to have to carry for the rest of my life," Mbamara said.

    Officer Carroll got a promotion and a merit raise after a 2016 employment evaluation -- which also noted most of his DUI arrests end in convictions or pleas. Supervisors call him the department's 'go-to officer when it comes to DUI-drugs." He got top marks for making the correct arrest-no arrest decision on impaired drivers.


    There's no mention of the three drivers who had their DUI charges thrown out because of negative lab tests.

    What is the Cobb County Police Department saying about all of this?

    Commanders would not let Officer Carroll talk with us, but they stand behind the arrests. The department doubled-down on their assertion that the drug recognition expert is better at detecting marijuana in a driver than scientific tests.

    ...
    http://www.11alive.com/news/investig.../437061710?c=n
    Last edited by Suzanimal; 05-05-2017 at 07:27 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Paul View Post
    The intellectual battle for liberty can appear to be a lonely one at times. However, the numbers are not as important as the principles that we hold. Leonard Read always taught that "it's not a numbers game, but an ideological game." That's why it's important to continue to provide a principled philosophy as to what the role of government ought to be, despite the numbers that stare us in the face.



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  3. #2

  4. #3

    Default


    Please tell me why I should worship the state (who apparently is the only party that can possess guns without question).

    The state's only purpose is to kill and control. Why do you worship it? - Sola_Fide


    ^THAT^

    Baptiste said.
    At which point will Americans realize that creating an unaccountable institution that is able to pass its liability on to tax-payers is immoral and attracts sociopaths?

  5. #4

    Default

    I'd suspect the cop was under the influence of a mind altering drug if they pulled that on me and do a citizen's arrest on them.

    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!


    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  6. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danke View Post
    I'd suspect the cop was under the influence of a mind altering drug if they pulled that on me and do a citizen's arrest on them.
    yer such a badass.

  7. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Origanalist View Post
    yer such a badass.
    I know. I get that all the time.


    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!


    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  8. #7

    Default

    The Drug Whisperer: ACLU files suit against Cobb County PD

    The ACLU announced Monday morning that they are filing a federal lawsuit against the Cobb County Police Department as a direct result of our Drug Whisperer investigation from earlier this year.

    In our original investigative report, we profiled three people who were falsely arrested based on traffic stops tied to the drug recognition training of Officer Tracy Carroll.


    In the three cases profiled, Carroll pulled each individual over and arrested them, based on his "hunch" that each of them was under the influence of marijuana. Each of the three motorists was arrested and charged with DUI-Drugs.


    The three people involved -- Katelyn Ebner, Princess Mbamara, and Ayokunle Oriyomi -- were forced to have their blood drawn and held in a jail cell for hours, based on Carroll's "hunch." In each case, the drug tests indicated a negative presence of marijuana. All three of them spent months defending themselves legally. Eventually, all charges for each of the drivers were dropped.

    Officer Carroll is a drug recognition expert, certified by the International Association of Chiefs of Police. In order to receive that certification, Carroll had to attend a 160-hour training course of study.

    The official Drug Recognition Expert Evaluation involves a dozen specific observations that allow officers not only to indicate that a driver is on drugs, but to specifically identify which of seven types of drugs are in a driver's system. However, the standard protocol requires all 12 steps to be completed before an officer can make that pronouncement.

    Officer Carroll did not complete the full 12 steps in any of the three cases profiled in our original Drug Whisperer investigation.


    Cobb County Police Chief Michael Register is not named in the ACLU lawsuit, but he his overseeing changes to his department's policies as a direct result of our investigation. All three drivers were jailed overnight, and are suing the department individually for wrongful arrest.

    Now, Cobb County is releasing drivers suspected of marijuana impairment and delaying formal charges until blood test results are returned.

    "We certainly want to protect the citizens on the roadways of Cobb County by getting a suspected impaired driver off the roadway, but we don't want to make an unnecessary arrest on a citizen," Chief Register said.


    Despite this, the Cobb County Police Department maintains its assertion that their drug recognition experts' training is actually better at detecting marijuana in a driver than scientific crime lab tests.

    "They're kind of treating him like the human drug-sniffing dog; he's the 'drug whisperer,' 11Alive's Brendan Keefe said, speaking to one of the wrongly accused drivers, Katelyn Ebner about Officer Carroll. "He can see impairment in people that other officers can't see."

    "I think that they think that because he has so many arrests," Carroll said. "One day, I'm going to go and get a real job and people are going to be able to Google my name and see I was arrested for drugs that I didn't do."

    The ACLU's suit is seeking compensatory damages from Officer Carroll, the Cobb County Police Department and from Cobb County, along with any additional relief the Court may deem appropriate under the circumstances.
    http://www.11alive.com/article/news/...source=twitter


    A Georgia father nearly loses custody of his two young kids because of a DUI arrest – but he didn’t have a drop to drink.

    Now, the single over-the-counter allergy pill that left a father fighting to save his family.

    “I’m gonna pull him out and check his sobriety,” a police officer says, talking about a man he has pulled over.


    The officer has a man pulled over on the side of a dark road for speeding -- the man was driving a minivan at 50 mph in a 35 mph zone.

    The 11Alive Investigators later discovered through a combination of checking police department records and independent geographic measurement that the initial reason for the traffic stop itself was accurate. The minivan was, indeed, being driven 15 mph over the posted speed limit for that stretch of road.

    “Are you on any medication, or taking any medication for anything?” the officer asks the man.

    “No sir,” the driver.

    “None at all?” the officer asked.

    “No,” the driver replied.

    “Have you had anything to drink tonight?” the officer asked him.

    “Nothing at all,” he answered.

    “Okay.”

    A college professor – arrested for DUI in front of his son and daughter.

    “At this time, do me a favor,” the officer said. “Put your hands behind your back.”

    “How old are your children?” the officer asked.

    “Twelve and ten,” the man replied.

    “I’m Lt. Chapman with the Garden City P.D.,” the officer told the children sitting inside the car. “Is this your dad?”

    Back on the dashcam, the officer can be seen putting handcuffs on the driver.

    “I’m placing you under arrest for suspicion of DUI-Less-safe, drugs – Okay?” the officer said.

    “Well, he’s being placed under arrest right now,” the officer could be heard telling the kids. “And I’ll explain everything to your mom.”

    Later, the college professor spoke with 11Alive’s Brendan Keefe.

    ...

    Garden City Police charged the father with DUI-Drugs, and with two counts of child endangerment – because his kids were in the back seat.

    Two convictions for child endangerment would have been – you don’t see your kids. They either go to your ex-wife or foster care?

    “Right,” the professor said. “In the back of my mind the whole time is, I know that I’m innocent, and I didn’t endanger my children in any way.”

    “Your husband has been placed under arrest for suspicion of DUI-Drugs,” the officer can be heard telling the professor’s ex-wife on the phone.

    “What!?” she’s heard saying incredulously.

    “Even my ex said, ‘I know that he wasn’t doing anything to endanger the kids, and know that he doesn’t do drugs or anything like that,’” he said.

    “You’re the wife,” the officer said. “Ex-wife?”

    “Ex-wife, yes,” she said as she got out of her car.

    “He’s going to be under arrest for DUI, okay?” the officer said.

    “But—but he doesn’t drink,” she said, still clearly aghast by the officer’s assertion.

    “For medication,” the officer said.

    The blood test came back positive for one drug: Tylenol PM. Specifically, diphenhydramine – the active ingredient in the allergy medicine Benadryl. Either of these over-the-counter medications can impair a driver worse than alcohol – but only four to six hours after taking one.

    “I had taken a Tylenol PM,” the professor said. “Nineteen hours before the arrest was made!”

    Indeed – the GBI Crime Lab detected the Benadryl in such a small amount, it was consistent with a single dose taken a full day before the traffic stop.

    “They wanted me to go to a lesser plea and go to DUI school,” the professor said.

    “Because of a Benadryl you took almost 24 hours earlier?” Keefe asked.

    “Yeah,” the professor said. “Correct – or the day before.”

    “This was the next day,” Keefe said. “The next night – not even the next day, the next night.”

    Keefe spoke later with Garden City’s police chief, David Lyons.

    “Is this driver innocent of DUI?”

    “Well, he is now,” Lyons said. “The court dismissed the charges against him.”

    Lyons once led Georgia’s Association of Chiefs of Police. He says the officer’s opinion is the only tool approved for detecting drugs pre-arrest.

    “If it’s alcohol, you can do an intoxilyzer immediately,” Keefe said.

    “On the spot,” Lyons agreed. “On the spot. For DUI-Drugs, no such thing. Some tool that I have, beyond an educated guess that you’re impaired or not.”

    “It’s like a guessing game,” the professor said. “’Well, maybe the drug test will turn out something.’”

    The officer did not have a crystal ball. He had no way of telling what the drug test would reveal weeks or months into the future. The GBI Crime Lab takes an average of seven weeks to test for drugs alone -- and nearly three months if testing for alcohol as well. In the meantime, the future for the accused is unclear, and their world is turned upside down.

    ...

    State records show the arresting officer completed advanced roadside impairment training – including drug detection – just 15 days before stopping the professor.

    “If you give someone a hammer, everything starts looking like a nail?” Keefe asked rhetorically.

    “Absolutely,” the professor replied.

    Keefe asked Chief Lyons, “Is there a human element once you get advanced training that causes you to see things that are either there or not there?”

    “I don’t – I don’t have an answer for that,” Lyons said. “I would – that argument can probably be made that, ‘I have this new training, and I’m going to go out and show the world that I know how to do all this stuff and I’m going to take advantage of my new latest toy.’ Maybe.”

    ...


    Garden City Police said they stand by their arrest of the professor.

    They even point to a nearly undetectable amount of Ambien in the blood test – so small it couldn’t be measured by the GBI’s crime lab.

    “I don’t have to be perfect,” Lyons said. “I have to be reasonable, and I have to have probable cause.”

    “When they lose in court, nothing happens to them,” Keefe said.

    “They have nothing to lose, and the citizen has everything to lose,” the professor said. “Their name, their reputation – their lifestyle.”

    In the end, the professor did not lose the case, his job or his kids. But he did lose his trust in the system.

    “It really makes you question the whole system of law enforcement. These people are supposed to be protecting – saving lives, and they’re messing up lives,” the professor said. “They’re ruining lives.”

    “I’m not in the business of ruining somebody’s life,” Lyons said. “We are put in the position of getting impaired drivers off the road. At the end of the day, we did our job.”

    “How many innocent people are you comfortable with being accused of arresting for something they did not do, in order to catch those impaired drivers and get them off the road?” Keefe asked Chief Lyons.

    “I don’t know that I’m comfortable with any, if I have any control over it,” Lyons said.

    “If they arrest ten people, and eight of them are positive, who cares about the two innocent people?” Keefe asked the professor.

    “That’s right – except the two innocent people,” the professor said.

    “Do you think this driver is owed an apology, or not?” Keefe asked Chief Lyons.

    “I don’t think he’s owed an apology,” Lyons said. “I would be more than willing to give him one."


    ...

    http://www.11alive.com/article/news/...n/85-477273774
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Paul View Post
    The intellectual battle for liberty can appear to be a lonely one at times. However, the numbers are not as important as the principles that we hold. Leonard Read always taught that "it's not a numbers game, but an ideological game." That's why it's important to continue to provide a principled philosophy as to what the role of government ought to be, despite the numbers that stare us in the face.

  9. #8

    Default

    "Let it not be said that we did nothing." - Dr. Ron Paul.
    "Stand up for what you believe in, even if you are standing alone." - Sophie Magdalena Scholl
    "War is the health of the State." - Randolph Bourne
    "Freedom is the answer. ... Now, what's the question?" - Ernie Hancock.






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