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Thread: Congress Must Reclaim Its War-Making Powers

  1. #1

    Default Congress Must Reclaim Its War-Making Powers

    Congress Must Reclaim Its War-Making Powers
    War without congressional debate seems to be a recipe for war without rhyme, reason or any concept of victory.
    By Rand Paul - December 20, 2016

    THE GREATEST security challenge facing the next president is the national debt. The United States owes nearly $20 trillion, not counting the nearly $50 trillion entitlement debt. The time approaches when America will no longer be able to manage its debt and fund national defense.

    The debt continues to explode because Congress ignores the limitations of the Constitution. The federal government was intended to be limited to specific, enumerated powers, and yet, todayís federal government reaches its meddling hand far afield from the Foundersí intent. To minimize new debt and manage existing debt, officials will have to resurrect the separation-of-powers doctrine. Only by separating power from the president will spending be contained. Power that is not constitutionally given to the president should be taken back by Congress, the states and, ultimately, the people.

    The greatest and most ominous of governmentís power is the ability to go to war. The Founders extensively debated and then concluded that on issues of war, Congress would be required to give its authority. Neoconservatives and their disciples, elected and academic, feel the constitutional requirement for Congress to declare war is no longer applicable. Under President Obamaís tenure, the United States has gone to war in Libya, Syria and Iraq, and engaged in military activities in Yemen without congressional authority. In each instance, the case can be made that unilateral presidential intervention led to less stability, and less security for the United States.

    Military interventions are expensive. The money the United States spends on interventions could otherwise be used for weapons of deterrence or upkeep of its decaying nuclear arsenal.

    Restoring the constitutional mandate that war needs to be authorized by Congress would go a long way to ensuring that a full-throated debate occurs before troops are placed in harmís way.

    The Trump administration can take the lead here, but nothing prevents Congress from engaging in what is maybe its most important constitutional role: war authorization. Congress should be resolute and either pass an appropriate authorization or disapproval for current U.S. interventions while simultaneously repealing the 2001 and 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force.

    The ease with which Congress allows the president to engage in several ďhotspotsĒ around the world tends to make these regions less safe. Members donít want to appear soft on terrorism or unsupportive of the military. It is easier for them to politicize the ineptitude of an administrationís strategy than to exert proper oversight.

    Time after time, the United States has intervened around the world without congressional approval. In Libya, the overthrow of Muammar el-Qaddafi resulted in chaos, leaving an inept Libyan government and large swathes of territory under ISIS control.

    Yemen is another engagement in which Congress has had little to no input. The military and advisory support given to Saudi Arabia fosters future jihadists that want to destroy America. The United States is providing air refueling support; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and U.S. military hardware to Riyadh. In the summer of 2016, a fifteen-year-old boy was killed by a U.S. cluster bomb. In October, Saudi forces repeatedly bombed a funeral in Yemen, in which 140 people were killed and as many as five hundred injured.

    The Yemeni crisis has been going on for almost two years with no signs of abatement. Houthi rebels have already tried to attack the United States by launching two separate missile attacks on the USS Mason. Letís not forget the USS Cole bombing, which also occurred in Yemen. Another unfortunate attack on a U.S. vessel or other American personnel will predictably incite calls for more intervention. Lawmakers must see the writing on the wall. When a president sends U.S. troops on an operation not supported by Congress, often America becomes stuck in a stalemate. War without congressional debate seems to be a recipe for war without rhyme, reason or any concept of victory.

    In September, a few members and I attempted to insert congressional prerogative in matters of national security. Congress took a vote on stopping the sale of 153 Abrams tanks to Saudi Arabia. Over seventy senators voted to allow the sale. Ironically, these same senators voted overwhelmingly, the same day, to allow 9/11 victims to sue the Saudi government for its possible role in the 2001 bombings. Although we lost the vote in the Senate, President Obama eventually decided to suspend the sale of U.S. air-dropped munitions. In this instance, loud voices in Congress did change a foreign-policy outcome.

    The implications of not adhering to constitutionally established roles have huge consequences for U.S. foreign policy. Strategic, operational and tactical considerations by a president and military leaders are of immense consequence. All of these powers are derived from the Constitution. If the Constitution isnít adhered to as the Founding Fathers intended, the nation and American credibility abroad suffer.
    ...
    More: http://nationalinterest.org/feature/...g-powers-18804
    Twitter: B4Liberty@USAB4L
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Corporate-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul


    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.



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  3. #2

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    Dear Citizens,

    We are trying to avoid antagonizing people while trying to get reelected. The war is such a controversial subject. We prefer the president deals with this directly. If there is any fallout because of this, he would be the one taking the blame. Btw, aren't you doing the same in your life?

    Kisses and a sincere $#@! you,

    Your Congress.
    The essential English leadership secret does not depend on particular intelligence. Rather, it depends on a remarkably stupid thick-headedness. The English follow the principle that when one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it. They keep up their lies, even at the risk of looking ridiculous.

  4. #3

    Default

    they should but they won't

  5. #4

    Default Will Trump Help With That, Too?

    I want to hear Donald Trump make that promise that he will defer to Congress when it comes to making decisions on war. I can't find Trump's position on that in his platforms on foreign policy nor on national defense.
    "Diverse weights are an abomination unto the LORD, and a false balance is not good." - Proverbs 20:23

    "Federal Reserve-generated increases in money supply cause economic inequality... By the time the increased money supply trickles down to middle- and working-class Americans, the economy is already beset by inflation. So most average Americans see their standard of living decline as a result of Fed-engendered money supply increases." - Dr. Ron Paul

  6. #5

    Default

    The greatest and most ominous of government’s power is the ability to go to war. The Founders extensively debated and then concluded that on issues of war, Congress would be required to give its authority. Neoconservatives and their disciples, elected and academic, feel the constitutional requirement for Congress to declare war is no longer applicable.
    The Founders also created a War Department. Words mean things. I will be waiting patiently for Sen. Paul to put in a bill repealing the National Security Act of 1947 as well as an amendment to the Patriot Act properly renaming Homeland Security as Internal Surveillence.
    (crickets...)

    XNN
    "They sell us the president the same way they sell us our clothes and our cars. They sell us every thing from youth to religion the same time they sell us our wars. I want to know who the men in the shadows are. I want to hear somebody asking them why. They can be counted on to tell us who our enemies are but theyre never the ones to fight or to die." - Jackson Browne Lives In The Balance

  7. #6

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    If we are not at war, do we need a standing army?

  8. #7

    Default

    Obama is going to take action against Russia. This could be considered an act of war. Where is Congress?
    Twitter: B4Liberty@USAB4L
    "Foreign aid is taking money from the poor people of a rich country, and giving it to the rich people of a poor country." - Ron Paul
    "Beware the Military-Industrial-Financial-Corporate-Media-Government Complex." - B4L update of General Dwight D. Eisenhower
    "Debt is the drug, Wall St. Banksters are the dealers, and politicians are the addicts." - B4L
    "Totally free immigration? I've never taken that position. I believe in national sovereignty." - Ron Paul


    The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own, and do not represent this forum or any other entities or persons.

  9. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian4Liberty View Post
    Obama is going to take action against Russia. This could be considered an act of war. Where is Congress?
    The essential English leadership secret does not depend on particular intelligence. Rather, it depends on a remarkably stupid thick-headedness. The English follow the principle that when one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it. They keep up their lies, even at the risk of looking ridiculous.






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