Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 100

Thread: Dog behavioral issues....

  1. #1

    Dog behavioral issues....

    So we recently added a new addition. Lilly was a pit-bull rescue, which turned out to be mostly Jack Russle (bleeck!), but she has been a fun companion for our pit-bull Newman. There has only been one case of aggression on his point when she once bit him too hard while playing. He brought a little blood but it was just a nip to correct her. So, I understood his position while still correcting him.

    Yesterday he became aggressive towards her. He attacked her once on the porch drawing blood from a bite to her ear. I promptly jumped on him and forced him to show his belly. After he settled into the submissive position and chilled I let him back up. Not more than 10 mins later he went for her again. This time drawing blood from her leg and lip. I pulled him off and I put her inside. He has a pen and it seems like he believes that he owns it, as he went down there after the fight. I decided it was time to correct him on this issue. I pulled him out of the pen and he had the temerity to raise hackles and growl at me. I roughly threw him on his back and held him until his fugue subsided. Within 30 mins. he was back to normal and the two were playing with each other.

    Now, I am trying to figure out what is going on with him. Interesting enough the day before I came out back to see them chewing on a rabbit carcass. The bottom half anyway. It was a fresh kill. Not sure if they found it or killed it themselves. They never have brought one home before. Lilly, being a dog, kept rolling in the carcass until I took it away from them both. So, I'm of the belief that the attacks yesterday might have come because Newman was smelling the rabbit scent on Lilly. I dunno. I gave them both baths today. We will see.

    Any ideas?



  2. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    So we recently added a new addition. Lilly was a pit-bull rescue, which turned out to be mostly Jack Russle (bleeck!), but she has been a fun companion for our pit-bull Newman. There has only been one case of aggression on his point when she once bit him too hard while playing. He brought a little blood but it was just a nip to correct her. So, I understood his position while still correcting him.

    Yesterday he became aggressive towards her. He attacked her once on the porch drawing blood from a bite to her ear. I promptly jumped on him and forced him to show his belly. After he settled into the submissive position and chilled I let him back up. Not more than 10 mins later he went for her again. This time drawing blood from her leg and lip. I pulled him off and I put her inside. He has a pen and it seems like he believes that he owns it, as he went down there after the fight. I decided it was time to correct him on this issue. I pulled him out of the pen and he had the temerity to raise hackles and growl at me. I roughly threw him on his back and held him until his fugue subsided. Within 30 mins. he was back to normal and the two were playing with each other.

    Now, I am trying to figure out what is going on with him. Interesting enough the day before I came out back to see them chewing on a rabbit carcass. The bottom half anyway. It was a fresh kill. Not sure if they found it or killed it themselves. They never have brought one home before. Lilly, being a dog, kept rolling in the carcass until I took it away from them both. So, I'm of the belief that the attacks yesterday might have come because Newman was smelling the rabbit scent on Lilly. I dunno. I gave them both baths today. We will see.

    Any ideas?
    In my experience with pittbull type dogs, they don't really feel pain and being forceful with them may even encourage them in a way. The best way to deal with them in my experience is to use your voice and don't act. Be the leader, pitbulls are very good followers. Forcefully making them show their belly is a way to learn them something but I'm not sure if it's the right one. You have to find a 'non-aggressive' way to to snap him out of his focus. It's hard to explain but you have to be the alpha male, if you force a dog on it's back, it may show you are physically stronger and the dog will respect you for that but the dog won't respect you for being the actual authority. You have to show the dog that you decide if they get excited or not. Do you have a bench ? You could simply point at the bench and tell your dog to get in it whenever his behavior gets out of whack, then if he doesn't want to, maybe stop him moving backwards so the only place he can go is into the bench. This will take a while but if you feel like you are deciding what is going on, you've succeeded.

    You can be forceful and it might work but being decisive and clear works wonders. Don't yell 10 commands after each other. Just once, if no reaction, pause, repeat. If you show you are frustrated, dog wins, you lose. Think about that and you'll be fine.

    Generally speaking if you're not nervous or overexcited, dogs will figure it out when they are playfighting. But I can't see how they are 'playing' so I'd say trust your own instincts more than my reply but I hope there's something in it for you.
    "I am a bird"

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by luctor-et-emergo View Post
    In my experience with pittbull type dogs, they don't really feel pain and being forceful with them may even encourage them in a way. The best way to deal with them in my experience is to use your voice and don't act. Be the leader, pitbulls are very good followers. Forcefully making them show their belly is a way to learn them something but I'm not sure if it's the right one. You have to find a 'non-aggressive' way to to snap him out of his focus. It's hard to explain but you have to be the alpha male, if you force a dog on it's back, it may show you are physically stronger and the dog will respect you for that but the dog won't respect you for being the actual authority. You have to show the dog that you decide if they get excited or not. Do you have a bench ? You could simply point at the bench and tell your dog to get in it whenever his behavior gets out of whack, then if he doesn't want to, maybe stop him moving backwards so the only place he can go is into the bench. This will take a while but if you feel like you are deciding what is going on, you've succeeded.

    You can be forceful and it might work but being decisive and clear works wonders. Don't yell 10 commands after each other. Just once, if no reaction, pause, repeat. If you show you are frustrated, dog wins, you lose. Think about that and you'll be fine.

    Generally speaking if you're not nervous or overexcited, dogs will figure it out when they are playfighting. But I can't see how they are 'playing' so I'd say trust your own instincts more than my reply but I hope there's something in it for you.
    I don't often force him to show his belly or use force against him. This was exceptional in that he would not obey a voice command to "pen-up" while attacking. I have used his pen in much the same way you say to use a bench. However, he has become possessive of that. It seems to have become a reward instead of a correction. That is why I pulled him from the pen and shut the door for a time. Play fighting is one thing. This was outright aggression, which I will not have. Not in an 80# pit-bull. And he is usually NOT like this. That is why I was wondering if his response was do to the scent of the rabbit and her diminutive stature compared to him. She only weighs 32#. Also, it is a bit of a mystery that I got out their "tug-tug" rope a short time after and they played nicely with each other.
    I should probably note that she was recently spayed 5 days ago. I don't know if this would have anything to do with it.
    Last edited by phill4paul; 05-29-2016 at 01:21 PM.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    So we recently added a new addition. Lilly was a pit-bull rescue, which turned out to be mostly Jack Russle (bleeck!), but she has been a fun companion for our pit-bull Newman. There has only been one case of aggression on his point when she once bit him too hard while playing. He brought a little blood but it was just a nip to correct her. So, I understood his position while still correcting him.

    Yesterday he became aggressive towards her. He attacked her once on the porch drawing blood from a bite to her ear. I promptly jumped on him and forced him to show his belly. After he settled into the submissive position and chilled I let him back up. Not more than 10 mins later he went for her again. This time drawing blood from her leg and lip. I pulled him off and I put her inside. He has a pen and it seems like he believes that he owns it, as he went down there after the fight. I decided it was time to correct him on this issue. I pulled him out of the pen and he had the temerity to raise hackles and growl at me. I roughly threw him on his back and held him until his fugue subsided. Within 30 mins. he was back to normal and the two were playing with each other.

    Now, I am trying to figure out what is going on with him. Interesting enough the day before I came out back to see them chewing on a rabbit carcass. The bottom half anyway. It was a fresh kill. Not sure if they found it or killed it themselves. They never have brought one home before. Lilly, being a dog, kept rolling in the carcass until I took it away from them both. So, I'm of the belief that the attacks yesterday might have come because Newman was smelling the rabbit scent on Lilly. I dunno. I gave them both baths today. We will see.

    Any ideas?
    Unlike Luctor, I don't have much experience with pit-bulls, but I'll offer my two cents anyway.

    First of all, I concur that you probably shouldn't be trying to for a dog into a submissive position. The dog may see you as an aggressor and become worse. I would probably monitor all of their interactions for a while. If there is any growling, separate immediately. If they seem to be getting along, reward with a small treat so that they associate the other dog with good things.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    I don't often force him to show his belly or use force against him. This was exceptional in that he would not obey a voice command to "pen-up" while attacking. I have used his pen in much the same way you say to use a bench. However, he has become possessive of that. It seems to have become a reward instead of a correction. That is why I pulled him from the pen and shut the door for a time. Play fighting is one thing. This was outright aggression, which I will not have. Not in an 80# pit-bull. And he is usually NOT like this. That is why I was wondering if his response was do to the scent of the rabbit and her diminutive stature compared to him. She only weighs 32#.
    Put a blanket over it while he's in it. Leave the room. Come back half an hour later. See if he likes to behave in order to get out. Tough love.. I am sure however that a pitt and a jack russle are an ideal combination. Both high energy dogs. Both pretty rough in their behavior generally.

    I do recommend not using treats in training. They should respect you for who you are and you should be able to reward them by saying they are good dogs. Treats are for exceptional behavior, maybe. But you don't want a dog that won't do anything because the dog damn well knows you currently are not carrying treats.. Not a good strategy IMO. Certainly not necessary.
    Last edited by luctor-et-emergo; 05-29-2016 at 01:23 PM.
    "I am a bird"

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by luctor-et-emergo View Post
    Put a blanket over it while he's in it. Leave the room. Come back half an hour later. See if he likes to behave in order to get out.
    The pen is a 20' x 20' enclosure. He would rather spend most of his time in it. It seems to be his "safe-space." And it has been a good tool. Anytime a stranger shows up he will bark and guard until I tell him to "pen up" at which point he will head directly to it. But, like I mentioned he became aggressive about it so I had to put him out of it and close the door for a bit. To his much agitated consternation. When I went to open and let him in again I made him sit, then lie down, before I granted him access. He was none to happy but eventually complied. I think perhaps he needs to realize that his favorite place is a privilege that only I can grant.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Havnes View Post
    Unlike Luctor, I don't have much experience with pit-bulls, but I'll offer my two cents anyway.

    First of all, I concur that you probably shouldn't be trying to for a dog into a submissive position. The dog may see you as an aggressor and become worse. I would probably monitor all of their interactions for a while. If there is any growling, separate immediately. If they seem to be getting along, reward with a small treat so that they associate the other dog with good things.
    The most important thing in this all is that you should be calm and decisive. If you're not calm, the dog will take over. You lose. You are the leader, be the leader, the dog will follow. Even the most edgy dogs, the ones owners warn you not to pet, are always nice to me since I'm aware of that. But I'm someone who likes to get ambushed by a 150lb mastiff. More than I weigh but it's awesome when they put their paws on your shoulders and lick your face . (Gross, but I like it.)
    Last edited by luctor-et-emergo; 05-29-2016 at 01:30 PM.
    "I am a bird"

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by luctor-et-emergo View Post
    The most important thing in this all is that you should be calm and decisive. If you're not calm, the dog will take over. You lose. You are the leader, be the leader, the dog will follow. Even the most edgy dogs, the ones owners warn you not to pet, are always nice to me since I'm aware of that.
    I don't get agitated. My commands are firm and calm and he usually is compliant. This was an exceptional day that called for exceptional measures.



  10. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    The pen is a 20' x 20' enclosure. He would rather spend most of his time in it. It seems to be his "safe-space." And it has been a good tool. Anytime a stranger shows up he will bark and guard until I tell him to "pen up" at which point he will head directly to it. But, like I mentioned he became aggressive about it so I had to put him out of it and close the door for a bit. To his much agitated consternation. When I went to open and let him in again I made him sit, then lie down, before I granted him access. He was none to happy but eventually complied. I think perhaps he needs to realize that his favorite place is a privilege that only I can grant.
    100% correct.
    "I am a bird"

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by luctor-et-emergo View Post
    100% correct.
    The whole time I held him on his back I was thinking of the dog trainer Cesar. At first he was snarling and eventually as his angst left him and he became submissive. After that he seemed to be fine and eventually played nicely with Lilly. I still don't trust him around her unless I am there but will have to just watch over the next period. Like I mentioned I am wondering if it is because Lilly rubbed the rabbit scent on herself. I dunno. Just all of a sudden out of character for him.

  13. #11
    I defer to Damian tv, he has a knack with dogs.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRey View Post
    Do you think it's a coincidence that the most cherished standard of the Ron Paul campaign was a sign highlighting the word "love" inside the word "revolution"? A revolution not based on love is a revolution doomed to failure. So, at the risk of sounding corny, I just wanted to let you know that, wherever you stand on any of these hot-button issues, and even if we might have exchanged bitter words or harsh sentiments in the past, I love each and every one of you - no exceptions!

    "When goods do not cross borders, soldiers will." Frederic Bastiat

    Peace.

  14. #12
    They'll probably eventually sort it out, on their own. If not euthanize the pit.

  15. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin Truth View Post
    They'll probably eventually sort it out, on their own. If not euthanize the pit.
    I don't think I am at the point of pulling the trigger of the .22 just yet. Thanks for your input though.

  16. #14
    Build him a pizza oven. He'll like that.
    Pfizer Macht Frei!

    Openly Straight Man, Danke, Awarded Top Rated Influencer. Community Standards Enforcer.


    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!

    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  17. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Danke View Post
    Build him a pizza oven. He'll like that.
    He's already possessive of his pen. If I build a pizza oven it will expressly be mine. No "if, no's, but's or growls.""

  18. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    I don't think I am at the point of pulling the trigger of the .22 just yet. Thanks for your input though.
    Actually I was just thinking of a 'permanent go to sleep' injection, by a vet. But, whatever. <shrug>



  19. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  20. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    The whole time I held him on his back I was thinking of the dog trainer Cesar. At first he was snarling and eventually as his angst left him and he became submissive. After that he seemed to be fine and eventually played nicely with Lilly. I still don't trust him around her unless I am there but will have to just watch over the next period. Like I mentioned I am wondering if it is because Lilly rubbed the rabbit scent on herself. I dunno. Just all of a sudden out of character for him.
    It could be. I don't know, you are the best judge of that. Probably if they get used to each other a bit more issues like rabbit scent will disappear.
    "I am a bird"

  21. #18


    Sounds like you handled it. Maybe his prey drive was overstimulated and the scent of the rabbit triggered him. Who knows but I would keep an eye on him for awhile, especially around fresh kills.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Paul View Post
    The intellectual battle for liberty can appear to be a lonely one at times. However, the numbers are not as important as the principles that we hold. Leonard Read always taught that "it's not a numbers game, but an ideological game." That's why it's important to continue to provide a principled philosophy as to what the role of government ought to be, despite the numbers that stare us in the face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Origanalist View Post
    This intellectually stimulating conversation is the reason I keep coming here.

  22. #19
    If I remember right Newman is still young?

    He's doing what all teenagers do and pushing his limits with you, and he's putting the pup in it's place...

    If he'd picked up the pup and shook it that would be different than nipping to the point of blood...

    Dogs are going to find, and fight to keep, their place in the pack.

    I wouldn't worry much about pups fighting a bit unless it's obviously getting out of hand but Newman bulling up toward you is an issue. You handled it correctly but watch for repeat behavior and escalate your response at the slightest infraction...(Escalate in dog NOT human behavior)

  23. #20
    Does the new dog also have a safe space and training to go to it?
    #NashvilleStrong

    ďIím a doctor. Thatís a baby.Ē~~~Dr. Manny Sethi

  24. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    I don't think I am at the point of pulling the trigger of the .22 just yet. Thanks for your input though.
    I would not advise on a dog I do knot know.
    I suggest you work with him and come to an understanding.
    I know I could not keep an aggressive dog,, regardless of breed. Best of luck.
    Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.
    Ron Paul 2004

    Registered Ron Paul supporter # 2202
    It's all about Freedom

  25. #22
    @phill4paul - When you "force" them to show you belly, do they do it voluntarily or is there physical manipulation of their body to show belly? If you have to touch them at all in order to achieve submission, then youre fooling yourself and they arent really submitting, just going into a position that youre putting them in to. I think you are fully aware it isnt about controlling the body, but the mind. Showing belling completely voluntarily is only a reflection that the dogs mind is submitting. A truly balanced dog requires nothing more than a light touch, like a tap on a shoulder or a light tug on a leash. If you have to do anything more than a touch, then something else is off in the dogs behavior. During training, such as teaching to sit, a touch should only be used as a guide. Touching a dogs back toward their tail and repeating the word to "sit" creates an association that the word you are using has "something" to do with that part of their body. "Shake" while lightly squeezing a dogs paw helps to create the initial association between the word and that part of their body. I only use a touch to break a dogs focus on something like another dog.

    Strong pokes are reserved only when a dog is on their way to a "red zone" or "dangerous" behavior. I issue my pokes as strong corrections with a Dominant and Calm expression of my stance, more Dominant than Calm in this case, but both are expressed. Once in a "red zone", there is no type of touch that will break that focus, including hits. Only thing you can do at that point is total restraint and redirect. "Red zone" means that the dog has lost total control over their behavior and does not necessarily indicate the state of mind in every fight. If you and me were to be in a physical brawl, one might misinterpret that as "red zone", but unless one of us hits absolute panic state, despite being in a fight, that isnt "red zone". Red zone is when the dog loses all control of themselves and acts of aggression are not always "red zone". "Red zone" is when a total mauling occurs, not a simple nip or warning bite. In red zone states, get the dog out of the situation so what ever they are reacting to is no longer present, then it is just a matter of time. A good example of a red zone behavior is a person who is terrified of spiders. They see a spider and completely freak out and lose self control. That is when people literally piss their pants, and is a result of all self control. At that point in time, that person can be put into a "time out" which isnt really a "correction" but an opportunity for them to calm down, and is done with a space they can feel safe. Saw a spider outside? Go inside and catch your breath, but no further corrections are necessary because they wont respond as you expect them to. Never ever allow yourself to go into a "red zone" expression of behavior in the presence of a dog, ever. You can immediately destroy their image of you as a Calm Dominant pack leader. What happens there is if they think you dont have self control, they will try to take your place on the food chain and try to establish themselves as dominant over you. That takes quite a while to repair, even from a single incident. I dont think your dog sounds like a "red zone" case.

    In general, dogs usually want two things, Trust and Respect. It sounds to me like one of those things is missing. Ive met plenty of dogs, so its easy to recognize the combinations of the two. The real goal is to Trust you enough to submit and Respect you enough to obey. If one of those things is not had, then I think you see behavioral issues like you describe. I think what may be missing in the dog's mind is the Trust.

    Next, it is one thing for them to recognize you as pack leader, but another thing entirely to offer the same Trust and Respect to other members of your "pack". They also have to learn that all other humans are given a higher position of authority than they are. So even if they think of you as pack leader, if the dog thinks they are higher in the chain of command than another human, they will show the other person some level of disrespect.

    We misinterpret a lot of issues and are too quick to label them as aggressive. For example, possessive is not the same as aggressive. Insecure is also not the same as aggressive. But both possessive and insecure can be easily misinterpreted as aggressive because both can lead to nipping and or biting. I think that is the key thing to address this dogs behavior. The dog wants to have a pack in which it can both trust and respect all members of its pack, which includes humans. If they see that leadership is lacking, the dog may think of itself as being superior to that pack member, which again also includes humans. They may not challenge the alpha, but will challenge their perceived authority of humans they dont think of as pack leader. Another behavior I see a lot in people is they misinterpret Fear as Submission. Fear is not submission and should not be encouraged by any means. If a dog is expressing fear, then tone down any expressions of Dominance and try to make sure the dog sees you as more Calm than Dominant. Misinterpretations of a dogs behavior causes us to issue incorrect adjustments to the dogs behavior. Correctly identifying a dogs state is very important. The result of either lack of trust or lack of respect may also be misinterpreted as "the dog needs training". Dogs arent stupid. They can choose, just as we can, to disregard orders even though they know and understand the command. If a dog doesnt obey, then it isnt a matter of "lack of knowledge" on the dogs part, but that is an expression that you have not earned their Respect.

    I think that Balance is the key to influencing a dogs behavior, which means it needs both positive and negative reinforcement from all humans in order for the dog to recognize its place. The dog may be provided balanced feedback from the pack leader, but not from the other members of the pack. That means that to adjust the dogs behavior, the other humans treatment of the dog is really what will address the issue as it establishes both trust and respect. Once both trust and respect is had, then it is merely a matter of offering appropriate responses at the appropriate times. For example, if you are teaching a dog to bring a ball back to you and they dont do what you want, correction at that time will cause confusion in the dog, so just withhold praise, but dont correct them.

    Now, being that you mentioned both Pit Bull and Jack Russel, both breeds are known for being very high energy. First thing I would suggest is exercise the living $#@! out of the dog. That will get rid of any pent up energy and they will not have as much energy to resist with. If they arent getting enough exercise, they could be pent up. Once pent up, any other humans they see as unbalanced, the dog will tend to offer more challenge to the human.

    I think the last thing is that the goal needs to be clearly defined. It isnt enough to have just submission but Calm Submission. That is achieved with the timing of correction and praise. Rewarding submission when a dog isnt calm can create insecurity. Once the dog submits, keep it in a submissive state until calmness is achieved. Physically that is usually expressed by a fairly loud and audible "sigh". That is where the patience is needed. Personally, I just continue to challenge the dog once they submit and hold my Calm and dominant position and refrain from either correction or reward until I hear that audible sigh. It can take a few minutes to achieve that. Once they give me the audible sigh, then I very calmly and less dominantly praise the $#@! out of them for that. If they dont calm down, expressed by fast breathing or shaking, then odds are they are pent up and need to be exercised.

    I think what may work well for this dog is to have everyone the dog doesnt respect is to create a positive association between that person and the dog. Have those people take the dog for a walk. The behavior of both the dog and the person is critical. If the person walking the dog is not calm and dominant, most importantly calm, then the dog will respond to that, and not in a way that you want. If they are calm, that starts to create the positive association in the dogs mind with that person. Getting that true calmness out of the person walking them is probably the hardest part, but the calmer they are, the more the dog starts to relax its stance also. They start to see this person as a "provider of positive reinforcement" and a sense that "what the dog is feeling matters to the person that is walking them". It balances their mental image of them as being both trustworthy and that they should respect that person. Once they both Trust and Respect you, then balanced applications of positive and negative reinforcements become effective.

    Personal story. I have two Giant Alaskan Malamutes. One I got at 2 years old, and when I got her, she was terrified of vacuum cleaners. Very close to red zone levels of panic. She snapped and growled at the vacuum when ever I got within five feet of her with it. This was not that difficult to correct. I turned on the vacuum, let it rest against a chair, then kind of cornered her and just sat down next to her expressing as much calmness as I could with very little dominance. It took about five minutes and she adjusted her behavior because she could see that I did not see the vacuum as a threat. When I sat down, I made an audible sigh as if I were intent on fully relaxing and made sure that she saw my calmness. Once she started to relax, I issued a little bit of praise. The more she relaxed, the more I calmly praised her. I had to do this about every time I vacuumed for about a month. After that, she now lets me use the hose end of the vacuum on her, and when vacuuming, I have to tell her to get up so I can vacuum where she is laying. She learned to ignore the noisy vacuum because she doesnt associate it with being a threat. She is also a 150 pounds so you know she is quite strong.

    In general, every human in your pack needs to maintain a state of Calm Dominance, earn their Trust and Respect by providing Balanced positive and negative reinforcements of behavior when the dog offers true Calmness and Submission.

     
    The black and white one is my girl that was terrified of the vacuum.





    "Lakomi is an upper-mid content wolfdog who lives in a sanctuary. She was found surviving in the wild at 8 months old, however it quickly became apparent that she had been bred and partially raised in captivity. At the time of her rescue she was wearing a harness intended for an 8 week old. Her skin had grown over the harness and removing it took hours of surgery and months of medication to fight an infection that nearly took her life. When I first got to the sanctuary I was told that she was crazy and wouldn't ever be socialized. Her enclosure has fences that are 14 feet high because she would routinely jump or climb up 12 foot fencing and hang by her jaw at the top. Since I began working on socialization with her that behavior has stopped. She took about two months of daily exposure before she would allow physical contact, but once that wall came down she quickly became playful, sweet, loving, and my personal favorite animal in our charge. Lakomi is a gorgeous example of the redemptive power of love, and being able to know her is one of the greatest privileges of my life.
    A side note: the fur on her belly is thin because she had been spayed several months prior to this video. She is entirely healthy "

    Last edited by DamianTV; 05-29-2016 at 06:05 PM.
    1776 > 1984

    The FAILURE of the United States Government to operate and maintain an
    Honest Money System , which frees the ordinary man from the clutches of the money manipulators, is the single largest contributing factor to the World's current Economic Crisis.

    The Elimination of Privacy is the Architecture of Genocide

    Belief, Money, and Violence are the three ways all people are controlled

    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Our central bank is not privately owned.

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    If I remember right Newman is still young?

    He's doing what all teenagers do and pushing his limits with you, and he's putting the pup in it's place...

    If he'd picked up the pup and shook it that would be different than nipping to the point of blood...

    Dogs are going to find, and fight to keep, their place in the pack.

    I wouldn't worry much about pups fighting a bit unless it's obviously getting out of hand but Newman bulling up toward you is an issue. You handled it correctly but watch for repeat behavior and escalate your response at the slightest infraction...(Escalate in dog NOT human behavior)
    You have that right. Coming on 3 yrs. An Adolescence in human terms. And I agree with your point. He is 80#, she is 32#, her whole head fits in his mouth. If he wanted to seriously injure or kill he could have. Before I made it to him to pull him away. She went submissive as she has always done. But, he just kept pushing. And didn't pull off on a command. And, yes, the bullying up to me is a SERIOUS issue. His new found aggression is something that I will not tolerate. We had the family reunion this week. There were my grand-nephews at 10 yrs. and 8 yrs. Newman did well with them. Perhaps all the family might have stressed him. I dunno. But, simply put, if he does not come to an accord soon then.....
    If I cannot trust him to conduct himself with another small dog then I cannot trust him to conduct himself with a small human. And as sad as it may seem it might have to end up as Ronin advised.
    But we are far from that. Today was a good day.
    I shut him out of his pen before we went to a friends dinner. Made him sit and lie before entry. When we came home let him out, let Lilly out of her in-house pen. Fed them close to each other. He had the temerity to growl at me when I pet him while he was eating. Took his bowl from him. Had him eat from the bowl that I held in my hands.
    I dunno, he's being strange. Adolescence, as you say, I think you are right.

  27. #24
    Thanks Damian. Your advise is pretty much a thread killer. I hope you don't think that I'm a dog abuser or such. Honestly there is Trust and Respect between myself and Newman. Or has been. Honestly there has been a few "possessive" traits that I need to correct him on. The food bowl being on. For the next coupla days he will eat his food from the dog bowl while I hold it in my hands. On the other hand there are some things that should be his according to some things I have read. We have a huge dog bed that was passed down from a yuuge American Bulldog. I forced both to share it and Newman jut got to the point he abandoned it and went to the couch. So he put himself outside the family unit. Tonight I made the call that his bed is his bed and Lilly has her own. End of story. You sleep here and you sleep here. Together but seperate.
    Last edited by phill4paul; 05-30-2016 at 12:02 AM.



  28. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  29. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by DamianTV View Post
    [MENTION=10850]- When you "force" them to show you belly, do they do it voluntarily or is there physical manipulation of their body to show belly?
    I've never forced or even asked to be shown the belly. My reaction was because he became too belligerent. I truthfully didn't like doing it, but it did serve it's pupose. At least as far as I can tell. He has been very good today. I did not do it in anger. I did have to use force. Once he was under me in a submisive position I spoke in calming tones. "Good boy", etc. Eventually he let out one huge "huuuumph" and relaxed. Then I let him up and he licked my face like Piity's do.

  30. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by DamianTV View Post

    In general, dogs usually want two things, Trust and Respect. It sounds to me like one of those things is missing. Ive met plenty of dogs, so its easy to recognize the combinations of the two. The real goal is to Trust you enough to submit and Respect you enough to obey. If one of those things is not had, then I think you see behavioral issues like you describe. I think what may be missing in the dog's mind is the Trust.
    This is quite possible with the addition of the rescue dog. I dunno. I've never really favored her. At the on set he loved her. I didn't have to play "tug-tug" everyday with him because she and him did it together. It was a match made in heaven. It still is when he is getting along. Even after the night of the two attacks after I denied him the pen and forced him to "show belly" he eventually clamed down and played nice with her. To the point of letting her take the lead of the ball and rope for a bit of time. Again. Strangeness and trying to figure it out.

  31. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by DamianTV View Post

    I think what may work well for this dog is to have everyone the dog doesnt respect is to create a positive association between that person and the dog. Have those people take the dog for a walk. The behavior of both the dog and the person is critical. If the person walking the dog is not calm and dominant, most importantly calm, then the dog will respond to that, and not in a way that you want. If they are calm, that starts to create the positive association in the dogs mind with that person. Getting that true calmness out of the person walking them is probably the hardest part, but the calmer they are, the more the dog starts to relax its stance also. They start to see this person as a "provider of positive reinforcement" and a sense that "what the dog is feeling matters to the person that is walking them". It balances their mental image of them as being both trustworthy and that they should respect that person. Once they both Trust and Respect you, then balanced applications of positive and negative reinforcements become effective.
    This is something that needs work. The S.O. gets no respect ala Rodney Dangerfield. He honestly thinks his place in the pack is above her. She is going to have to work at being the alpha-she wolf. I'll speak with her about it tomorrow. As the alpha I suppose that my dictates would be adhered to but that is not what truly happens. The submissive will always strive to up itself in the pack. Even if it is just ignoring commands. I'm going to have to get my S.O. to start working with him and her this next week.
    Last edited by phill4paul; 05-30-2016 at 12:41 AM.

  32. #28
    I have the solution to all that ails you. I kid not

    Dog Training Camp. Run by the husband of our own Jessica Hult. Better miracle workers for dogs are not to be found in this state. The make Caesar Millan look like a piker.

    https://www.dogtrainingcampusa.com/

    This place is our folks, and Donnie the guy in charge is no joke the best dog trainer in NC probably east of the Miss.

    If your issue can be fixed, go there talk to them, and it will be fixed. They will train your dog, and teach you how to effect and maintain that training.

  33. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by GunnyFreedom View Post
    I have the solution to all that ails you. I kid not

    Dog Training Camp. Run by the husband of our own Jessica Hult. Better miracle workers for dogs are not to be found in this state. The make Caesar Millan look like a piker.

    https://www.dogtrainingcampusa.com/

    This place is our folks, and Donnie the guy in charge is no joke the best dog trainer in NC probably east of the Miss.

    If your issue can be fixed, go there talk to them, and it will be fixed. They will train your dog, and teach you how to effect and maintain that training.
    Thanks for the referral. But they are on the other side of the state and not sure I want to sink $2k+ into the fixin'. Again thanks, and if we do not come to a resolve this might be an option. More than likely we will just find a new home for Lilly if it can't be resolved.

  34. #30
    Alright, I have a couple of things for you to work on.

    Lets start with building trust. Have the dog eat the dog food out of your hand, literally. Its a calm way that you establish your leadership and authority as well as a source of all things positive. It will be kind of annoying but getting them to eat out of your hand builds that trust and helps them to understand what state of mind you want them to be in when they take the food.

    Next, lets redirect some of that negative energy and burn off the dogs. Need to have daily walks, on a leash. Same thing as above, it shows them who is the boss, and what being the boss means. Being boss means youre the source of all things positive. From the dog's point of view, it takes a hell of a lot of stress off of them knowing that someone else very capable is in charge, and allows them an opportunity to relax and see that submitting is a good thing.

    It is a pain as having a dog is a full time job. To be balanced, they are like kids and need almost constant attention.

    I believe you arent a dog abuser, and even harsh corrections arent abuse. We both know what abuse truly is and what it truly is not. Not worried about that at all. But what youre saying that youre doing isnt working, and its just a matter of learning why things arent working that hold us back from moving forward. Easy thing to do is look at everything from the dogs point of view with limited understanding of language and as a "child". That is when most people find that inner leader, and its just a matter of presenting things to a dog in a context they can understand.

    As far as what Gunny said, also very worth while to check out. I have a point of view and to get a better understanding of what goes on between a dogs ears, the more points of view of experienced handlers you can get, the better. If they are local, that is probably the best since Im west coast here...
    1776 > 1984

    The FAILURE of the United States Government to operate and maintain an
    Honest Money System , which frees the ordinary man from the clutches of the money manipulators, is the single largest contributing factor to the World's current Economic Crisis.

    The Elimination of Privacy is the Architecture of Genocide

    Belief, Money, and Violence are the three ways all people are controlled

    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Our central bank is not privately owned.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •