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Thread: Philly Wants To Tax Soda To Raise Money For Schools

  1. #1

    Philly Wants To Tax Soda To Raise Money For Schools

    Philadelphia's new mayor wants to do something few American cities have done: pass a tax on soda and other sugary drinks.

    So far, Berkeley, Calif., has been the only U.S. city to approve such a tax. That measure was aimed at reducing soda consumption (and the negative health effects that go along with drinking too much of it).

    But in Philly, the tax isn't being promoted as a scheme to bring down the city's high rates of obesity or diabetes. Mayor Jim Kenney says he wants to use the revenue for projects that benefit residents in a city with a 26 percent poverty rate, the highest of America's largest cities. He argues soda companies make big money and often market their products to low-income people.

    "What we're looking to do is to take some of that profit, to put it back into the neighborhoods that have been their biggest customers, to improve the lives and opportunities for the people who live there," he said at a rally promoting the tax last month.

    Kenney claims a tax of 3 cents per ounce of soda, iced-tea and other sugary drinks — levied on beverage distributors — would generate more than $400 million over the next five years. The money would help fund a plan for universal pre-K and community schools that offer services like health care, as well as major renovations to parks, recreation centers and libraries.

    So far, no one is complaining about Kenney's intentions, but Daniel Grace, who heads up the local Teamsters Union, says there has to be a better way to raise money. The union represents about 2,000 people who work in bottling plants and drive delivery trucks.

    His argument against the tax boils down to this: It would likely drive up the price of soda (just as the Berkeley tax has done), which, in turn, will reduce the consumption of sugary drinks. "When the demand goes down, they don't need as many [workers] as they have today," he says.

    The Teamsters Union has printed hundreds of "No soda tax" buttons and T-shirts and has been handing out leaflets.

    And right after Kenney proposed the measure, the American Beverage Association — a national trade group that previously shelled out more than $9 million fighting Berkeley's soda tax — launched a social media campaign against the Philadelphia proposal and started running ads on local radio stations calling it a "grocery tax on the kind of drinks we buy for our family."

    But while the association's campaigns target Philadelphia residents, the fate of the soda tax ultimately lies in the hands of the city council, which will make its final decision in June. Council president Darrell Clarke has not taken a side yet, but he's concerned the burden would fall hardest on those Kenney is trying to help: the poor. "It doesn't take a whole lot of analysis to determine where those sugary drinks are being sold," he says. "So the question is, is that fair?"

    The Rev. Adan Mairena, who is part of a group supporting the tax, estimates 80 percent of his congregation in North Philadelphia lives below the poverty line and admits that some of them are worried about paying more for these drinks. He's urging skeptics to take the long view.

    "If we pass this, it's going to provide more opportunities in the long run and it's going to make us a better people, a better community," he says.

    At a supermarket just a few miles away, Maribel Alago says she disagrees. She points out the city raised property taxes last year. Plus, there's a $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes to help the cash-strapped school district.

    "People cannot barely afford anything nowadays," Alago says. "Now they going to tax soda, too."

    Mayor Kenney says if the city council doesn't approve the tax, there's no other way to pay for expanded pre-K or revamped rec centers. Plan B is going without those things.
    http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/...ey-for-schools
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Paul View Post
    The intellectual battle for liberty can appear to be a lonely one at times. However, the numbers are not as important as the principles that we hold. Leonard Read always taught that "it's not a numbers game, but an ideological game." That's why it's important to continue to provide a principled philosophy as to what the role of government ought to be, despite the numbers that stare us in the face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Origanalist View Post
    This intellectually stimulating conversation is the reason I keep coming here.



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  3. #2
    let me blow your mind:


    what if we only taxed the parents of enrolled students?


    omg!

    'We endorse the idea of voluntarism; self-responsibility: Family, friends, and churches to solve problems, rather than saying that some monolithic government is going to make you take care of yourself and be a better person. It's a preposterous notion: It never worked, it never will. The government can't make you a better person; it can't make you follow good habits.' - Ron Paul 1988

    Awareness is the Root of Liberation Revolution is Action upon Revelation

    'Resistance and Disobedience in Economic Activity is the Most Moral Human Action Possible' - SEK3

    Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta movebo.

    ...the familiar ritual of institutional self-absolution...
    ...for protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment...


  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by presence View Post
    let me blow your mind:


    what if we only taxed the parents of enrolled students?


    omg!
    Why do you hate children and education?

    I was called greedy when I complained about paying school taxes for schools my sons don't attend.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Paul View Post
    The intellectual battle for liberty can appear to be a lonely one at times. However, the numbers are not as important as the principles that we hold. Leonard Read always taught that "it's not a numbers game, but an ideological game." That's why it's important to continue to provide a principled philosophy as to what the role of government ought to be, despite the numbers that stare us in the face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Origanalist View Post
    This intellectually stimulating conversation is the reason I keep coming here.

  5. #4
    because government education is about ethical parity with public funded abortions in my book?

    'We endorse the idea of voluntarism; self-responsibility: Family, friends, and churches to solve problems, rather than saying that some monolithic government is going to make you take care of yourself and be a better person. It's a preposterous notion: It never worked, it never will. The government can't make you a better person; it can't make you follow good habits.' - Ron Paul 1988

    Awareness is the Root of Liberation Revolution is Action upon Revelation

    'Resistance and Disobedience in Economic Activity is the Most Moral Human Action Possible' - SEK3

    Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta movebo.

    ...the familiar ritual of institutional self-absolution...
    ...for protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment...


  6. #5
    It is a 3 cents per ounce tax, doubling the price of soda. People drinking lots of soda will just buy drinks and groceries out of town. There are many mom/pop corner stores that are going to go out of business. With people drink less soda and buying it outside the city, this will not produce the revenue the city expects it will get.

    It makes me scratch my head. Subsidize farmers to produce unhealthy high fructose corn syrup then tax it again, it drinks.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by dean.engelhardt View Post
    People drinking lots of soda will just buy drinks and groceries out of town.
    Somehow I see someone strangled to death for selling a loosie can of soda without tax stamp.

    'We endorse the idea of voluntarism; self-responsibility: Family, friends, and churches to solve problems, rather than saying that some monolithic government is going to make you take care of yourself and be a better person. It's a preposterous notion: It never worked, it never will. The government can't make you a better person; it can't make you follow good habits.' - Ron Paul 1988

    Awareness is the Root of Liberation Revolution is Action upon Revelation

    'Resistance and Disobedience in Economic Activity is the Most Moral Human Action Possible' - SEK3

    Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta movebo.

    ...the familiar ritual of institutional self-absolution...
    ...for protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment...


  8. #7
    I think Philly should tax everything they do not already .

  9. #8
    So the people that are poor pay twice as much for their soda so the government can take half the money and inefficiently give it back to the people that buy the soda.



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  11. #9
    Best idea: close the schools.
    Through lives and lives shalt thou pay, O' king.

    Pray for reset.


  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by presence View Post
    let me blow your mind:


    what if we only taxed the parents of enrolled students?


    omg!
    Theye have refused their Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

    Theye have erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.

    Theye kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies

    Theye have combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution,

    For protecting them, by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

    For cutting off our Trade with parts of the world:

    For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

    For depriving us in many cases, of the benefit of Trial by Jury:

    Theye plundered and destroyed the lives of our people.

    Theye are at this time transporting Armies of Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & Perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy of a civilized nation.

  13. #11
    It wasn't for the children? I. AM. SHOCKED.

    After soda tax switch, Philly City Council wants to know: Why are we broke?

    City Council members were surprised to learn Wednesday that some of the revenue from a soda tax the body preliminarily approved will go toward bolstering the city’s coffers — and now they’re planning hearings to investigate “the true financial health” of the city.

    Late Wednesday, a revamped 1.5 cent-per-ounce soda tax got a big thumbs up from City Council, but the public and council members learned that afternoon that not all the estimated $400 million in revenue over the next five years will go toward Mayor Jim Kenney’s initiatives like pre-K, community schools and parks and recreation.

    If the city’s beverage tax is passed as is, some of the revenue will go toward boosting the city’s fund balance — that’s the difference between the amount of money the city spends versus what it brings in. Financial planners recommend cities have a “healthy” fund balance in order to have some financial flexibility. So think of it this way: You’d want a positive balance in your checking account, rather than having expenses exactly match income. If you don’t, it can negatively impact your credit rating.

    The city aims to have its fund balance reflect 6 to 8 percent of revenue. That would put a healthy fund balance at somewhere in the mid-$200 million range. This year, the city’s fund balance decreased from $150 million (already low) to $70 million. It’s projected to dip below $42 million in fiscal year 2017 and could reach as low as $15 million in fiscal year 2018 if there are no new sources of revenue. For context, the city spent $40 million last year on the Free Library alone.

    Why’d the fund balance drop so low? Finance Director Rob Dubow said Wednesday it had to do with ballooning labor costs, pension obligations and city contracts.

    Today, Councilwoman Maria Quiñones-Sánchez introduced a resolution on behalf of Council President Darrell Clarke that called for the City Council Committee on Fiscal Stability and Intergovernmental Cooperation to hold hearings this summer on what council members learned this week about the city’s sagging coffers.

    “City Council is deeply concerned about new information we have received in the last days of the budget process regarding Philadelphia’s true fiscal health,” Clarke said in a statement. “The legislative branch and the public we represent deserve greater transparency in how public dollars are raised, allocated, and utilized.”

    Most City Council members are in favor of increasing the city’s fund balance, but they say they didn’t find out until mid-afternoon Wednesday — just before their “Committee of the Whole” voted — that soda tax revenue would go toward the fund balance.

    During an evening City Council hearing Wednesday, multiple council members chastised the administration for failing to specify earlier that that’s where a portion of the money would go toward. Councilman Bill Greenlee asked Dubow if council members can expect greater transparency in the future. Dubow conceded the point: It should have been brought up sooner.

    “We heard it was all about the kids,” Greenlee said. “Sometime this afternoon we heard it’s also about the fund balance.”



    ...

    What the contribution to the fund balance will do is slightly bolster the city’s general fund, which is something closely watched by bond rating agencies. The city’s fund balance dipped into the negative in 2010 after the recession, and Moody’s downgraded the city and rated its outlook as negative.

    Since August 2010, the city’s outlook has been stable. But the bond rating agency has continued to recommend the city strengthen both its fund balance and its pension fund, which is staring down a $5 billion pension obligation hole, in order to qualify for a rating upgrade.

    Those who didn’t like the mayor’s proposed tax to begin with pounced Wednesday, saying the administration “pulled off a bait and switch job on Council and the citizens of Philadelphia.”

    “This tax was never about the kids,” Teamsters Local 830 Secretary Daniel Grace said in a statement. “It was about paying down the city’s debt service. The Sugary Drinks Tax is a sham and I doubt it will survive the legal challenge that’s surely to come.”
    http://billypenn.com/2016/06/09/afte...-are-we-broke/
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Paul View Post
    The intellectual battle for liberty can appear to be a lonely one at times. However, the numbers are not as important as the principles that we hold. Leonard Read always taught that "it's not a numbers game, but an ideological game." That's why it's important to continue to provide a principled philosophy as to what the role of government ought to be, despite the numbers that stare us in the face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Origanalist View Post
    This intellectually stimulating conversation is the reason I keep coming here.

  14. #12
    Firstly, as an ex-Philly resident I can say without equivocation that it is one of the great American $#@!-holes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanimal View Post
    [Philly's filthy mayor] argues soda companies make big money
    Typical looter mentality.

    and often market their products to low-income people.
    As if this were a bad thing. SOMETHING'S got to kill them off. 1/2

    "What we're looking to do is to take some of that profit, to put it back into the neighborhoods that have been their biggest customers, to improve the lives and opportunities for the people who live there," he said at a rally promoting the tax last month.
    What could possibly go wrong?

    Kenney claims a tax of 3 cents per ounce of soda,
    Holy hell... this bastard breathes some new life into the notion of "greed".

    iced-tea and other sugary drinks — levied on beverage distributors — would generate more than $400 million over the next five years.
    Who levy it on their customers, who levy it on the poor trash this dumb bastard of a mayor says he is trying to "help". Those with the means will shop just outside the city, saying "ha ha ha... $#@! you Mayor douche-canoe"

    One mo' tahm... what could possibly go wrong?

    The money would help fund a plan for universal pre-K and community schools that offer services like health care, as well as major renovations to parks, recreation centers and libraries.
    Typical progressive liberal thought process there. City is going bankrupt and their solution is double-down on the redistribution of wealth.

    Mayor Kenney says if the city council doesn't approve the tax, there's no other way to pay for expanded pre-K or revamped rec centers. Plan B is going without those things.
    The YES solution!
    Through lives and lives shalt thou pay, O' king.

    Pray for reset.


  15. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanimal View Post
    It wasn't for the children? I. AM. SHOCKED.



    http://billypenn.com/2016/06/09/afte...-are-we-broke/
    Philly to burn to the waterline?

    Oh please... oh PLEASE...
    Through lives and lives shalt thou pay, O' king.

    Pray for reset.


  16. #14
    Blimp

    http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...d-mass-layoffs

    Two months into the city’s sweetened-beverage tax, supermarkets and distributors are reporting a 30 percent to 50 percent drop in beverage sales and are planning for layoffs.

    One of the city's largest distributors says it will cut 20 percent of its workforce in March, and an owner of six ShopRite stores in Philadelphia says he expects to shed 300 workers this spring.



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