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Thread: Rand's amendment to protect privacy from CISA fails 32-65

  1. #1

    Rand's amendment to protect privacy from CISA fails 32-65

    Rand's amendment had bipartisan support from Al Franken, Patrick Leahy, Ron Wyden, and Bernie Sanders and others. Tea Partiers like Mike Lee and Ted Cruz supported it as well. This is Bernie Sanders first vote for an Rand Paul amendment/bill if I am not mistaken.

    The full CISA-bill will be voted on later. Even the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) came out in agreement with Rand & co that this "cybersecurity"-bill could sweep away “important privacy protections”...

    ----
    from the Hill:
    Senate shoots down Paul's contested cyber amendment

    The Senate on Thursday struck down Sen. Rand Paul's controversial amendment to a major cybersecurity item that the bill's backers said could have killed the whole measure.

    The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) would shield companies from legal liability when sharing cyber-threat data with the government, in an effort to boost the public-private exchange of information on hackers.

    The amendment from the Kentucky Republican, who is running for president, would have stripped this liability immunity from any company found breaking a user or privacy agreement with its customers. The offering received 32 votes, short of the simple majority needed to pass.

    CISA has split traditional industries like finance and retail, which argue they need the legal assurance, and privacy groups, which say CISA will give private companies too much leeway to share Americans’ personal data with the government.

    Paul, who has made a name for himself and his 2016 campaign by siding with privacy and civil liberties groups on issues such as government surveillance, has taken a strong stance against CISA. On his campaign website, he said the bill “would transform websites into government spies.”

    On Thursday, he took the floor to argue that his amendment would implement much-needed privacy protections into CISA.

    “This bill says that if a company violates [the privacy agreement] in sharing your information, that there will be legal immunity for that company,” Paul said. “I think that weakens privacy.”

    “It makes your privacy agreement not really worth the paper it’s written on,” he added.

    In the hours leading up to the vote on Paul’s proposal, industry groups banded together to strongly oppose the Kentucky Republican’s efforts.
    read more:
    http://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/257743-senate-shoots-down-pauls-controversial-cyber-amendment



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  3. #2
    Seriously, what sorta slime votes against this?

  4. #3
    Fixed below
    Last edited by kbs021; 10-22-2015 at 09:10 PM.

  5. #4
    ted Cruz disappointed advocates of internet freedom on Thursday, voting for the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), a bill that incentivizes businesses to turn over third party records to both the government and other businesses for purposes of “cyber security”. Civil liberties advocates such as the ACLU, Rand Paul and a slew of major tech companies such as Google and Apple have come out against CISA, arguing that it essentially amounts to government surveillance. Though no explanation has come from Cruz’s office, it is a vote that is likely to stun many of his supporters.This is contrary to Cruz’s stated support of internet freedom, having campaigned on the issue both very recently and extensively throughout the primary season.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by kbs021 View Post
    ted Cruz disappointed advocates of internet freedom on Thursday, voting for the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), a bill that incentivizes businesses to turn over third party records to both the government and other businesses for purposes of “cyber security”. Civil liberties advocates such as the ACLU, Rand Paul and a slew of major tech companies such as Google and Apple have come out against CISA, arguing that it essentially amounts to government surveillance. Though no explanation has come from Cruz’s office, it is a vote that is likely to stun many of his supporters.This is contrary to Cruz’s stated support of internet freedom, having campaigned on the issue both very recently and extensively throughout the primary season.
    http://www.********************.com/...votes-anyways/

    liberty conse.....you get the idea



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