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Thread: Lie and say you did something wrong and the punishment won't be as bad.

  1. #1

    Lie and say you did something wrong and the punishment won't be as bad.

    I moved around a lot and went to public and private schools and was home schooled as well.

    The two times I went to a public school in first and fifth grade, I had to go to the principal's office with a group of classmates. We were all accused of different types of misbehavior. In first grade, I was accused of throwing food for example. In sixth it was something else. Both times it was for something I didn't do.

    The principal started by asking one of the kids if he did what he was accused of. He said no and then was accused of lying and told that lying was worse than doing whatever he was accused of doing. After getting yelled at the kid admitted to it. He then went down the line asking each of us if we did what we were accused of. In the end all of us eventually admitted.

    It seemed like most of us were actually innocent. Granted, I was hyperactive and figured I was accused of the wrong crime, however I didn't like being forced to feel that I was a liar if I protested my genuine innocence. I'm wondering if this was actually some kind of programming. Did anyone else have a similar incident, or does anyone know if this is actual protocol.

    This may sound like an odd question, but it made an impact to have me questioning over 30 years later.



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  3. #2
    I haven't had that experience in school, but I did take the blame for an open intoxicants once and i wasn't even drinking. I was a passenger in a car and I didn't want to be stranded a long way from home.
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  4. #3
    Now you know why about 30 percent of people in prison are innocent.

    Quote Originally Posted by RJB View Post
    I moved around a lot and went to public and private schools and was home schooled as well.

    The two times I went to a public school in first and fifth grade, I had to go to the principal's office with a group of classmates. We were all accused of different types of misbehavior. In first grade, I was accused of throwing food for example. In sixth it was something else. Both times it was for something I didn't do.

    The principal started by asking one of the kids if he did what he was accused of. He said no and then was accused of lying and told that lying was worse than doing whatever he was accused of doing. After getting yelled at the kid admitted to it. He then went down the line asking each of us if we did what we were accused of. In the end all of us eventually admitted.

    It seemed like most of us were actually innocent. Granted, I was hyperactive and figured I was accused of the wrong crime, however I didn't like being forced to feel that I was a liar if I protested my genuine innocence. I'm wondering if this was actually some kind of programming. Did anyone else have a similar incident, or does anyone know if this is actual protocol.

    This may sound like an odd question, but it made an impact to have me questioning over 30 years later.

  5. #4
    Now you know why about 30 percent of people in prison are innocent.

    Quote Originally Posted by RJB View Post
    I moved around a lot and went to public and private schools and was home schooled as well.

    The two times I went to a public school in first and fifth grade, I had to go to the principal's office with a group of classmates. We were all accused of different types of misbehavior. In first grade, I was accused of throwing food for example. In sixth it was something else. Both times it was for something I didn't do.

    The principal started by asking one of the kids if he did what he was accused of. He said no and then was accused of lying and told that lying was worse than doing whatever he was accused of doing. After getting yelled at the kid admitted to it. He then went down the line asking each of us if we did what we were accused of. In the end all of us eventually admitted.

    It seemed like most of us were actually innocent. Granted, I was hyperactive and figured I was accused of the wrong crime, however I didn't like being forced to feel that I was a liar if I protested my genuine innocence. I'm wondering if this was actually some kind of programming. Did anyone else have a similar incident, or does anyone know if this is actual protocol.

    This may sound like an odd question, but it made an impact to have me questioning over 30 years later.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    Now you know why about 30 percent of people in prison are innocent.
    Seems like if you ask them, 100% are innocent.

  7. #6
    Attempted Possession of a Firearm by a Felon

    My wife owned a db field gun.

    http://pcosmar.blogspot.com/2006/08/...gone-well.html

    Plea bargain to save the farm. Should have fought it.

    /sigh
    Last edited by pcosmar; 10-18-2015 at 10:18 PM.
    Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.
    Ron Paul 2004

    Registered Ron Paul supporter # 2202
    It's all about Freedom

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.3D View Post
    Seems like if you ask them, 100% are innocent.
    Well, yeah sure...every con is innocent.

    But I am quite serious, my best SWAG is thirty percent really are.

  9. #8
    It's just a case of an authority figure being lazy and manipulative. Happens a lot in the workplace to.



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  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by RJB View Post
    I moved around a lot and went to public and private schools and was home schooled as well.

    The two times I went to a public school in first and fifth grade, I had to go to the principal's office with a group of classmates. We were all accused of different types of misbehavior. In first grade, I was accused of throwing food for example. In sixth it was something else. Both times it was for something I didn't do.

    The principal started by asking one of the kids if he did what he was accused of. He said no and then was accused of lying and told that lying was worse than doing whatever he was accused of doing. After getting yelled at the kid admitted to it. He then went down the line asking each of us if we did what we were accused of. In the end all of us eventually admitted.

    It seemed like most of us were actually innocent. Granted, I was hyperactive and figured I was accused of the wrong crime, however I didn't like being forced to feel that I was a liar if I protested my genuine innocence. I'm wondering if this was actually some kind of programming. Did anyone else have a similar incident, or does anyone know if this is actual protocol.

    This may sound like an odd question, but it made an impact to have me questioning over 30 years later.
    Police do the same thing when they arrest you.
    My website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/

    "No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” ~ Charles Dickens

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    Police do the same thing when they arrest you.
    An article that Phill posted about an old lady getting arrested for sticking to her story triggered this.

    It may have just been a coincidental error between the teacher and the principal. It just struck me as odd that this happened BOTH times I attended a public school that a groups of kids had to admit to something they didn't do. I was curious if this happened to anyone else or if this was institutionalized. It looks like it was just a coincidence.

  13. #11
    I'm not sure how you CAN consider this a coincidence.

    Public school does it to you as a kid, and then you "become an adult", and the legal system does the exact same thing?
    At least in public school they had actual offenses they would accuse you of, instead of just making up some legalese bull$#@!.

    In public school you go to pep rallies to root for your team and talk about beating the other team.
    In adult life you're expected to wear yellow ribbons.

    In public school you wait patiently in lines while people who should have figured out how to make the process faster something like 80 years ago continue to waste everyone's time.
    In adult life, you might go through the process of joining the military. Or you occasionally attempt to get a driver's license.

    In public school you're asked what a poem or short story means to YOU, and then you're told what it actually means.
    In adult life, you're asked an important policy question during the bumper music and then told what to think about it after the commercial.

    In public school you're told outright falsehoods like how artists had no sense of perspective before the Renaissance, people only recently stopped eating rotten meat, nobody showered, and how the 19th century was all robber barons oppressing the poor.
    In adult life, you're constantly barraged with the idea that people who lived before us had no idea what they were doing and that the ideas they espoused belong on the ash heap of history, regardless what they were and despite the outcomes of those ideas.

    In public school you're given a tiny locker when you're young, and then get a bigger locker as a perk for advancing in your "studies".
    In adult life you get a small house when you're young, and then get bigger houses and nicer cars for advancing in your "career"... and don't you dare ask whether you need all that extra space or the dozens of pieces of $#@!ty overpriced leftover wood furniture made of boards pieced together with hundreds of finger joints, or whether this is at all analogous to the fact that your giant senior year locker just ended up filled with garbage, too.

    Public school is the single biggest libertarian issue out there. Without a single exception. Every other statist issue feeds off of the fact that as children we are indoctrinated for 12 years.

    As I tell people frequently these days, homeschooling is dead simple. If you take out all the waiting in line and sitting quietly, you're only left with MAXIMUM two hours of quality instruction every day. And in reality the kid can do an hour and a half of that for himself.
    And taking out all the waiting around and doing what you're told is, for me, the entire point of why we homeschool.
    There are no crimes against people.
    There are only crimes against the state.
    And the state will never, ever choose to hold accountable its agents, because a thing can not commit a crime against itself.

  14. #12
    Except if you do, you just won't get elected. <shrug>

  15. #13
    I have heard the old lying is worse than what you were accused of spiel, FWIW.

    The entire process is brainwashing indoctrination.
    “The nationalist not only does not disapprove of atrocities committed by his own side, but he has a remarkable capacity for not even hearing about them.” --George Orwell

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  16. #14
    Best course of action when confronted by any authority: shut the $#@! up.

    Say nothing.

  17. #15
    7th grade and the Jr.High principle wanted to paddle my young ass, I told him no on no uncertain terms..

    He called my parents and got my dad who told him if he was man enough to have a go but either way I was getting an asswhuppin' when I got home.

    The principle was unsuccessful, my dad wasn't.

    However later on dad told me I'd have gotten it worse if I'd knuckled under at school.......

  18. #16
    7th grade, brain damage.



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  20. #17
    Yep. It's also a basic interrogation technique. Telling someone it'll be worse if you don't confess means that the interrogator is totally fishing.
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    ...I believe that when the government is capable of doing a thing, it will.
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    which one of yall fuckers wrote the "ron paul" racist news letters
    Quote Originally Posted by Dforkus View Post
    Zippy's posts are a great contribution.




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  21. #18
    As a young student I did not consider lying to cops and teachers lying at all . It was merely survival .

  22. #19
    Once I was accused of lying . I was late to school . Had a flat and changed it but only left with enough time to just make it because I worked really late . I checked in the office told 'em I was late . They asked why and I said I had a flat . He did not think so , so I went out and got it out of my trunk , carried it in and tossed it on his desk . I was rarely at school but I was not normally late . Usually I would be in home room because they took attendance and then I left for donuts and coffee .

  23. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthCarolinaLiberty View Post
    Yep. It's also a basic interrogation technique. Telling someone it'll be worse if you don't confess means that the interrogator is totally fishing.
    You should then ask: Worse? How?

  24. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.3D View Post
    Seems like if you ask them, 100% are innocent.
    How many have you actually asked?
    How many transcripts have you read?

    Sorry @Dr.3D but you just touched a belly reflex,,, and my claws came out..

    I have heard that said a lot,, and it sounds good,, but is untrue.

    I knew a lot that bragged about their crimes..Mine was a "class" crime,, and gave instant respect.
    Some did claim they were screwed. I read some transcripts,, and knew some innocent men in there.
    Few do say that really,, a couple perhaps.
    I have never said anything of the sort.. I did what I did..
    I plead guilty of the crimes voluntarily. (I signed my search warrant,,not a judge)
    I served time,, on three, twenty-five year sentences(concurrently) for armed robbery. Some in Prison and Some on Parole.
    I completed my sentence 2005.

    I never had a trial
    . Prove me wrong and win a prize. (hint,, sealed)
    Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.
    Ron Paul 2004

    Registered Ron Paul supporter # 2202
    It's all about Freedom

  25. #22
    I would say that in most cases my child lying to me would be worse than what he/she had allegedly done wrong.

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Schifference View Post
    I would say that in most cases my child lying to me would be worse than what he/she had allegedly done wrong.
    Yeah , but that is totally different than faculty or cops .



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