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Thread: More Than 1,000 People Have Been Killed by Police in 2014

  1. #1

    Exclamation More Than 1,000 People Have Been Killed by Police in 2014

    More Than 1,000 People Have Been Killed by Police in 2014

    http://reason.com/blog/2014/12/09/mo...-been-killed-b

    There are no frills to be found at www.killedbypolice.net. The site is just a simple spreadsheet. The information it contains, though, is invaluable. It is a list of every single person documented to have been killed by police in the United States in 2013 and 2014. There are links to a media report for every single death, as well as their names, ages, and when known, sex and race.

    The site is so valuable because, as we’ve noted previously, there is no reliable national database for keeping track of the number of people killed by police each year. The FBI tracks homicides by law enforcement officers, but participation is voluntary, and many agencies don’t participate. As I noted last week, Eric Garner’s death at the hands of a New York Police Department won’t show up in the FBI’s statistics for 2014 because the state of New York does not participate in the program.

    The FBI’s statistics for 2013 say that law enforcement officers killed 461 people that year. Killedbypolice.net apparently got its start last year. Using their system of monitoring by news report, they have calculated that police actually killed 748 people between May and December. That’s 287 more than the FBI reports for the whole year.

    And for 2014, which still has a couple of weeks left, the site has reported 1,029 people have been killed by police. That’s about a 30 percent increase over last year, though with four-month gap at the start of 2013 (measuring 25 percent of the year), it's possible the numbers would be much closer if we had January through April. Even with the FBI’s broken numbers, we know that 2013 marked a two-decade high in killings by police.

    Neither the site nor its Facebook page indicates who is responsible for compiling this information, and they’re protecting their identity by hosting the site through GoDaddy. We can’t talk to whoever is responsible for this database about how or why they started it and how much effort it is to keep track of this information. Here is a page for people to submit information to help improve the quality of the database.
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  3. #2
    How many indictments where issued to policeman for wrongdoing associated with the deaths?

  4. #3
    abolish the unions nation wide , then lift up the rock and see how many snakes there are across the country

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    More Than 1,000 People Have Been Killed by Police in 2014

    http://reason.com/blog/2014/12/09/mo...-been-killed-b

    There are no frills to be found at www.killedbypolice.net. The site is just a simple spreadsheet. The information it contains, though, is invaluable. It is a list of every single person documented to have been killed by police in the United States in 2013 and 2014. There are links to a media report for every single death, as well as their names, ages, and when known, sex and race.

    The site is so valuable because, as we’ve noted previously, there is no reliable national database for keeping track of the number of people killed by police each year. The FBI tracks homicides by law enforcement officers, but participation is voluntary, and many agencies don’t participate. As I noted last week, Eric Garner’s death at the hands of a New York Police Department won’t show up in the FBI’s statistics for 2014 because the state of New York does not participate in the program.

    The FBI’s statistics for 2013 say that law enforcement officers killed 461 people that year. Killedbypolice.net apparently got its start last year. Using their system of monitoring by news report, they have calculated that police actually killed 748 people between May and December. That’s 287 more than the FBI reports for the whole year.

    And for 2014, which still has a couple of weeks left, the site has reported 1,029 people have been killed by police. That’s about a 30 percent increase over last year, though with four-month gap at the start of 2013 (measuring 25 percent of the year), it's possible the numbers would be much closer if we had January through April. Even with the FBI’s broken numbers, we know that 2013 marked a two-decade high in killings by police.

    Neither the site nor its Facebook page indicates who is responsible for compiling this information, and they’re protecting their identity by hosting the site through GoDaddy. We can’t talk to whoever is responsible for this database about how or why they started it and how much effort it is to keep track of this information. Here is a page for people to submit information to help improve the quality of the database.
    So violent crime in general is going down while police killings are going up. And right wing nutjobs on the radio think we the people should be thankful for this?
    9/11 Thermate experiments

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  6. #5
    RIP the more than 1000!

    Rot in hell costumed murders!

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jmdrake View Post
    So violent crime in general is going down while police killings are going up. And right wing nutjobs on the radio think we the people should be thankful for this?
    Yup. You're also supposed to be grateful for the murders of whatever brown people are the Enemy Of The Week. Because shut the $#@! up, mundane, that's why.
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  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Schifference View Post
    How many indictments where issued to policeman for wrongdoing associated with the deaths?
    I'd wager the total number is 3-5, but that may be an overestimate.

  9. #8
    EXCLUSIVE: In 179 fatalities involving on-duty NYPD cops in 15 years, only 3 cases led to indictments — and just 1 conviction

    A Staten Island grand jury’s decision not to indict white NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for the chokehold death of Eric Garner — a black father of six — stunned large swaths of the city and added fuel to a nationwide surge of protests over police killings.

    But history shows the odds were always in Pantaleo’s favor.

    A Daily News investigation found that at least 179 people were killed by on-duty NYPD officers over the past 15 years. Just three of the deaths have led to an indictment in state court. In another case, a judge threw out the indictment on technical grounds and it was not reinstated.

    Only one officer who killed someone while on duty has been convicted, but he was not sentenced to jail time.

    The analysis of the police-involved deaths begins with the 1999 slaying of unarmed Amadou Diallo in a hail of bullets and ends with last month’s shooting death of Akai Gurley, who police say was hit by a ricocheting bullet fired by a rookie cop in a darkened housing project stairwell in Brooklyn. Gurley was also unarmed.

    The News found that since 1999:

    Roughly 27% of people killed by cops were unarmed.

    Where race was known, 86% were black or Hispanic.

    Twenty-one people were killed — three of them by off-duty cops — in 2012, the highest during the 15-year span.

    Former NYPD Officer Bryan Conroy was convicted in 2005 of criminally negligent homicide for gunning down West African immigrant Ousmane Zongo, 43, during a counterfeit goods raid at a Chelsea warehouse two years earlier.
    hxxp://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc-crime/179-nypd-involved-deaths-3-indicted-exclusive-article-1.2037357

    Much more at the link.
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  11. #9
    whew, what a relief. I thought it would be more than that...

    all this new training is paying off.

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by heavenlyboy34 View Post
    Yup. You're also supposed to be grateful for the murders of whatever brown people are the Enemy Of The Week. Because shut the $#@! up, mundane, that's why.
    There are actually more whites killed by police annually than blacks or latinos. Strange but true.

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by DFF View Post
    There are actually more whites killed by police annually than blacks or latinos. Strange but true.
    does that make you mad?

  14. #12
    The FBI’s statistics for 2013 say that law enforcement officers killed 461 people that year. Killedbypolice.net apparently got its start last year. Using their system of monitoring by news report, they have calculated that police actually killed 748 people between May and December. That’s 287 more than the FBI reports for the whole year.
    Well then its clear the FBI just needs to get moar funding.

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  15. #13
    Oh crap, I found that article on the web and bookmarked it, I was going to post it on Limequat's thread > http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...merica-Help-Us Forgot all about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRey View Post
    Do you think it's a coincidence that the most cherished standard of the Ron Paul campaign was a sign highlighting the word "love" inside the word "revolution"? A revolution not based on love is a revolution doomed to failure. So, at the risk of sounding corny, I just wanted to let you know that, wherever you stand on any of these hot-button issues, and even if we might have exchanged bitter words or harsh sentiments in the past, I love each and every one of you - no exceptions!

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  16. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by JK/SEA View Post
    does that make you mad?
    Of course it upsets me, but I posted that more for the purpose of pointing out that it's not just blacks and sometimes latinos being killed.

    Which kinda blows that whole racism is the motive argument out of the water.
    Last edited by DFF; 12-19-2014 at 10:32 PM.

  17. #15
    Limequat is one heck of an activist. Cheers to him.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRey View Post
    Do you think it's a coincidence that the most cherished standard of the Ron Paul campaign was a sign highlighting the word "love" inside the word "revolution"? A revolution not based on love is a revolution doomed to failure. So, at the risk of sounding corny, I just wanted to let you know that, wherever you stand on any of these hot-button issues, and even if we might have exchanged bitter words or harsh sentiments in the past, I love each and every one of you - no exceptions!

    "When goods do not cross borders, soldiers will." Frederic Bastiat

    Peace.

  18. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by JK/SEA View Post
    does that make you mad?
    Makes me mad, regardless of who they are.



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  20. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by DFF View Post
    Of course it upsets me, but I posted that more for the purpose of pointing out that it's not just blacks and sometimes latinos being killed.

    Which kinda blows that whole racism is the motive argument out of the water.
    maybe re-wording your comment so it doesn't sound like that 'we' need to start killing more blacks to 'even out' the stats might be in order.

  21. #18
    So, 1 thousand out of 316 million?

    While regrettable, you probably shouldn't use that statistic to advance your cause.

    How many of those are suicide by cop or darwin by cop? Subtract those from your total.

    You are more likely to die from an infected toenail...

  22. #19
    Don't forget, we still have a "Christmas jackpot" coming up where police will likely encounter a lot of partiers and pull over a lot of holiday shopping drivers that will likely make those numbers increase significantly.
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  23. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by kcchiefs6465 View Post
    hxxp://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc-crime/179-nypd-involved-deaths-3-indicted-exclusive-article-1.2037357

    Much more at the link.
    Am I mistaken, or does that say only 21 people were killed by cops in 2012, and that this was the highest number in 15 years? If so, then HOLY $#@!!!!
    Last edited by PaulConventionWV; 12-20-2014 at 12:16 PM.
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  24. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by DFF View Post
    Of course it upsets me, but I posted that more for the purpose of pointing out that it's not just blacks and sometimes latinos being killed.

    Which kinda blows that whole racism is the motive argument out of the water.
    Got sources?
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  25. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by PaulConventionWV View Post
    Am I mistaken, or does that say only 21 people were killed by cops in 2012, and that this was the highest number in 15 years? If so, then HOLY $#@!!!!
    NYPD cops.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRey View Post
    Do you think it's a coincidence that the most cherished standard of the Ron Paul campaign was a sign highlighting the word "love" inside the word "revolution"? A revolution not based on love is a revolution doomed to failure. So, at the risk of sounding corny, I just wanted to let you know that, wherever you stand on any of these hot-button issues, and even if we might have exchanged bitter words or harsh sentiments in the past, I love each and every one of you - no exceptions!

    "When goods do not cross borders, soldiers will." Frederic Bastiat

    Peace.

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Rogue View Post
    NYPD cops.
    Ah, ok. Do we have the same stats for 2013 and 2014?

    Yep, just found them. Thanks.
    Last edited by PaulConventionWV; 12-20-2014 at 12:29 PM.
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  27. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by PaulConventionWV View Post
    Ah, ok. Do we have the same stats for 2013 and 2014?

    Yep, just found them. Thanks.
    I'm not sure, I tried to read that article, but my browser keeps kicking me out of it.
    I hope this is a working link. >http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.2037357

    Addendum

    From article.
    The News’ analysis was based on information compiled by organizations such as the Prison Reform Organizing Project and the Stolen Lives Project, the NYPD’s annual firearms discharge reports, press reports, and court documents. The News only included deaths that involved an active member of the force and were a direct result of the officer’s actions. So, cases where individuals died from swallowing drugs during an arrest or hitting a tree during a car chase, for example, were not included.

    The News found 222 deaths total during the 15-year span — 43 of which involved off-duty officers, some of whom bravely stepped in when they saw trouble, others who were embroiled in personal disputes or driving drunk. The News
    was only able to identify 10 convictions covering 14 of those off-duty deaths, and one case that is ongoing.
    Editor's note: The News added that the 80 officers killed in the line of duty over the past 15 years, a figure provided by the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, include those who died of illnesses related to their work after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.
    Last edited by Henry Rogue; 12-20-2014 at 12:45 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRey View Post
    Do you think it's a coincidence that the most cherished standard of the Ron Paul campaign was a sign highlighting the word "love" inside the word "revolution"? A revolution not based on love is a revolution doomed to failure. So, at the risk of sounding corny, I just wanted to let you know that, wherever you stand on any of these hot-button issues, and even if we might have exchanged bitter words or harsh sentiments in the past, I love each and every one of you - no exceptions!

    "When goods do not cross borders, soldiers will." Frederic Bastiat

    Peace.



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  29. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by thoughtomator View Post
    I'd wager the total number is 3-5, but that may be an overestimate.
    That one officer in the Denver area who followed the guy into his house and shot him in the back has been charged with murder -- I'll bet he's the only killer cop to have been charged with that in the past year.

  30. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by 69360 View Post
    So, 1 thousand out of 316 million?

    While regrettable, you probably shouldn't use that statistic to advance your cause.

    How many of those are suicide by cop or darwin by cop? Subtract those from your total.

    You are more likely to die from an infected toenail...
    The number may be small, but that doesn't matter, not ONE person should be wrongfully killed by a cop with no accountability for the police (90+% of the time).

  31. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Rogue View Post
    I'm not sure, I tried to read that article, but my browser keeps kicking me out of it.
    I hope this is a working link. >http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.2037357

    Addendum

    From article.
    EXCLUSIVE: In 179 fatalities involving on-duty NYPD cops in 15 years, only 3 cases led to indictments — and just 1 conviction

    A Staten Island grand jury’s decision not to indict white NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for the chokehold death of Eric Garner — a black father of six — stunned large swaths of the city and added fuel to a nationwide surge of protests over police killings.

    But history shows the odds were always in Pantaleo’s favor.

    A Daily News investigation found that at least 179 people were killed by on-duty NYPD officers over the past 15 years. Just three of the deaths have led to an indictment in state court. In another case, a judge threw out the indictment on technical grounds and it was not reinstated.

    Only one officer who killed someone while on duty has been convicted, but he was not sentenced to jail time.

    The analysis of the police-involved deaths begins with the 1999 slaying of unarmed Amadou Diallo in a hail of bullets and ends with last month’s shooting death of Akai Gurley, who police say was hit by a ricocheting bullet fired by a rookie cop in a darkened housing project stairwell in Brooklyn. Gurley was also unarmed.

    The News found that since 1999:

    Roughly 27% of people killed by cops were unarmed.
    Where race was known, 86% were black or Hispanic.
    Twenty-one people were killed — three of them by off-duty cops — in 2012, the highest during the 15-year span.

    Former NYPD Officer Bryan Conroy was convicted in 2005 of criminally negligent homicide for gunning down West African immigrant Ousmane Zongo, 43, during a counterfeit goods raid at a Chelsea warehouse two years earlier

    Zongo — a married father of two who was never implicated in the counterfeit goods investigation — worked at the warehouse and happened upon Conroy, who was disguised as a postal worker when he drew his weapon. Conroy shot Zongo four times.

    Conroy’s first trial ended in a hung jury. A judge convicted him in a second trial and sentenced him to five years of probation and 500 hours of community service.

    “In most of those cases it would be the local district attorney who’s bringing up the charges, if any,” said Robert Gangi, executive director of the Prison Reform Organizing Project.

    “There’s an inherent conflict of interest. . . . The police and DA work very closely together, and so they need each other to carry out their jobs,” said Gangi, adding he’s encouraged by the mainstream political support from Gov. Cuomo to state Assembly members to create a special prosecutor who would handle police-involved deaths.

    The News’ analysis was based on information compiled by organizations such as the Prison Reform Organizing Project and the Stolen Lives Project, the NYPD’s annual firearms discharge reports, press reports, and court documents. The News only included deaths that involved an active member of the force and were a direct result of the officer’s actions. So, cases where individuals died from swallowing drugs during an arrest or hitting a tree during a car chase, for example, were not included.

    The News found 222 deaths total during the 15-year span — 43 of which involved off-duty officers, some of whom bravely stepped in when they saw trouble, others who were embroiled in personal disputes or driving drunk. The News was only able to identify 10 convictions covering 14 of those off-duty deaths, and one case that is ongoing.

    Patrick Lynch, head of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, pointed out that during the same time period, nearly 80 officers have been killed in the line of duty, a number that includes cops who heroically died in the Sept. 11 terrorist attack and from related health complications.

    “When there is a life-or-death situation on the street, be it an armed robbery, a homicidal maniac on the street or someone driving a vehicle in a dangerous and potentially deadly way, it is New York City police officers who step in and take the risk away from the public and put it on themselves,” Lynch said in a statement. “Our work has saved tens of thousands of lives by assuming the risk and standing between New Yorkers and life-threatening danger.”

    The NYPD declined to comment for this article or provide its own internal statistics on officer-involved deaths, and the information has not been submitted to the FBI since 2006.

    Commissioner Bill Bratton defended his department in a recent interview on “Good Day New York,” saying, “We have some of the lowest number of incidents of taking lives in this country.”

    Some of the deaths reviewed by The News involved fierce firefights and death-defying heroism by New York’s Finest — like when off-duty Officer Ivan Marcano, on a night out with his girlfriend, took down an armed robber as he clutched his own gunshot wound to the chest. Marcano was later honored by President Obama.

    Officer Richard Burt gunned down assassin Othneil Askew in 2003 after Askew murdered Councilman James Davis in City Hall. Four rookie cops took down hatchet-wielding madman Zale Thompson in Jamaica, Queens, in October.

    But in more than a quarter of the on-duty fatalities the victim was unarmed — some were cases of mistaken identity or innocent bystanders. Others like Garner were implicated in low-level crimes (he was accused of selling untaxed cigarettes).

    And roughly 20% involved people who were emotionally disturbed, such as Iman Morales, who in 2008 was found naked and waving a fluorescent bulb on the second-floor ledge of a building on Tompkins Ave. in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Cops tried to subdue him with a Taser, and Morales fell headfirst onto the concrete below and died.

    Lt. Michael Pigott, who ordered the use of the Taser, took his own life eight days later.

    “I have never in 30 years met any police officers who, as he drove into work, said, ‘Today I am going to get into a shooting, kill someone, become a headline and lose my job and my pension,’ ” said Ed Mullins, the president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association.

    Mullins said many people don’t realize the lifetime impact a death has on officers.

    “Their personality changes. . . . They become quiet. They go about their business, but they’re not the same people they used to be.”

    Diallo, an African immigrant, was standing in the vestibule of his Bronx apartment building when four white anti-crime cops mistook him for a rape suspect. They ordered him to show his hands; Diallo tried to show them his wallet. The officers mistook it for a gun, and 41 bullets later, the 22-year-old was dead.

    The officers were acquitted of murder charges a year later — setting off a sea of protests, new police training procedures and numerous studies of how racial bias influences snap decisions on whether to shoot.

    But the number of on-duty police killings has not gone down. The News tallied 11 in 1999, the year Diallo was killed, and 12 this year. In 2012, there were 18, the highest during the 15-year span.

    “There’s a lot of frustration,” said lawyer Norman Siegel, a longtime advocate of reforming the grand jury system.

    The Garner case was a rare instance in which video clearly showed the chain of events leading up to a death. Garner protested what he perceived as harassment, saying, “I can’t breathe” 11 times as he was put into a chokehold and piled on by several officers.

    The shocking video of the chokehold that led to Garner’s death on July 17 in Tompkinsville, S.I., was first published by NYDailyNews.com.

    The medical examiner’s office ruled his death a homicide caused by the chokehold. Obesity was a contributing factor in the 43-year-old man’s death, the medical examiner found.

    There have been other cases where unarmed civilians died after being choked or having their chests compressed by officers where there were no such videos — and no public outrage and no grand jury hearings.

    James Young, a 49-year-old father of three, fell into a coma and later died after he was choked by a narcotics detective “for an extended period of time” until he started foaming at the mouth and lost consciousness, a lawsuit claims. The Brooklyn district attorney declined to prosecute the case, and the civil lawsuit was settled for $832,500 in June.

    Siegel, who represented Young’s widow, said the Garner case demonstrates that even a damning video does not guarantee accountability.

    “A video might have been helpful in James Young’s case, but the real problem is still the secret grand jury process and the lack of a special prosecutor,” Siegel said.

    A mentally ill woman, Shereese Francis, 29, of Queens, died of heart failure in 2012 after being suffocated by four male officers who were called to get her in an ambulance because she hadn’t been taking her meds, another lawsuit claims.

    After a 14-month investigation that included several home visits and interviews with family members who were present on the day of the death, the Queens DA declined to prosecute, according to court records. The family was awarded $1.1 million in a civil lawsuit in May.

    The family’s lawyer said her death was ruled a homicide due to compression of the chest. She, like Garner, was obese, and the cops applied a chokehold on her for a short time as well, lawyer Steve Vaccarro said.

    New York prosecutors, like their counterparts across the nation, have had difficulties scoring indictments against cops.

    In Manhattan — where The News found 41 deaths involving on-duty cops since 1999 — the prosecutor who got the conviction in the Zongo case, former Manhattan DA Robert Morgenthau, had a policy to present all cases involving fatal shootings by cops to a grand jury. It’s a policy that’s being continued by his successor, Cyrus Vance Jr.

    “I wanted people to have confidence in the integrity of law enforcement and the criminal justice system,” Morgenthau told The News. “If I would pick and choose the cases, people would lack confidence in the objectivity of the prosecutor.”

    Some controversial cases in Brooklyn — where The News found 75 deaths involving on-duty officers — never made it to a grand jury, despite promises from former District Attorney Charles Hynes that they were under active investigation. Instead, those cases withered on the vine, preventing police from proceeding with departmental investigations and the victims’ families from proceeding with civil cases.

    “I’m very upset my son’s case never reached a grand jury,” said Laverne Dobbinson, whose son Tamon Robinson was fatally struck by an NYPD cruiser in April 2012 as cops chased him for stealing rocks from the grounds of a housing project in Canarsie, Brooklyn.

    “It was just swept under the rug,” she said.

    A probe into the July 11, 2009, death of Army veteran Shem Walker dragged on for more than four years, as Hynes said he was weighing how to proceed.

    Walker, a married 49-year-old Army vet, got into a scuffle with an undercover officer he’d tried to move from the stoop of his grandmother’s building in Fort Greene. Walker didn’t know the man was a cop observing a buy-and-bust operation nearby, and the altercation got physical. Police said Walker punched the undercover, then the undercover shot Walker three times.

    It was Hynes’ successor, Kenneth Thompson, who finally decided not to submit the case to a grand jury earlier this year.

    “There was absolutely no reason that I can fathom for keeping these cases open for so long,” said the Walker family’s lawyer, Scott Rynecki. “The fact that prior DA Hynes sat on these cases for so long left no choice for the new DA because so much time had passed. The families are entitled to closure.”

    Hynes declined to comment.

    Bronx DA Robert Johnson managed to score a manslaughter indictment against Officer Richard Haste for the shooting death of Ramarley Graham in 2012.

    Haste said he’d followed Graham into his E. 229th St. home as part of a drug investigation, and opened fire on the 18-year-old when the teen reached for his waistband. No weapon was found.

    But Johnson’s victory was short-lived. A judge tossed the indictment, finding prosecutors made a mistake in their presentation. He presented the case to a grand jury again, and said he was “surprised and shocked” when the grand jury voted not to indict.

    Queens District Attorney Richard Brown prosecuted three officers for manslaughter and reckless endangerment for the 2006 killing of Sean Bell — another death that sparked nationwide protests. Bell was leaving his bachelor party at a Jamaica strip club with two friends when cops unleashed a fusillade of 50 bullets at their gray Nissan Altima.

    The feds are investigating the Graham and Garner cases for possible civil rights violations. But Siegel noted it’s been two decades since the feds last prosecuted a fatal police case in New York.

    Anthony Baez, 29, was tossing a football around with his brothers in the Bronx when the ball hit a squad car in 1994. Officer Frank Livoti became enraged and squeezed the life out of Baez with a chokehold. A Bronx grand jury indicted him and he was acquitted by a judge of criminally negligent homicide.

    Livoti was convicted in 1998 of federal civil rights violations and served nearly seven years in prison.

    Siegel said the Garner case would be more difficult for the feds because Garner was a criminal suspect, albeit a very low-level one.

    As for the shooting death of Gurley, who was laid to rest Saturday, sources told The News that Thompson will empanel a grand jury by the end of the month to consider possible charges against rookie cop Peter Liang.

    Several state and local politicians, meanwhile, have called for a special prosecutor to handle all cases where people have been killed by police, believing local district attorneys can’t pursue them objectively because they work so closely with cops.

    Editor's note: The News added that the 80 officers killed in the line of duty over the past 15 years, a figure provided by the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, include those who died of illnesses related to their work after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.
    hxxp://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc-crime/179-nypd-involved-deaths-3-indicted-exclusive-article-1.2037357

    Graphic at the website.

    WRITTEN BY SARAH RYLEY , NOLAN HICKS , THOMAS TRACY , JOHN MARZULLI , DAREH GREGORIAN (I, of course, having had nothing to do with the article)
    “The nationalist not only does not disapprove of atrocities committed by his own side, but he has a remarkable capacity for not even hearing about them.” --George Orwell

    Quote Originally Posted by AuH20 View Post
    In terms of a full spectrum candidate, Rand is leaps and bounds above Trump. I'm not disputing that.
    Who else in public life has called for a pre-emptive strike on North Korea?--Donald Trump

  32. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by 69360 View Post
    So, 1 thousand out of 316 million?

    While regrettable, you probably shouldn't use that statistic to advance your cause.

    How many of those are suicide by cop or darwin by cop? Subtract those from your total.

    You are more likely to die from an infected toenail...
    Very true, and you are ten times more likely to be killed by cop than a terrorist.

    That didn't stop Theme from turning our nation inside out and into a prison state in the name of "fightin' terruh"

    So, tell me, to your mind, what is an unacceptable number?

    10,000?

    100,000

    1,000,000

    How high should it go before you get upset enough to do something? To admit that there is a deadly serious problem afoot?

    Look, there are already more people in prison in the US than any other place in the world.

    80,000 plus SWAT raids every year and climbing.

    A dead dog killed by cops every 98 minutes.

    Billions every year in "asset forfeitures".

    So even if it is nothing more than writing SWLODs and raising hell at local police commission meetings, what's your level of "high piss off"?

    Of "this, and no more"?

  33. #29

  34. #30
    The statistic about 1000 police deaths is troubling, however, the thing I find most egregious about the police class and others in law enforcement is that they routinely enforce unjust/unconstitutional/immoral laws. Their guns are the glue to the tyrannical system. Without them, we would be living a free and undisturbed lives:

    Taxes are routinely paid because people don't want to see a swat team and jail time.
    Our second amendment has been put into a paper shredder by cops enforcement of unconstitutional gun laws.
    Drug violence galore and all the wonderful Easter eggs that come from a black market occur because they enforce immoral drug laws.

    Cops have a choice. No one forces them to do their job. Unfortunately for us, they choose to side with the tyrannical government instead of the people.

    If there really are moral police out there this is the question I would ask them: Have you ever enforced an immoral/unconstitutional law? My guess is that 99.99999% of them would answer yes to this question. That is the problem.

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