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Thread: Rand Paul: The Founding Fathers Would Have Protected Your Smartphone

  1. #1

    Rand Paul: The Founding Fathers Would Have Protected Your Smartphone

    The Founding Fathers Would Have Protected Your Smartphone

    By SEN. RAND PAUL and SEN. CHRIS COONS

    May 27, 2014

    Privacy is a core American value. For 235 years, the Fourth Amendment has protected us from unwarranted searches of our personal belongings. All the while, technology has been changing where and how we keep those belongings. On April 29, the Supreme Court held oral arguments in two cases, Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie. At question is whether the police can search the contents of a phone without a warrant during an arrest. At stake is whether technological advancements have rendered one of our most treasured civil liberties obsolete.

    Today, many Americans keep their entire lives on their phones: family photos, emails, calendar appointments, Internet searches and even location history. Considered separately, each of these categories can reveal very private information. Taken together, they can present a pretty good picture of who you are, what you do, where you go, what you read and what you write. What protection does the Constitution offer them from suspicionless search by the government?

    The Fourth Amendment grants to the people the right to be “secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” It did not find its way into the Constitution by accident. It was, rather, a specific response to a principal grievance of colonial Americans under British rule — namely, the use of the “general warrant” whereby the crown gave officials almost unfettered authority to search colonial homes, rifle through papers and scour personal belongings.
    Read more:

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/sto...9.html?hp=pm_2
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    H. L. Mencken said it best:


    “Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard.”


    "As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."



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  3. #2
    It was, rather, a specific response to a principal grievance of colonial Americans under British rule — namely, the use of the “general warrant” whereby the crown gave officials almost unfettered authority to search colonial homes, rifle through papers and scour personal belongings.
    In no way is the situation today, any better than what it was then.

    In fact, it is worse.

    For all intents and purposes, cops already have a "general warrant".

    And even King George would not have had the stones to randomly stop colonial citizens and bleed them.

    We are in a much worse position, liberty wise, than we were in 1770 Boston.

    And the people love it, cheer for it and want more.

  4. #3
    It was, rather, a specific response to a principal grievance of colonial Americans under British rule — namely, the use of the “general warrant” whereby the crown gave officials almost unfettered authority to search colonial homes, rifle through papers and scour personal belongings.
    In no way is the situation today, any better than what it was then.

    In fact, it is worse.

    For all intents and purposes, cops already have a "general warrant".

    And even King George would not have had the stones to randomly stop colonial citizens and bleed them.

    We are in a much worse position, liberty wise, than we were in 1770 Boston.

    And the people love it, cheer for it and want more.

  5. #4
    It was, rather, a specific response to a principal grievance of colonial Americans under British rule — namely, the use of the “general warrant” whereby the crown gave officials almost unfettered authority to search colonial homes, rifle through papers and scour personal belongings.
    In no way is the situation today, any better than what it was then.

    In fact, it is worse.

    For all intents and purposes, cops already have a "general warrant".

    And even King George would not have had the stones to randomly stop colonial citizens and bleed them.

    We are in a much worse position, liberty wise, than we were in 1770 Boston.

    And the people love it, cheer for it and want more.
    Today I decided to get banned and spam activism on this forum...

    SUPPORT RANDPAULDIGITAL GRASSROOTS PROJECTS TODAY!

    http://i.imgur.com/SORJlQ5.png

    For more info. or to help spread the word, go to the promotion thread here.



    Quote Originally Posted by orenbus View Post
    If I had to answer this question truthfully I'd probably piss a lot of people off lol, Barrex would be a better person to ask he doesn't seem to care lol.




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