Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: How would Martin Luther King Jr. react to NSA spying today?

  1. #1

    Default How would Martin Luther King Jr. react to NSA spying today?

    With the coverage of the March, I have to wonder what MLK would have to say about NSA spying. He was a Republican, you know.



    I don't see many MLK meme pics with conservative messages.
    "Let it not be said that we did nothing." - Ron Paul

    Internet shills exposed: (Yes, there are plenty on RPF)
    http://the-tap.blogspot.com/2012/10/...eyre-real.html

    Why most RPF members are against the US involvement with Israel explained by Mini-Me:
    http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?t=218093
    No anti-semitism, just logic.

    Visiting the Outer Banks of NC?
    Outer Banks Fishing Boat Rentals



  2. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  3. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by devil21 View Post
    He was a Republican, you know...

    How so?

    To the question, don't know, but Malcolm X certainly would condemn it.
    Last edited by robert68; 08-26-2013 at 02:39 AM.

  4. #3

    Default

    Would he say?

    "I have a dream that one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers and declare that none of us want to be spied on by the government, regardless of the color of our skin."

    Something like that?
    "Let it not be said that we did nothing." - Ron Paul

    Internet shills exposed: (Yes, there are plenty on RPF)
    http://the-tap.blogspot.com/2012/10/...eyre-real.html

    Why most RPF members are against the US involvement with Israel explained by Mini-Me:
    http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?t=218093
    No anti-semitism, just logic.

    Visiting the Outer Banks of NC?
    Outer Banks Fishing Boat Rentals

  5. #4

    Default

    Id be more curious about what hed think about tratvon martin.

  6. #5

    Default

    The depressing thing is that no matter what he said, he'd likely not be taken very seriously. In being murdered he became a martyr, and what he did and said became far more important than if he was still alive. I'd bet Sharpton would dismiss him an a washed out crank.

  7. #6

    Default

    MLK and Malcolm X would both condemn it, but then MSM (the so called 'conservative' side) would spin their comments as race baiting. The people would be distracted by race then...end of story.
    Follow me on Twitter @
    http://twitter.com/#!/G_fasciatus



    Liberty PAC Donation link --> http://paracom.paramountcommunicatio...F6506272F00C:r

    Originally Posted by phill4paul
    There should be mass firings, not resignation, and criminal prosecutions. If Ron Paul had been president could you imagine the house sweep he could have done with these revelations?

  8. #7
    Member donnay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Live Free or Die Trying!
    Posts
    20,892
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    "I had a nightmare..."
    *Legal Disclaimer: While I am a keen researcher and want nothing more than to help people, I am not a doctor and more importantly, I am not your doctor. Any article I post that contains general information about medical conditions, treatments and remedies is to bring awareness. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. You should never delay seeking medical advice, or discontinue any medical treatment because of information in an article I have posted. The only advice I would give is to continue to research further and use discernment with all advice.

  9. #8

    Default

    He would have fewer meetings inside, and more in the open air.

    Quote Originally Posted by devil21 View Post
    He was a Republican, you know.

    I don't see many MLK meme pics with conservative messages.
    Quote Originally Posted by robert68 View Post
    How so?
    For most of the first hundred years since the Civil War, most blacks were Republicans. The Democratic Party started the Civil War, the Democratic Party was the party of the southern states, and few southern whites wanted to vote for the party of Lincoln. What's more, yellow dog Democrats were more 'conservative' (as the term is misused today) than any Republicans back then.
    Quote Originally Posted by Maury Klein View Post
    Since the pace of change wrought by new technology continues to gain speed, the gap between policy and reality widens daily... In the modern world policy cannot possibly keep pace with change of all kinds.
    Quote Originally Posted by Calvin Coolidge View Post
    There is danger of disappointment and disaster unless there be a wider comprehension of the limitations of the law. The attempt to regulate, control, and prescribe all manner of conduct and social relations is very old. It was always the practice of primitive peoples.

  10. #9

    Default

    Considering he was spied on by the FBI, he might take this rather seriously...

  11. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post

    For most of the first hundred years since the Civil War, most blacks were Republicans. The Democratic Party started the Civil War, the Democratic Party was the party of the southern states, and few southern whites wanted to vote for the party of Lincoln. What's more, yellow dog Democrats were more 'conservative' (as the term is misused today) than any Republicans back then.
    None of that means he was a Republican. The Democrat Party had changed a lot by the time of MLK's political adulthood. JFK and LBJ's support of new civil rights laws was significant in that regard.
    Last edited by robert68; 08-26-2013 at 11:41 AM.

  12. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by devil21 View Post
    With the coverage of the March, I have to wonder what MLK would have to say about NSA spying. He was a Republican, you know.

    I don't see many MLK meme pics with conservative messages.
    Probably because he was at the very least, a communist-sympathizer.
    I have many friends in the libertarian movement who look down on those of us who get involved in political activity,
    he acknowledged, but "eventually, if you want to bring about changes what you have to do is participate in political
    action.
    -- Ron Paul


    "We do have some differences and our approaches will be different, but that makes him his own person. I mean why should he [Rand] be a clone and do everything and think just exactly as I have. I think it's an opportunity to be independent minded. We are about 99% the same on issues." "People Try To Drive Wedges Between Rand And Me." --Ron Paul

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=pB5JgzBVHN0

    The Property Basis of Rights

  13. #12
    Needs a bigger boat Anti Federalist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    In a Nine Line Bind
    Posts
    55,906
    Blog Entries
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    "I had a nightmare..."
    Wins thread.

  14. #13

    Default

    http://www.aavw.org/special_features...ch_king02.html

    He actually did say something on it:
    A fifth casualty of the war in Vietnam is the principle of dissent. An ugly repressive sentiment to silence peace seekers depicts advocates of immediate negotiation and persons who call for a cessation of bombings in the north as quasi-traitors, fools and venal enemies of our soldiers and institutions. When those who stand for peace are so vilified it is time to consider where we are going and whether free speech has not become one of the major casualties of the war.

    Curtailment of free speech is rationalized on grounds that American tradition forbids criticism of our government when the nation is at war. More than a century ago when we were in a declared state of war with Mexico, a first term Congressman by the name of Abraham Lincoln stood in the halls of Congress and fearlessly and scathingly denounced that war. Abraham Lincoln of Illinois had not heard of this tradition or he was not inclined to respect it. Nor had Thoreau and Emerson and many other philosophers who shaped our democratic traditions.

    Also applicable to Syria:
    The second casualty of the war in Vietnam is the principle of self-determination. By entering a war that is little more than a domestic civil war, America has ended up supporting a new form of colonialism covered up by certain niceties of complexity. Whether we realize it or not our participation in the war in Vietnam is an ominous expression of our lack of sympathy for the oppressed, our paranoid anti-Communism, our failure to feel the ache and anguish of the Have Nots. It reveals our willingness to continue participating in neo-colonialist adventures.

    A brief look at the back ground and history of this war reveals with brutal clarity the ugliness of our policy. The Vietnamese people proclaimed their own independence in 1945 after a combined French and Japanese occupation, and before the Communist revolution in China. They were led by the now well known Ho Chi Minh. Even though they quoted the American Declaration of Independence in their own document of freedom, we refused to recognize them. Instead, we decided to support France in its reconquest of her former colony. With that tragic decision we rejected a revolutionary government seeking self-determination, and a government that had been established not by China, for whom the Vietnamese have no great love, but by clearly indigenous forces that included some Communists.

    For nine years following 1945 we denied the people of Vietnam the right to independence. For nine years we financially supported the French in their abortive effort to re-colonize Vietnam. Before the end of the war we were meeting 80% of the French war costs. Even before the French were defeated at Dien Bien Phu, they began to despair of their reckless action, but we did not. We encouraged them with our huge financial and military supplies to continue the war even after they had lost the will.

    When a negotiated settlement of the war was reached in 1954, through the Geneva Accord, it was done against our will. After doing all that we could to sabotage the planning for the Geneva Accord, we finally refused to sign it.

    Soon after this we helped install Ngo Dhim Diem. We supported him in his betrayal of the Geneva Accord and his refusal to have the promised 1956 elections. We watched with approval as he engaged in ruthless and bloody persecution of all opposition forces. When Diem's infamous actions finally led to the formation of The National Liberation Front, the American public was duped into believing that the civil rebellion was being waged by puppets from Hanoi. As Douglas Pike wrote: "In horror, Americans helplessly watched Diem tear apart the fabric of Vietnamese society more effectively than the Communists had ever been able to do it. It was the most efficient act of his entire career."

    Since Diem's death we have actively supported military dictatorships all in the name of fighting for freedom. When it became evident that these regimes could not defeat the Vietcong, we began to steadily increase our forces, calling them 'military advisors' rather than fighting soldiers.

    Today we are fighting an all-out war, undeclared by Congress. We have well over 500,000 American servicemen fighting in that benighted and unhappy country. American planes based in other countries are bombing the territory of their neighbor.

    The greatest irony and tragedy of all is that our nation, which initiated so much of the revolutionary spirit of the modern world, is now cast in the mold of being an arch anti-revolutionary. We are engaged in a war that seeks to turn the clock of history back and perpetuate white colonialism.
    Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder. ~GEORGE WASHINGTON, letter, Aug. 17, 1779

    Quit yer b*tching and whining and GET INVOLVED!!

  15. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Muskegon, MI
    Posts
    6,972

    Default

    Wonder what he would think of today's blacks.....

  16. #15

    Default

    Or more importantly, what would his main speechwriter, Stanley Levison, think...
    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!

    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of apportionment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  17. #16
    Member donnay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Live Free or Die Trying!
    Posts
    20,892
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danke View Post
    Or more importantly, what would his main speechwriter, Stanley Levison, think...
    "Oy Vey what a nightmare I had..."
    *Legal Disclaimer: While I am a keen researcher and want nothing more than to help people, I am not a doctor and more importantly, I am not your doctor. Any article I post that contains general information about medical conditions, treatments and remedies is to bring awareness. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. You should never delay seeking medical advice, or discontinue any medical treatment because of information in an article I have posted. The only advice I would give is to continue to research further and use discernment with all advice.





« Previous Thread | Next Thread »


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •