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Thread: stealth hoodie shields body heat from being seen by drones

  1. #1

    Default stealth hoodie shields body heat from being seen by drones

    http://news.discovery.com/tech/gear-...nes-130118.htm



    Surveillance cameras are ubiquitous, especially in the U.K.. and in the United States, Congress has already approved the use of drones for domestic surveillance. Then there’s the “Stingray” tool used by the FBI to track cell phones. It’s enough to make even those who’ve gotten nothing hide feel nervous.

    New York-based artist Adam Harvey doesn’t like it one bit. So he’s taken it upon himself to design anti-surveillance clothing to foil government snoopers.
    An Invisibility Cloak For Heat

    Harvey has been looking at the effects of such surveillance on culture for some time. Last year he designed a kind of face makeup called CVDazzle to avert face-recognition software.

    In the spirit of fooling cameras – and messing with surveillance – Harvey has now come out in a set of hoodies and scarves that block thermal radiation from the infrared scanners drones use. Wearing the fabric would make that part of the body look black to a drone, so the image would appear like disembodied legs. He also designed a pouch for cell phones that shields them from trackers by blocking the radio signals the phone emits. For those airport X-ray machines, he has a shirt with a printed design that blocks the radiation from one’s heart.
    Libyan Rebels Flying High With Minidrone

    The materials the clothes are made are specialized and expensive, so these aren’t the kinds of fashions that the local discount store will have – at least not yet. Harvey does plan to offer the clothes for sale, though.

    He sees the designs as a kind of conversation about surveillance in society at large. If we’re going to be watched all the time, shouldn’t we find a way to deal with that?

    If you want to see Harvey’s work, it will be at Primitive London starting Jan. 17.
    It was too weird to live, and too rare to die - hunter s. thompson .
    ..this is the darkest timeline..



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  3. #2

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    Interesting. If you're actually reflecting that radiation back inwards though, wouldn't you get pretty hot?
    "Truth will win in the end. We just don't know when the end is. So we have to persevere." ― Carol Paul


  4. #3

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    double post.
    Last edited by KCIndy; 01-18-2013 at 01:36 PM. Reason: dub dub dub dubble post!

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriate View Post
    Interesting. If you're actually reflecting that radiation back inwards though, wouldn't you get pretty hot?
    If he has made it with what I'm *guessing* he is using, the answer is yes. I'm guessing the jackets are simply lined with Mylar.

    I always keep a few Mylar "emergency blankets" with me when I travel. You can pick them up at any camping goods store, including Walmart. The blanket is just a big sheet of Mylar. It's very thin, but completely impermeable to wind and water, and reflects your body heat back at you with over 90% efficiency, if I remember right. Each "blanket" folds down to about the size of a pack of playing cards.

    Great stuff, Mylar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_blanket

    Wonder how it does against X-ray machines?

  6. #5
    Member shane77m's Avatar
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    Default Camo to hide from drones

    http://news.discovery.com/tech/gear-...nes-130118.htm



    Surveillance cameras are ubiquitous, especially in the U.K.. and in the United States, Congress has already approved the use of drones for domestic surveillance. Then there’s the “Stingray” tool used by the FBI to track cell phones. It’s enough to make even those who’ve gotten nothing hide feel nervous.

    New York-based artist Adam Harvey doesn’t like it one bit. So he’s taken it upon himself to design anti-surveillance clothing to foil government snoopers.
    An Invisibility Cloak For Heat

    Harvey has been looking at the effects of such surveillance on culture for some time. Last year he designed a kind of face makeup called CVDazzle to avert face-recognition software.

    In the spirit of fooling cameras – and messing with surveillance – Harvey has now come out in a set of hoodies and scarves that block thermal radiation from the infrared scanners drones use. Wearing the fabric would make that part of the body look black to a drone, so the image would appear like disembodied legs. He also designed a pouch for cell phones that shields them from trackers by blocking the radio signals the phone emits. For those airport X-ray machines, he has a shirt with a printed design that blocks the radiation from one’s heart.
    More at the link.

    Just when the government thinks they have the advantage someone comes along with something to help level the playing field.
    “First of all, if you’ve got health insurance, you like your doctors, you like your plan, you can keep your doctor, you can keep your plan. Nobody is talking about taking that away from you.” Lying Sack of Crap

  7. #6

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    Should I really be financing (taxes) a government that I have to hide from?

  8. #7

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    Predator Pun Intended

  9. #8

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by shane77m View Post
    http://news.discovery.com/tech/gear-...nes-130118.htm







    More at the link.

    Just when the government thinks they have the advantage someone comes along with something to help level the playing field.
    LOL Advantage? You know, when speaking about mentally deficient people, we should use the phrase "mentally challenged." When considering the government's advantages, we should use the word "retarded." Fortunately, as being retarded can lead to self destruction, it can become a positive when implemented against others.

    "Leave us alone or we will set our retarded government against you!"
    Last edited by Uncle Emanuel Watkins; 01-18-2013 at 07:08 PM.

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    Needs a bigger boat Anti Federalist's Avatar
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    Banned by federal law in 3...2...1...

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    Quote Originally Posted by KCIndy View Post
    If he has made it with what I'm *guessing* he is using, the answer is yes. I'm guessing the jackets are simply lined with Mylar.

    I always keep a few Mylar "emergency blankets" with me when I travel. You can pick them up at any camping goods store, including Walmart. The blanket is just a big sheet of Mylar. It's very thin, but completely impermeable to wind and water, and reflects your body heat back at you with over 90% efficiency, if I remember right. Each "blanket" folds down to about the size of a pack of playing cards.

    Great stuff, Mylar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_blanket

    Wonder how it does against X-ray machines?
    Seems your guess is correct. One of the citations for the Wiki article is a BBC video report describing how insurgents in Afghanistan use space blankets to move about undetected by the attack choppers.

    Here - it's mentioned 36 seconds into the video:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-16026965
    Last edited by Expatriate; 01-18-2013 at 11:28 PM. Reason: fixed URL
    "Truth will win in the end. We just don't know when the end is. So we have to persevere." ― Carol Paul


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    Garb and technology don't stop it from being an insane killing game... might as well be "Hunger Games".

    It's disgusting circus.

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    The materials the clothes are made are specialized and expensive....
    Aren't space blankets fairly inexpensive? Then again, sportwear companies charge alot for this technology.

    http://www.columbia.com/on/demandwar...eat_Reflective

    Maybe the fabric version requires more effort to manufacture.

    http://www.textileworld.com/Articles...ents/QFOM.html
    Last edited by dinosaur; 01-20-2013 at 04:50 PM.

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    This makes me feel better about the future.

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    Mylar may reflect 90% of of the radiant heat but you still have conductive and convective heat. Add copious amount of sweat and the conduction heat loss goes up. Then add radiating arms and legs pointing to the center of mass and a nice target is framed.....
    War; everything in the world wrong, evil and immoral combined into one and multiplied by millions.

  17. #16

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    This is great to see! This is the sort of countermeasure we should all be trying to develop and further refine -- not just with respect to thermal imaging, but in regards to other Big Brother technologies as well.

    I was planning on trying to develop something similar at some point using mylar and/or other materials, but it looks like this guy has beaten me to it. Maybe the idea can still be further refined, but I like the way Mr. Harvey thinks.

    Quote Originally Posted by klamath View Post
    Mylar may reflect 90% of of the radiant heat but you still have conductive and convective heat. Add copious amount of sweat and the conduction heat loss goes up. Then add radiating arms and legs pointing to the center of mass and a nice target is framed.....
    Thermal imagers only see radiated heat. Conduction and convection don't play any role unless you're in contact with (or too close to) a material that can be heated up and then detected by its own radiation. This "stealth clothing" shouldn't give off much radiation no matter how hot it gets, since (presumably) it's made from low-emissivity materials.

    Perhaps the best way to use a "stealth poncho" or something along those lines would be to only put it on when one needs to cross a relatively open space. When under dense foliage or other overhead cover, it could be left off.

    In any case, let's not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Simply having one's thermal signature "broken up" can be enough to prevent someone from looking at you twice, especially in a region with lots of dissimilar materials that tend to cause thermal "clutter" on an IR image.
    Last edited by GuerrillaXXI; 01-20-2013 at 06:19 PM.
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    "Generally speaking, the way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death." -- Miyamoto Musashi

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    Banned by federal law in 3...2...1...
    That's okay. We can just make our own, and then they won't have to know who has it and who doesn't. If the SHTF and this sort of IR camouflage becomes really important, then federal laws will be moot anyway.
    "Man lives freely only by his readiness to die." -- Mohandas K. Gandhi

    "Generally speaking, the way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death." -- Miyamoto Musashi

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    Member opal's Avatar
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    is it just me or does anyone else have the urge to go line the underside of their roof with Mylar? Shield the whole house.
    Disclaimer: any post made after midnight and before 8AM is made before the coffee dip stick has come up to optomim level - expect some level of silliness,

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  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuerrillaXXI View Post
    This is great to see! This is the sort of countermeasure we should all be trying to develop and further refine -- not just with respect to thermal imaging, but in regards to other Big Brother technologies as well.

    I was planning on trying to develop something similar at some point using mylar and/or other materials, but it looks like this guy has beaten me to it. Maybe the idea can still be further refined, but I like the way Mr. Harvey thinks.

    Thermal imagers only see radiated heat. Conduction and convection don't play any role unless you're in contact with (or too close to) a material that can be heated up and then detected by its own radiation. This "stealth clothing" shouldn't give off much radiation no matter how hot it gets, since (presumably) it's made from low-emissivity materials.
    Perhaps the best way to use a "stealth poncho" or something along those lines would be to only put it on when one needs to cross a relatively open space. When under dense foliage or other overhead cover, it could be left off.

    In any case, let's not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Simply having one's thermal signature "broken up" can be enough to prevent someone from looking at you twice, especially in a region with lots of dissimilar materials that tend to cause thermal "clutter" on an IR image.
    Conductive heated mylar will then be radiating IR. With close to a thousand flight hours using NVGs and FLIR I have a pretty good understanding of it.
    Last edited by klamath; 01-20-2013 at 08:10 PM.
    War; everything in the world wrong, evil and immoral combined into one and multiplied by millions.

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    Lone Coyote ClydeCoulter's Avatar
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    My polebarn workshop is wrapped all around including the roof with Foil-bubble-Foil insulation. It's 1/4" thick and provides 5+R insulation, and cell phones don't get a signal within it. I wonder if it is thermally shielded and to what degree (radiation wise). (It does reflect radiant heat).
    Last edited by ClydeCoulter; 01-20-2013 at 06:41 PM.

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    Member opal's Avatar
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    cool beans! got pics?? wrapped inside or outside? hubby's got a pole barn... needs to be insulated.. wonder if that stuff would make it too darn hot in the summer
    Disclaimer: any post made after midnight and before 8AM is made before the coffee dip stick has come up to optomim level - expect some level of silliness,

    The problems we face today exist because the people who work for a living are out numbered by those who vote for a living !!!!!!!

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    One article seems to think that the reason this is just a "hoodie" and not a full garment is because a full garment would be against International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

    If you want to make one yourself, this looks like a good place to start:

    http://www.fine-silver-productsnet.c...efayaandf.html

    It's around $5-10 per sq ft of fabric
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    une plume de Libertée GunnyFreedom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClydeCoulter View Post
    My polebarn workshop is wrapped all around including the roof with Foil-bubble-Foil insulation. It's 1/4" thick and provides 5+R insulation, and cell phones don't get a signal within it. I wonder if it is thermally shielded and to what degree (radiation wise). (It does reflect radiant heat).
    Well, depends on the IR you are trying to defeat, and what you mean by defeated. An expensive but just about certain way to defeat FLIR is with an ambient-temperature pane of glass held 8" in front of your heat source blocking the camera. Even as complicated as that is, that still may not be the type of IR defeat you are going for. perfect IR invisibility is difficult, but possible, but the closer you are to IR invisibility, the more difficult it will be to hide your visible light profile.

    If I'm honest, I tend to think the best way may be to go about the inside and outside and get the same color of thermal insulating and not thermal insulating paint, and just draw camouflage patters in thermal paint outside to match the landscape, inside to break up any shapes, and then cover in one-color so no-ones the wiser. if you have a heat source inside over a few watts, the barn will (eventually) glow no matter what. insulation and ventilation will decide how long that takes at what kind of power source. disrupt any 'glow' that forms into at best something natural looking.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by klamath View Post
    Conductive heated mylar will then be radiating IR.
    How much heat it radiates depends on its emissivity. This is why two objects can be at the same actual temperature but have very different brightnesses on a thermal image.

    I don't have the emissivity of mylar handy. But maybe there are other materials involved here, perhaps in multiple layers?

    With close to a thousand flight hours using NVGs and FLIR I have a pretty good understanding of it.
    No offense intended, but flying around looking at objects through NVG and FLIR does not equate to an understanding of the technology. Were you testing various materials for stealth purposes? If so, that's another matter, and I hope you'll share some ideas with everyone.
    "Man lives freely only by his readiness to die." -- Mohandas K. Gandhi

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    Lone Coyote ClydeCoulter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GunnyFreedom View Post
    Well, depends on the IR you are trying to defeat, and what you mean by defeated. An expensive but just about certain way to defeat FLIR is with an ambient-temperature pane of glass held 8" in front of your heat source blocking the camera. Even as complicated as that is, that still may not be the type of IR defeat you are going for. perfect IR invisibility is difficult, but possible, but the closer you are to IR invisibility, the more difficult it will be to hide your visible light profile.

    If I'm honest, I tend to think the best way may be to go about the inside and outside and get the same color of thermal insulating and not thermal insulating paint, and just draw camouflage patters in thermal paint outside to match the landscape, inside to break up any shapes, and then cover in one-color so no-ones the wiser. if you have a heat source inside over a few watts, the barn will (eventually) glow no matter what. insulation and ventilation will decide how long that takes at what kind of power source. disrupt any 'glow' that forms into at best something natural looking.
    I'm sure that at least one spot that glows like a neon sign, that's the woodstove in the winter on the northwest corner. But I like the thermal paint idea.

  27. #26

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    It looks like these thermal clothing items are already available for purchase:

    http://www.primitivelondon.co.uk/exh...tank-magazine/

    The downside is that they're pretty damned expensive. They're probably not worth it if a way can be discovered to improvise these things. Perhaps Mr. Harvey will be willing to share his methods.

    There are also a number of patents for "thermal camouflage" that can be read and downloaded from Google Patents. See for example US Patent #7,832,018.
    "Man lives freely only by his readiness to die." -- Mohandas K. Gandhi

    "Generally speaking, the way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death." -- Miyamoto Musashi

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    Lone Coyote ClydeCoulter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opal View Post
    cool beans! got pics?? wrapped inside or outside? hubby's got a pole barn... needs to be insulated.. wonder if that stuff would make it too darn hot in the summer
    It was wrapped during construction over the purlins and trusses, just prior to putting on the metal roof and siding.

    It helps keep it warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer. I also insulated with 1.5" foam sheets in the walls and R19 fiberglass in the ceiling. It's 1792 sq ft with 9' ceilings and a 5/12 pitch roof, and I am able to keep it 65 degrees F in the winter when it is in the teens outside using only a woodstove.
    Last edited by ClydeCoulter; 01-20-2013 at 10:26 PM.

  29. #28

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    Demonstration of the effect a space blanket has on FLIR:



    Other materials under FLIR:



    bbc clip: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-16026965

    mythbusters clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mV4ecEbV1s


    how to make a cheap ~$100 DIY thermal camera (only useful for taking still images, not video) http://www.cheap-thermocam.tk/
    "Truth will win in the end. We just don't know when the end is. So we have to persevere." ― Carol Paul


  30. #29

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    Anyone good with a needle and thread? Any DIY sewing machine pros out there?

    You can buy a 45"X10 yard bolt of "Insul-Fleece" for about seventy bucks. It's Mylar-lined fleece.

    Hmm. I could wrap my entire house for how much??

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by KCIndy View Post
    Anyone good with a needle and thread? Any DIY sewing machine pros out there?

    You can buy a 45"X10 yard bolt of "Insul-Fleece" for about seventy bucks. It's Mylar-lined fleece.

    Hmm. I could wrap my entire house for how much??
    If anyone is truly going to line their house with mylar, be sure to read up on the proper placement of vapor and air barriers within walls for your climate type. Placed improperly, a vapor barrier could lead to condensation within walls and mold problems.
    Last edited by dinosaur; 01-27-2013 at 08:07 AM.

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