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Thread: [VIDEO] The sheer size of our debt

  1. #1
    Member paulbot24's Avatar
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    Default [VIDEO] The sheer size of our debt

    Here is a great video showing the literal size of our debt based on $100 bills. I know you've probably seen pictures with the jumbo jet and such but this is actually very entertaining too.

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    Needs a comparison. Compared to America's net worth of more than $70 trillion, the national debt is really not a big deal.

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    Member sgt150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan View Post
    Needs a comparison. Compared to America's net worth of more than $70 trillion, the national debt is really not a big deal.
    What's the purpose of your comparison? What does that prove? That the government can steal some of their unpayable debts off? How are the liabilities paid off?
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  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan View Post
    Needs a comparison. Compared to America's net worth of more than $70 trillion, the national debt is really not a big deal.
    FLASHBACK TO MARCH 2009:

    The wealth of American families plunged nearly 18% in 2008, erasing years of sharp gains on housing and stocks and marking the biggest loss since the Federal Reserve began keeping track after World War II.

    The Fed said Thursday that U.S. households' net worth tumbled by $11 trillion -- a decline in a single year that equals the combined annual output of Germany, Japan and the U.K.
    ....
    In all, the net worth of U.S. households stood at $51.48 trillion at the end of 2008
    And now we're back up to more than 70 trillion! We should feel pretty good by now, because nominally The Economy-Wide Collective We are a full 28% better off than we were before the crash! (nominally, of course, adjusting for whatever and yada yada, details details)

    Fancy that, all that "wealth" destruction and recreation in just a few short years. Why, I'm feeling Quantitatively Eased already. That's like...what...magic?

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan View Post
    Needs a comparison. Compared to America's net worth of more than $70 trillion, the national debt is really not a big deal.
    \

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2012-1...h-648-trillion

    "The balance, or $53.6 trillion, comprising of deposits, corporates, mutual funds, pension funds and other assets, was all in one way or another tied into the stock market and the viability of the financial sector."

    I hope your post was satire. We should also consider how 16 trillion isn't close to what the real obligations are.

  7. #6

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    Stop calling it the national debt as if it's a loan that gets paid back.

    It represents the amount stolen via the delayed damage to the value of the dollar (inflation).
    It has enabled the war empire and has enslaved many to its false "free government love milk" teat as it slowly eats out all of the people's substance.

    "Debt" is too kind of a word. Call it "Slow Death".
    Last edited by FindLiberty; 12-07-2012 at 09:03 PM.





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