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Thread: Is it honorable to work for a law office overseeing evictions?

  1. #31

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    Consider the alternative. If there was no consequences for not paying rent or not paying mortgage, who would pay either of them? If there was no legal mechanism to deal with squatters then many landlord would resort to force. It would make drug violence look trivial in comparison.



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  3. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by thequietkid10 View Post
    Consider the alternative. If there was no consequences for not paying rent or not paying mortgage, who would pay either of them? If there was no legal mechanism to deal with squatters then many landlord would resort to force. It would make drug violence look trivial in comparison.
    exactly!

    Unless the government or the people complaining have a goal of making everybody own no more than one house and make renting illegal.

  4. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by thequietkid10 View Post
    Consider the alternative. If there was no consequences for not paying rent or not paying mortgage, who would pay either of them? If there was no legal mechanism to deal with squatters then many landlord would resort to force.
    I don't have any problem with enforcing contracts that were voluntarily entered into by two fully informed parties. Contracts are one of the cornerstones of Liberty.

    The problem is that many of today's mortgages don't fit that criteria. The mortgages were fraudulently represented to buyers, who the lenders (and/or their broker representatives) knew in advance couldn't afford them. Evicting someone in a case like that would feel to me like working for a loan shark.

    OTOH, if the bank was/is honest (yes, there are a few of them left), then it's another story. The thing is, though, that the honest banks actually have relatively few evictions....
    My blog: www.12knowmore.com
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  5. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by AceNZ View Post
    I don't have any problem with enforcing contracts that were voluntarily entered into by two fully informed parties. Contracts are one of the cornerstones of Liberty.

    The problem is that many of today's mortgages don't fit that criteria. The mortgages were fraudulently represented to buyers, who the lenders (and/or their broker representatives) knew in advance couldn't afford them. Evicting someone in a case like that would feel to me like working for a loan shark.

    OTOH, if the bank was/is honest (yes, there are a few of them left), then it's another story. The thing is, though, that the honest banks actually have relatively few evictions....
    But aren't you assuming only the lender knows the buyer can't afford the mortgage? If the buyer knows as well, however stupid and in denial he is, is it still fraud or wrong? Or, is it even more wrong on the buyer's part, as he made a promise he doesn't intend to keep?

  6. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by AceNZ View Post
    I don't have any problem with enforcing contracts that were voluntarily entered into by two fully informed parties. Contracts are one of the cornerstones of Liberty.

    The problem is that many of today's mortgages don't fit that criteria. The mortgages were fraudulently represented to buyers, who the lenders (and/or their broker representatives) knew in advance couldn't afford them. Evicting someone in a case like that would feel to me like working for a loan shark.

    OTOH, if the bank was/is honest (yes, there are a few of them left), then it's another story. The thing is, though, that the honest banks actually have relatively few evictions....
    But isn't there a difference between ones interpretation of a mortgage and the actually mortgage? If the mortgage payment is 1,500 a month and it says 1,500 a month in the contract, and the lender says "you can afford this," and you never bother to check your budget, your financial situation, your career stability, and how much flexibility this gives you, then it's still on you. Regardless of what sales pitch the lender gave you. His job is to sell you a product, not give financial advice.

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