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Thread: IMPORTANT: OFFICIAL HURRICANE THREAD

  1. #1

    Exclamation IMPORTANT: OFFICIAL HURRICANE THREAD

    Please, lets keep this thread bumped guys.

    I wasn't scared until I heard this freakin' CNN weather girl saying that she gasped in disbelief at the latest radar reports. I mean, just tell us the facts and not your personal feelings.

    She claimed that this could be the perfect storm! Living along the coast all my life and having had to evacuate last year, it's been my experience that the media uses scare tactics to freak people out so, I'm not sure what to believe yet.

    Maybe for those of us along the projected path, we can start off talking about preparations, what people are going to buy, and then keep up with how this hurricane is progressing. Also, what are your beliefs about weather modification? Is having a hurricane in late October unusual at all? I don't recall ever experiencing one so late.

    Thanks to presence for beginning this discussion. I didn't mean to step on your toes, I just wanted this topic to get more exposure.
    http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...-quot-NJ-NY-PA

    Last year I put some family items like old photographs and personal mementos in an overnight bag when I had to evacuate. The media built up
    hurricane Irene so bad, I was having visions of Katrina in my head. But it wasn't that bad at all.

    I never bothered to unpack the overnight bag because I figured if it happens again, that will be one less thing I have to worry about. Damn, I wish I don't have to evacuate again!

    Here's more media reports:

    Last edited by libertygrl; 10-25-2012 at 10:43 AM.
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com



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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by libertygrl View Post
    Please, lets keep this thread bumped guys.

    I wasn't scared until I heard this freakin' CNN weather girl saying that she gasped in disbelief at the latest radar reports. I mean, just tell us the facts and not your personal feelings.

    She claimed that this could be the perfect storm! Living along the coast all my life and having had to evacuate last year, it's been my experience that the media uses scare tactics to freak people out so, I'm not sure what to believe yet.

    Maybe for those of us along the projected path, we can start off talking about preparations, what people are going to buy, and then keep up with how this hurricane is progressing. Also, what are your beliefs about weather modification? Is having a hurricane in late October unusual at all? I don't recall ever experiencing one so late.

    Thanks to presence for beginning this discussion. I didn't mean to step on your toes, I just wanted this topic to get more exposure.
    http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...-quot-NJ-NY-PA

    Last year I put some family items like old photographs and personal mementos in an overnight bag when I had to evacuate. The media built up
    hurricane Irene so bad, I was having visions of Katrina in my head. But it wasn't that bad at all.

    I never bothered to unpack the overnight bag because I figured if it happens again, that will be one less thing I have to worry about. Damn, I wish I don't have to evacuate again!

    Here's more media reports:


    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  4. #3
    Sandy cranked up right before she hit Cuba but then comes the mountains of Cuba which are very disruptive and will cause her to lose steam a bit. From what I have read there are somewhat chaotic conditions ahead which are generally not favorable to growth so I would be surprised if her intensity increases much. That does not mean as a storm she might no grow in size but I doubt the winds will increase dramatically. That said hurricanes are hard to predict because there are a lot of variables which affect their intensity and movement so it is best to keep an eye out. They generally move slow, 10-15 mph, which gives you time to head out if needed.

    I spent a lot of my life in FL and NC so I have seen many hurricanes come and go. I have had eye walls go over my house more than once. Preparation is the most important thing.

    With regards to October hurricanes, if I recall correctly hurricane season can last into Nov but it is very rare to see one then. Generally they peak around mid Sept.
    Insanity should be defined as trusting the government to solve a problem they caused in the first place. Please do not go insane!

  5. #4
    I follow these guys when big storms approach.

    http://www.easternpaweatherauthority.com/
    Last edited by Root; 10-25-2012 at 10:53 AM.

  6. #5
    Btw, what state are you located in?
    Insanity should be defined as trusting the government to solve a problem they caused in the first place. Please do not go insane!

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by libertygrl View Post
    Is having a hurricane in late October unusual at all? I don't recall ever experiencing one so late.

    October is still considered "hurricane season."

    http://www.stormfax.com/hurmonth.htm

    Only goes to 2006, but there are plenty of US hurricane strikes in OCT.

    Having a few weeks of food and water are a good idea.
    We have allies many of you are not aware of. Watch the tube. Show this to your 30 and under friends. Listen to it. Even if you don't like rap, it has 2.7 million views.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmBnvajSfWU#t=0m16s

    Cut off one min early to avoid war porn.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Root View Post
    I follow these guys when big storms approach.

    http://www.easternpaweatherauthority.com/
    Thanks for the link. Great site!
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by TonySutton View Post
    Sandy cranked up right before she hit Cuba but then comes the mountains of Cuba which are very disruptive and will cause her to lose steam a bit. From what I have read there are somewhat chaotic conditions ahead which are generally not favorable to growth so I would be surprised if her intensity increases much. That does not mean as a storm she might no grow in size but I doubt the winds will increase dramatically. That said hurricanes are hard to predict because there are a lot of variables which affect their intensity and movement so it is best to keep an eye out. They generally move slow, 10-15 mph, which gives you time to head out if needed.

    I spent a lot of my life in FL and NC so I have seen many hurricanes come and go. I have had eye walls go over my house more than once. Preparation is the most important thing.

    With regards to October hurricanes, if I recall correctly hurricane season can last into Nov but it is very rare to see one then. Generally they peak around mid Sept.
    I just looked up hurricane season. You are right. It lasts until Nov. 30.

    Yeah, I guess it would be hard to predict. My concern is that cold front coming in at the same time. Even if the storm is along the coast, the cold front inland can attrack the storm towards itself. At least that's what Sam Champion said in that video.

    Let me ask you guys. What's an alternative if we lose cell phone power and or a signal. At first I was concerned with just the power but then I read how the storm can just as soon affect the cell phone towers as well. Obviously, it may not hit them all but I read all it takes is one tower and if that's the one closest to where you live to get a signal, you're screwed.
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com



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  11. #9
    When big storms hit and knock out the electricity do not count on any phones working for very long. Land lines and cell phones all use battery backup which is why they still work when you lose power at your house. Unfortunately these batteries will only last a certain length of time. They will have generators to keep the batteries from dieing but sometimes even that is not fool proof, especially when lots of trees topple or lose branches.

    The best thing you can do to prepare is to make sure you have plenty of food and water to last you for 1-2 weeks. Make sure this is food you can prepare without electricity. Remember everything in your fridge and freezer will spoil if you lose electricity for several days. If you have a chest freezer, make sure you have gallon jugs of water in it. These large ice cubes will last a long time especially if you keep the unit closed.

    Here is a very important tip. Fill your bathtub full of water, as high as it will go. This is not for drinking. It is for flushing your toilet. If your well pump has no electricity or if you local water facility is damaged so bad they can not produce water pressure, you will want water for flushing.

    Get baby wipes for bathing.

    Also, candles, matches and batteries are good to have
    Insanity should be defined as trusting the government to solve a problem they caused in the first place. Please do not go insane!

  12. #10
    Luckily it looks to be heading straight for Washington D.C.
    Quote Originally Posted by timosman View Post
    This is getting silly.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    It started silly.
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  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by TonySutton View Post
    When big storms hit and knock out the electricity do not count on any phones working for very long. Land lines and cell phones all use battery backup which is why they still work when you lose power at your house. Unfortunately these batteries will only last a certain length of time. They will have generators to keep the batteries from dieing but sometimes even that is not fool proof, especially when lots of trees topple or lose branches.

    The best thing you can do to prepare is to make sure you have plenty of food and water to last you for 1-2 weeks. Make sure this is food you can prepare without electricity. Remember everything in your fridge and freezer will spoil if you lose electricity for several days. If you have a chest freezer, make sure you have gallon jugs of water in it. These large ice cubes will last a long time especially if you keep the unit closed.

    Here is a very important tip. Fill your bathtub full of water, as high as it will go. This is not for drinking. It is for flushing your toilet. If your well pump has no electricity or if you local water facility is damaged so bad they can not produce water pressure, you will want water for flushing.

    Get baby wipes for bathing.

    Also, candles, matches and batteries are good to have

    Thanks for the suggestions Tony. Sounds like a plan. I only have use of a cell phone so while I know it is limited, I would still like to have it available even for a short time.
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  14. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Root View Post
    I follow these guys when big storms approach.

    http://www.easternpaweatherauthority.com/
    Nice thanks for the link, I'm in eastern PA. Also thanks for the thread, I actually didn't even hear about this hurricane before now.

  15. #13
    So far south still and they can make that kinda prediction so far north?
    Pfizer Macht Frei!

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  16. #14
    i lived about 2 blocks from the beach in Virginia Beach when Hurricane Isabel made landfall. The storm surge was crazy high, probably at least 8-10 feet.

    That wasn't the end of the world, this won't be either. Newscasters like to blow $#@! up because that's how they keep their ratings up. The worst part of Isabel was not having power for ~ 8-9 days. You just need to prepare if you're in an area where you're likely to lose power to be able to get by without it. If you're at sea level or near it, try to find somewhere to hang out that's more elevated. Stay inside during the worst of the storm.

    Other than that, they usually aren't that big of a deal. I've been through several major hurricanes. It floods for a couple of days, you lose power for a while, then you have to go outside and pick up all the downed tree limbs and $#@! and go about with your life. There isn't any reason to be scared, just prepare and you'll be fine.

  17. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by libertygrl View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions Tony. Sounds like a plan. I only have use of a cell phone so while I know it is limited, I would still like to have it available even for a short time.
    The nice thing about cell phones is that even though you might lose them for a day or 2 the cell phone companies have COLTs that they will drive in to replace lost towers/sites to get coverage back up.

    Insanity should be defined as trusting the government to solve a problem they caused in the first place. Please do not go insane!

  18. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by libertygrl View Post

    Last year I put some family items like old photographs and personal mementos in an overnight bag when I had to evacuate.

    Have you considered making hi-res scans of your important photographs?

    If I have a document or photo that I really don't want to lose, I'll scan it and then either store it online or email it to myself.

    I know it's not the same thing as having the originals, but in a worst-case scenario having electronic copies of treasured old family photos are a lot better than losing them completely.



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  20. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by KCIndy View Post
    Have you considered making hi-res scans of your important photographs?

    If I have a document or photo that I really don't want to lose, I'll scan it and then either store it online or email it to myself.

    I know it's not the same thing as having the originals, but in a worst-case scenario having electronic copies of treasured old family photos are a lot better than losing them completely.
    Yeah, I had been planning to do that for a while now, but I haven't had the time to do it. My cousin gave me copies of a few cds of old family photos that he had scanned himself. So while I have those, I still have my own that need to be done. But you're right, it's better to have them backed up electronically.
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  21. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by MoneyWhereMyMouthIs2 View Post
    October is still considered "hurricane season."

    http://www.stormfax.com/hurmonth.htm

    Only goes to 2006, but there are plenty of US hurricane strikes in OCT.

    Having a few weeks of food and water are a good idea.
    Reported!








  22. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Danke View Post
    So far south still and they can make that kinda prediction so far north?
    As you know, they use computerized weather tracking systems so I guess they just put in all the pertinent data of the model they are tracking now,
    and it gives a prediction based on what they feed it. I'm guessing wind velocity, it's current trajectory, etc.

    Again, it's a prediction so it doesn't necessarily mean it will follow the path they predict. As someone here said, hurricanes can change direction very quickly. But one of the meterologists did say that the particular tracking system they use has been pretty accurate so far.
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  23. #20
    Libertygrl, after reading up a bit on the storm, I wouldn't worry about the high winds or possibility of snow. The winds are supposed to top out at 65mph gusts, which sounds scary but usually just means you'll be picking up sticks and limbs (and your neighbor's trash cans) the next day.

    The biggest threat to your area is going to be the threat of flooding. If I were you, that would be my number one concern at this point.

    Are you in a low-lying area? Do you know if your neighborhood has ever flooded before?

    I don't know what state you're in, but as an example (and useful to Brandon, who mentioned eastern PA) you should be able to look up maps like this one, which can give a better idea of areas prone to flooding:

    http://climate.met.psu.edu/features/...PEMA_flood.php

    You can also get on to Google maps and hit the "terrain" feature and pull up topographic maps of your area.

    The weather service is predicting up to five inches of rain for NYC and surrounding areas. If you live *anywhere* other than really high ground (top of hill or bluff, or well up the side of a hill) you'll want to be vigilant about flash flooding. If you're in a flat, open area, or near a creek or river, or near the bottom of a valley or ravine, it should be of special concern.

    Don't panic, just keep the car packed and get set to run to higher ground. Worst case? If you're prepared, you might have to spend a night or two in a motel, or with friends or relatives. (Although in my case, spending the night with MY relatives would BE the disaster, ha!!!)

    Stay alert, be prepared, and you'll be fine. Keep us posted on how things turn out!

  24. #21
    Im excited. Big waves ahead. Btw... Ive lived oceanfront for years, and came back to see many homes on my street destroyed. Worst storm for me was hurricane fran, 1996, which was a cat 3 storm following a mean little bertha, cat 2, which had hit weeks earlier.

    I cant even count how many hurricanes ive been through. Prepare for the worst, have food and water, at least 20 gal of gas in cans. But usually they are tame. People who usually die are those who are hit by falling trees.
    Last edited by asurfaholic; 10-25-2012 at 12:47 PM.

  25. #22
    I'd never evacuate my home. I'd come back to see it was ransacked by some dip$#@!.
    A savage barbaric tribal society where thugs parade the streets and illegally assault and murder innocent civilians, yeah that is the alternative to having police. Oh wait, that is the police

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    How to trigger a liberal: "I didn't get vaccinated."

  26. #23
    I am on the west coast of Florida. The predictions for over here are just some high winds.

    Not too big of a deal.
    Definition of political insanity: Voting for the same people expecting different results.

  27. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by KCIndy View Post
    Libertygrl, after reading up a bit on the storm, I wouldn't worry about the high winds or possibility of snow. The winds are supposed to top out at 65mph gusts, which sounds scary but usually just means you'll be picking up sticks and limbs (and your neighbor's trash cans) the next day.

    The biggest threat to your area is going to be the threat of flooding. If I were you, that would be my number one concern at this point.

    Are you in a low-lying area? Do you know if your neighborhood has ever flooded before?

    I don't know what state you're in, but as an example (and useful to Brandon, who mentioned eastern PA) you should be able to look up maps like this one, which can give a better idea of areas prone to flooding:

    http://climate.met.psu.edu/features/...PEMA_flood.php

    You can also get on to Google maps and hit the "terrain" feature and pull up topographic maps of your area.

    The weather service is predicting up to five inches of rain for NYC and surrounding areas. If you live *anywhere* other than really high ground (top of hill or bluff, or well up the side of a hill) you'll want to be vigilant about flash flooding. If you're in a flat, open area, or near a creek or river, or near the bottom of a valley or ravine, it should be of special concern.

    Don't panic, just keep the car packed and get set to run to higher ground. Worst case? If you're prepared, you might have to spend a night or two in a motel, or with friends or relatives. (Although in my case, spending the night with MY relatives would BE the disaster, ha!!!)

    Stay alert, be prepared, and you'll be fine. Keep us posted on how things turn out!
    Thanks KCIndy. You're right. The flooding is going to be more of a concern- especially since I live along the shore and we are supposed to also be a high tide as well. We've had some nor'easters over the years. Last year we evacuated further north to a relative's house (a relative that I actually like - LOL). Unfortunately she has since moved. But the storm did not cause any major flooding. Only one time did I actually see some flooding in the streets. That was back in the early 90's. The water was slowly building up over the sidewalks. I actually drove through it after leaving work early because of a bad cold. It was not a fun sight to see. It was very unnerving to say the least. Thankfully it didn't get any worse than that and it receeded.

    So... we'll see how it goes. At least I have until Sunday night to prepare. Besides the concern factor I guess I'm a little spoiled as well. I hate the inconvenience of it all!
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com



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  29. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by asurfaholic View Post
    Im excited. Big waves ahead. Btw...
    This is probably like Christmas time for you surfer dudes.
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  30. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by KCIndy View Post
    Libertygrl, after reading up a bit on the storm, I wouldn't worry about the high winds or possibility of snow. The winds are supposed to top out at 65mph gusts, which sounds scary but usually just means you'll be picking up sticks and limbs (and your neighbor's trash cans) the next day.

    The biggest threat to your area is going to be the threat of flooding. If I were you, that would be my number one concern at this point.

    Are you in a low-lying area? Do you know if your neighborhood has ever flooded before?

    I don't know what state you're in, but as an example (and useful to Brandon, who mentioned eastern PA) you should be able to look up maps like this one, which can give a better idea of areas prone to flooding:

    http://climate.met.psu.edu/features/...PEMA_flood.php

    You can also get on to Google maps and hit the "terrain" feature and pull up topographic maps of your area.

    The weather service is predicting up to five inches of rain for NYC and surrounding areas. If you live *anywhere* other than really high ground (top of hill or bluff, or well up the side of a hill) you'll want to be vigilant about flash flooding. If you're in a flat, open area, or near a creek or river, or near the bottom of a valley or ravine, it should be of special concern.

    Don't panic, just keep the car packed and get set to run to higher ground. Worst case? If you're prepared, you might have to spend a night or two in a motel, or with friends or relatives. (Although in my case, spending the night with MY relatives would BE the disaster, ha!!!)

    Stay alert, be prepared, and you'll be fine. Keep us posted on how things turn out!
    All good advice...also, be sure to stock up on food and water to have at home, just in case stores aren't open for awhile. You might also lose electricity, so be prepared for that. We were without electricity almost a week after Isaac. Get some batteries and flashlights ready.

  31. #27
    I think I'll just accept what this guy is saying first, instead of freaking out over what the cable news stations are broadcasting. He sounds more level headed:


    2. Local Long Island, NY weather report:

    Hurricane Sandy: Another Perfect Storm?
    As the hurricane tracks towards Long Island, experts say it's too soon to compare it with the deadly 1991 storm.

    Despite Internet buzz that Hurricane Sandy could equal another Perfect Storm, experts say it's too soon to tell if the weather tracking toward Long Island will be as devastating as that deadly 1991 storm.

    According to David Stark, meteorologist for the National Weather Service office at Upton, experts are now "confident that Long Island will see some impacts from Sandy."

    The new official forecast track, Stark said, has the storm hitting 100 miles southwest of Riverhead on Tuesday at 8 a.m.

    The Perfect Storm, in 1991, was a lethal combination of a low-pressure system, a high-pressure system, and Hurricane Grace, that came together to wreak widespread havoc on the Northeast, resulting in 13 deaths.

    Hurricane Sandy slammed Jamaica on Wednesday and unleashed her wrath on eastern Cuba on Thursday. NWS sources said the official track indicates the hurricane first moving northward across the Bahamas, and then, eventually, turning northeast out over the western Atlantic and toward Long Island.

    The storm will run "well to the east of the mid-Atlantic, North Carolina area" over the weekend, NWS meteorologist Peter Wichrowski said. By Monday or Tuesday, it is expected to make a turn toward Long Island, or just east of the area, near Montauk.

    On Thursday, Stark said the hurricane could transition to a post-tropical storm but could still be a "significant event," impacting Long Island.

    "The biggest uncertainty we have is in the details," Stark said. "If the track does pan out, we can expect heavy rains, strong winds, coastal flooding and strong waves."

    Downed trees and power lines are also a strong possibility.

    The storm, however, is still five days out, Stark said. "It does appear that, rather than the storm going out to sea, there is a growing confidence that we will be impacted. We just don't how bad it could be."

    Forecaster Jim Cisco of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration prediction center in College Park, Maryland, told the Huffington Post, "We don't have many modern precedents for what the models are suggesting."

    The storm, Huffington Post reports, is likely to hit during a full moon when tides are near their highest, increasing coastal flooding potential, according to NOAA forecasts ó with all the earmarks of a billion-dollar storm.

    Internet speculation is rampant that the Sandy could rival the Perfect Storm of 1991 ó haunting scores of residents scared of Halloween devastation.

    When asked about the Perfect Storm comparison, Stark said it's too soon to tell. "A Perfect Storm ó making those comparisons right now is a little premature. This far in the game, to make a comparison like that, is not a good idea," he said. "We donít really know how itís going to evolve."

    Stark said that Sandy has the potential to be a "significant storm. We'll have to see how the forecast scenario pans out," he said.


    h ttp://westislip.patch.com/articles/hurricane-sandy-another-perfect-storm
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
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  32. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by cajuncocoa View Post
    All good advice...also, be sure to stock up on food and water to have at home, just in case stores aren't open for awhile. You might also lose electricity, so be prepared for that. We were without electricity almost a week after Isaac. Get some batteries and flashlights ready.
    I know. In was a kid when we were out of electricity for 2 weeks! We ate plenty of Spam back then! (To this day, I still don't know exactly what I was eating! Maybe it's better that I don't find out!) LOL. Thanks!
    Paranoia is having all of the facts.
    www.classifiedwoman.com

  33. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by asurfaholic View Post
    Im excited. Big waves ahead...


    I hope you like it! Great show. I was one of its "dozens of fans!" /David Milch
    Last edited by Lucille; 10-25-2012 at 02:01 PM.
    Based on the idea of natural rights, government secures those rights to the individual by strictly negative intervention, making justice costless and easy of access; and beyond that it does not go. The State, on the other hand, both in its genesis and by its primary intention, is purely anti-social. It is not based on the idea of natural rights, but on the idea that the individual has no rights except those that the State may provisionally grant him. It has always made justice costly and difficult of access, and has invariably held itself above justice and common morality whenever it could advantage itself by so doing.
    --Albert J. Nock

  34. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by nobody's_hero View Post
    Luckily it looks to be heading straight for Washington D.C.
    LMAO

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