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    Exclamation Police Abuse

    By request.

    A running compilation of the human victims of police abuse: a place for the Patricia Cooks, Nick Christies, Oscar Grants and Kelly Thomases.
    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 04-12-2014 at 03:42 PM.



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    I'll start:

    Bug Splat.

    Combat Quals.

    Circular Force Continuum.

    <<high five>>




    Family Believes Towler Couldn't See or Hear Officers

    http://www.wset.com/story/19608792/f...-hear-officers

    Posted: Sep 21, 2012 4:40 PM EST



    Altavista, VA - Delma Towler's family wants an apology from Altavista police. Friday, her oldest daughter spoke with ABC 13 News for the first time since Wednesday night when an Altavista officer shot and killed Towler.

    Madeline Clark says it was impossible for her mom to have seen officers or even hear them saying drop the weapon. Towler's hearing aids were not in her ears, and her glasses were not on.

    Friday, the family took us inside Towler's home. They showed us first-hand why they say Towler is a victim in this case. They showed us her hearing aids still in the house and bullet holes in the ceiling. They say she was not trying to shoot at an officer, but was chasing what she believed was an intruder out of her home.

    "Someone came in to this house terrorizing her. And she started shooting just to scare them. There's bullet holes up on the ceiling. There's another one right there," said Madeline Clark, Towler's daughter.

    Delma Towler's daughter says the 83-year-old was protecting herself. She was a good Christian woman, who had never fired a gun in her life. She says Towler would never have fired at an officer.

    "If she were shooting at somebody to kill, she wouldn't have been shooting at the ceiling. She's just trying to frighten them away," said Clark.

    Family says there may have been an intruder. Their proof: Towler's pocketbook is gone.

    "And she kept it sitting right here beside her recliner - and it's missing," said Clark, pointing to a table alongside the living room chair.

    Events inside Towler's home are just the start; questions remain about Towler's final moments. Her family says, for safety, Towler left her own home and walked to her sister's two doors down. It was there, an officer shot and killed Towler. Her sister Margaret says she saw the whole thing.

    "And Margaret said she did not have a gun pointed at anybody. She was trying to get in to the deck gate to get in to the house," said Clark.

    But, the state police investigation indicates Towler refused to put down her gun. Her family says Towler couldn't have seen or heard the officer. Her glasses were in her home and her hearing aids off.

    "She didn't have her hearing aids on because here they are right here," said Clark.

    More than anything, family wants an apology from Altavista Police.

    "How do you move forward?" we asked Clark.

    "I don't know," she replied. "They took my mama."

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    Detroit police officer charged in shooting death of Aiyana Stanley-Jones, 7, during raid

    http://www.freep.com/article/2011100...yssey=nav|head

    Detroit Police Officer Joseph Weekley has been arraigned on an indictment on charges of involuntary manslaughter and careless and reckless discharge of a firearm causing death in the May 2010 slaying of Aiyana Stanley-Jones during a raid.

    Also charged in an indictment is Allison Howard, 42, of Boston. She is charged with perjury and obstruction of justice. Wayne County prosecutors said Howard was a photographer with “The First 48,” which had a crew following the Special Response Team the night of the raid.

    Weekley and Howard will be back in court Friday for a pretrial hearing before Judge Cynthia Gray Hathaway.

    Assistant prosecutor Robert Moran told the court that she lied during the investigative subpoena, adding seven months onto the investigation into the shooting by Michigan State Police.

    But her lawyer, Robert Harrison, said she will be cleared.

    "This is just a horrible thing when she was just doing her job," he said. "This is just a terrible, awful kind of circumstance that shouldn't happen and it will be corrected."

    She's a 15-year, highly respected veteran of video production, he said.

    Worthy said she couldn’t comment on the indictments of Weekley and Howard.

    The two were arraigned before Wayne County Circuit Judge Margie Braxton.

    Charles Jones, Aiyana’s father, was arrested today and is facing at least 5 charges: First–degree murder, felon in possession of a firearm, felony firearm, habitual fourth offense and perjury at a court proceeding in the shooting of Je’Rean Blake, a teen killed two days before the raid, Worthy said.

    He is to be arraigned in 36th District Court Wednesday.

    Also charged in Blake’s murder is Chauncey Owens, who admitted to killing the 17-year-old and had agreed to testify that Charles Jones gave him the gun he used in the shooting after Blake gave him a dirty look.

    Owens had been the target of the raid on the Lillibridge home on the city’s east side.

    Weekley fatally shot Aiyana on May 16, 2010, when police entered the home searching for a shooting suspect. The police were accompanied by the camera crew filming a reality-style cable TV show.

    Police sources previously told the Free Press that, during the raid, Weekley was first through the door and that the girl’s grandmother, Mertilla Jones, tried to grab his gun, which fired and hit Aiyana. Jones has denied this accusation.

    Steve Fishman, Weekley’s attorney, said Weekley didn’t do anything criminal.

    “He knows he didn’t do anything wrong,” Fishman said. “He knows he was acting as a police officer on a dangerous mission.”

    In March, the prosecutor’s office received a warrant request from the Michigan State police, which investigated the shooting.

    The Stanley-Jones family lawyer Geoffrey Fieger said he is still concerned about a recording of the shooting that he was shown that is different than one made by a camera crew from television reality show “The First 48.” That second video has not been located since it was privately shown to Fieger.

    "All I know is that the (missing) video is pretty dramatic,” he said. “You can see the gunman shooting into the house from the outside.”

    The video that police have “is very different,” he said. “It doesn’t show a thing.”

    Fieger contends the shot came from outside of the house and struck Aiyana while she was sleeping with her grandmother on a living room couch.

    The Michigan State Police conducted a 10-month investigation into Aiyana's killing, and in March submitted a warrant request to prosecutors.

    An independent autopsy contradicted initial reports that Aiyana was shot through the neck. Macomb County Medical Examiner Daniel Spitz determined that the shot struck Aiyana in the top of the head and the bullet exited through her neck.
    Bing: Use this difficult moment to bring community, police together

    Detroit Mayor Dave Bing released a statement today: "We respect the legal process regarding this tragic incident. Our condolences remain with all affected by this tragedy. On behalf of Chief Godbee and all of members of the Detroit Police Department, we must use this difficult moment to continue bringing our community and police department together."

    Godbee also released a statement: "Regarding the duty status of Police Officer Joseph Weekley, I will forward this matter to the Board of Police Commissioners for review pursuant to the Detroit Police Department policy."

    The mayor’s office said there will be no further comments because of the pending cases.

  5. #4

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    What were the cops called for? I'm not saying this 80 yr old was going to shoot a cop but if shots were fired, she had a gun in her hand, what would make you think she wasn't going to shoot the cops?

    An old lady who's shooting as the cops are coming in is not a golden reteriver.

  6. #5

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    Forget the two weeks paid vacation. The 'in' thing now is to take several years of paid vacation.

    http://www.westword.com/2012-01-19/n...er-reinstated/

    Ricky Nixon, Denver cop involved in several brutality cases, is reinstated

    Three years ago this past Sunday, Denver police officers pulled over Alex Landau, then nineteen, for allegedly making an illegal left turn onto Emerson Street — and then, wielding flashlights and radios as weapons, they beat him bloody


    Although Landau received one of the city's largest police-brutality settlements — $795,000 — this past May, his story remains a chilling example of racial profiling. And now that story is starting a new chapter, since Officer Ricky Nixon, who was involved in the incident and later fired from the Denver Police Department in connection with a fracas at the Denver Diner, was just ordered reinstated to the force by three hearing officers with the Denver Civil Service Commission....

    On the night of January 15, 2009, Nixon was driving the police car that stopped Landau, a Community College of Denver student who is African-American but had been adopted by a white couple with police officers in their family. The fight allegedly started when Landau asked Nixon if he had a warrant to search his trunk and Nixon responded by punching him in the face; two other officers who'd pulled up to the scene reportedly joined in. Landau was eventually treated for a broken nose, lacerations and closed-head injuries — but not before he demanded that someone take photos of his injuries. Those pictures helped convince the city to settle the federal lawsuit that Landau's attorney had filed....
    And it get's worse...

    Last spring, Garcia had also fired both Randy Murr, one of the officers involved in the Landau incident, and Devin Sparks in connection with the videotaped beating of Michael DeHerrera in LoDo in 2009; this past fall, hearing officers recommended that these officers, too, be reinstated.
    In examining Ricky Nixon there seems to be a pattern of abuse...

    http://www.9news.com/rss/story.aspx?storyid=242144

    DENVER - Another round of reaction came Saturday after two fired Denver Police officers were reinstated to the force.

    Officers Kevin Devine and Ricky Nixon, accused of excessive force and lying on reports, received full reinstatement and back-pay after a decision by the Civil Service Commission.

    The two officers were seen on video in July 2009 at the Denver Diner near Speer Boulevard and Colfax Avenue wrestling handcuffed women to the ground and spraying them in the face with pepper spray....

    The city fired Devine and Nixon, who were accused of lying on their reports about the incident by making it appear they were defending themselves....


    "I'm upset. I'm very hurt," Ana Ortega told 9Wants to Know.
    Ortega says she was one of the women who was pepper sprayed.

    "Reinstating these officers... it makes people think twice about calling 911," Ortega said. "I don't trust the Denver Police Department.
    Nor do I. The 'hearings officers' march in lockstep to get every officer in these events re-instated.

    So the lesson here is. Why go for a two week paid vacation when you can take a couple years off and get a big fat lump sum.
    Seems 'Tricky' Ricky Nixon knows how to play the game.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbauer View Post
    What were the cops called for? I'm not saying this 80 yr old was going to shoot a cop but if shots were fired, she had a gun in her hand, what would make you think she wasn't going to shoot the cops?

    An old lady who's shooting as the cops are coming in is not a golden reteriver.
    If she had just handled her business, and not called the state's goon squad, (unless after the fact to collect the dead/injured) she would still be alive today.

    Is my point.

    Not to mention the details of this whole story are in conflict and confusion.
    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 09-25-2012 at 01:06 PM.

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    This time after being fired for shooting an un-armed man in the back.

    http://blogtown.portlandmercury.com/...-frashour-back

    Ron Frashour, the Portland Police officer who was fired from the force in November 2010 after he shot Aaron Campbell in the back with an assault rifle—killing the distraught, unarmed man outside his home in January 2010— may soon be reinstated into the police force...

    According to the Oregonian, state arbitrator Jane Wilkinson ruled in favor of the Portland Police Association and that Frashour "should get his job back."

    Since his firing, the PPA and other Oregon police organizations have been working hard to win Frashour's job back, insisting that his shooting was justified.
    Just last month, the city settled with Campbell's family for $1.2 million—the most money the city's insurer has ever paid out for a claim against the Portland Police Bureau—and Mayor Sam Adams issued a public apology to the family.
    Of course it seems many agencies fall in lock-step to protect their own. From PPA's and PBA's to Unemployment Agencies.

    THE STATE AGENCY that oversees Oregon cops has come down against Portland's dismissal of Ron Frashour, the officer who shot and killed a suicidal Aaron Campbell last year, clearing Frashour of "gross misconduct" and allowing him to remain certified for police work....

    It also marks the second time since his firing that a state agency has sided against the city about further punishment for Frashour. The Mercury reported this month that the state employment department decided to award Frashour unemployment insurance ["The Check Is in the Mail," News, Feb 10], despite the city's attempt to deny him $500 a week in benefits.

    The police union has long insisted Frashour was justified in shooting Campbell—even though Campbell was likely reacting to a beanbag another cop fired at his back, not reaching for a gun he didn't have. Chief Reese's discipline letter noted that Frashour never considered that possibility, saying that oversight violated bureau policy requiring officers to consider the "totality of circumstances" before using deadly force.
    All this because, apparently, it is well and fine and within policy to shoot an unarmed man in the back...

    http://www.portlandmercury.com/portl...nt?oid=3053450

    The police bureau also released the Use of Force Review Board's report on the shooting, and the bureau's internal affairs investigation—an attempt to explain the discipline to fellow officers as much as to members of the public.

    Taken together, they paint a picture of a chaotic standoff, but one on the verge of being defused, if only everyone had done their jobs properly. Instead, the lapses compounded—leaving a 25-year-old man who wasn't accused of any crime to die outside his Northeast Portland apartment.

    Campbell's family had called 911 because he was distraught over his brother's death and threatened suicide, and he had willingly emerged from his apartment when he was shot.

    Earlier this year, a grand jury found no criminal wrongdoing, but took the unusual step of ripping into the bureau. The city and the four officers disciplined on Tuesday have also been named in a federal lawsuit filed by Campbell's family. Speaking through their attorney, Tom Steenson, the family declined to talk, other than to thank the public and say, "Justice will run its course."
    It's obvious 'Justice' hasn't run it's course in a 'JustUs' world. And just to be clear this isn't the first time this officer has cost the city money...
    But many also said they were disappointed the other officers didn't receive harsher discipline. Advocates wanted Lewton fired, too. They also fret that an arbitrator might overturn Frashour's dismissal—which is precisely what's happened every other time a Portland cop has been fired.

    Frashour, however, has been reprimanded twice before for questionable judgment surrounding use of force. In 2008, he joined a pursuit for a reckless driver but wound up ramming a car that didn't match the one he was supposed to be looking for. Last year, he Tasered a man without warning, sparking a case that wound up costing the city money.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

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    In one town 50% of 'use of force' incidents attributed to 'contempt of cop.'

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...,2525890.story

    A three-year federal investigation into alleged police brutality in Harvey found no pattern of illegal behavior but did conclude the department's "grossly deficient" oversight "tacitly endorses heavy-handed uses of force.".....

    The department began reviewing documents related to use-of-force incidents — in which people suffered a fractured spine, broken jaw and other head injuries — in 2009 and 2010, according to its report.

    That review found that Harvey police weren't properly documenting why and how force was being used, encouraging "an environment in which constitutional violations are more likely, as officers will know they will not be held accountable," the report said. The report noted that in one case a suspect was pepper-sprayed while being fingerprinted at the Harvey police station.

    About half of the incidents involved "contempt of cop" situations in which people were charged with minor ordinance violations such as disorderly conduct, said the report signed by Justice Department special litigation section chief Jonathan M. Smith.

    "These arrests may be designed to justify use of force or other excessive authority where there may have been no legitimate justification for that exercise of authority," the report found.
    And yet the headline reads...

    Federal investigation criticizes Harvey police but finds no illegal brutality
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

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    For police sometimes a Combat Qual isn't enough. They get a $500 bounty.

    Police union gives payments to officers involved in shootings
    The mayor of Albuquerque, where police have shot 23 people in the last two years, urges that the practice end.
    The Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Albuquerque police officers involved in a rash of fatal shootings over the past two years were paid up to $500 under a union program that some have likened to a bounty system in a department with a culture that critics have long contended promotes brutality.

    Mayor Richard Berry called Friday for an immediate halt to the practice, which was first reported in the Albuquerque Journal during a week in which Albuquerque police shot and killed two men. Since 2010, Albuquerque police have shot 23 people, 18 fatally.

    "The administration has nothing to do with how the union conducts their business," Berry said in a statement, "but I was shocked yesterday when made aware of this practice. I cannot stand aside and condone this practice. It needs to end now."

    Although the union said the payments were intended to help the officers decompress from a stressful situation, one victim's father and a criminologist said it sounded more like a reward program.

    "I think it might not be a bounty that they want it for," said Mike Gomez, the father of an unarmed man killed by police last year, "but in these police guys' minds, they know they are going to get that money. So when they get in a situation, it's who's going to get him first? Who's going to shoot him first?"

    Maria Haberfeld, chair of the Department of Law & Police Science at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, said she found the program disturbing.

    "I'm not a psychologist. I'm a criminologist. But if you give somebody a monetary incentive to do their job, usually people are tempted by the monetary incentive," she said. "To me, this is a violation of professional ethics."

    Other law enforcement officials called speculation of a bounty system ridiculous but acknowledged the payments could be poorly perceived.

    "Frankly, it's insulting and very insensitive that somebody would believe that a police officer would factor in a payment for such a difficult decision," said Joe Clure, president of the Phoenix Law Enforcement Association.

    Clure said his union gives officers who fire their guns in the line of duty a $25 dinner card and a few movie tickets. On rare occasions, the union will give as much as $500 for a hotel room and travel for an officer who is having an especially difficult time in the aftermath of a shooting, although he doesn't recall that happening in about 10 years.

    (Dinner and a movie? Common, honey, I just got a combat qual. Let's go celebrate. I hear 'Acts of Valor' is playing. p4p)

    In Idaho, State Police Cpl. Fred Rice, chairman of the Idaho State Police Association, said his organization made a conscious decision not to give cash or checks.

    "That would almost look like to me, if I gave every time an officer involved in a shooting a $500 check, someone might think, 'Oh, that's a quick way to make money,'" he said.

    Rice said his organization takes steps to help officers involved in shootings on a case-by-case basis, usually selecting something specific to help that officer unwind and relax.

    David Klinger, a former police officer who is now a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, said he saw no problem with the program, noting the officers have administrative time off and need to deal with a very stressful situation.

    "I've been through it," he said. "And if someone wanted to say, 'Hey, Dave we want you to go hang out in San Diego and sip sarsaparilla on the seashore,' I think that would be a grand idea."

    The Journal reported that 20 of the 23 officers involved in 20 police shootings in 2010 and 2011 received payments of either $300 or $500 each, which the union said were meant to help them and their families "find a place to have some privacy and time to decompress outside the Albuquerque area."

    Three more men have been shot by Albuquerque police this year, all fatally. It was not known if they have received the union payment.

    Berry called on Police Chief Ray Schultz to work with the union to end the practice. Schultz, who called the practice "troubling," said the union has agreed to hold an emergency board meeting.

    http://www.pressherald.com/news/poli...012-03-24.html
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  12. #11

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    Unarmed innocent man flees scene after being shot at by ICE agent.......

    http://taxdollars.ocregister.com/201...ed-man/149758/
    The last thing Daniel Noriega expected when he dropped off his girlfriend’s son at school was to get shot at — especially by someone with a badge.
    But that’s what happened to Noriega, an Orange County-born carpenter who was shot at by an ICE agent Dec. 1 across from Westmont Elementary School in Anaheim.

    Federal and local authorities are tight lipped about the shooting, pointing to separate investigations by the Anaheim police department and the Department of Homeland Security. The District Attorney’s Office is also reviewing the case.

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman Virginia Kice said only that the unidentified ICE agent is still on duty.

    Noriega, however, is eager to tell his side — which has become more interesting since a fatal shooting Feb. 16 at the ICE office in Long Beach. An agent there seriously wounded his supervisor and then was shot dead by another colleague. The dead agent was being evaluated by his boss.

    The Anaheim episode also brings to mind the Feb. 7 shooting of Camp Pendleton Marine Manuel Loggins at San Clemente High School at 4:40 a.m.
    The Watchdog is a little worried about law enforcement officers opening fire so close to schools. Westmont Elementary, on Loara Street, went into lockdown for 15 minutes because of the shooting, according to a letter sent to parents.

    Noriega, 28, said he had just dropped off his girlfriend’s son at Anaheim Plaza, across from Westmont Elementary, at 8:45 a.m. when an unmarked car screeched to a halt in front of his GMC Yukon.

    A man jumped out, fired at Noriega and then activated the light bar inside the windshield of the car, Noriega said.

    Noriega, speaking at the office of his attorney, Nick O’Malley, said he figured out pretty quickly that the guy with a gun was a cop. But, Noriega said, he wasn’t going to stick around long enough to figure out why the cop was shooting at him.


    “I was fearing for my life. I was just shocked. I was thinking that I’m not going to see my daughter no more,” Noriega said. “He never said, ‘Put your hands up.’ He never gave me a warning. He just got out and fired at me.”

    Noriega said he manuevered his Yukon around the agent’s car and took off, in search of a uniformed police officer. He realized he had left his cell phone at home. Noriega said he fled to a Mobil station in Buena Park, where he borrowed a phone from the attendant to call “911.”

    “I just wanted to find a regular, uniformed cop. I wanted to tell them I just got shot at,” Noriega said.


    Police from Buena Park and Anaheim, as well as ICE agents, flooded the service station. Noriega was taken into custody by Anaheim officers. His SUV was searched and impounded.

    With one hand handcuffed to a chair, Noriega was then questioned by an Anaheim detective about trying to run over a federal agent. He denied trying to run over anybody. He said was just trying to get away from the guy shooting at him.

    Noriega remembered he had seen the shooter a few days earlier at his apartment complex. He and other undercover types had gone to a neighbor’s apartment with a picture of Noriega’s girlfriend’s former boyfriend. Noriega figures ICE agents confused him for the ex-boyfriend.
    While Noriega was talking with Anaheim detectives, law enforcement authorities — he doesn’t know which agency — searched his apartment and told his girlfriend that he tried to kill an agent, Noriega said.

    “Why were they doing this?” Noriega said. “I didn’t want to be charged with something I didn’t do.”

    Police released Noriega that day, drove him home and later picked up the tab for his impounded vehicle, attorney O’Malley says. But, the attorney adds, Noriega is still considered a suspect.

    “I’m scared they might come back and do it again,” Noriega said.

    Anaheim Sgt. Robert Dunn said prosecutors are indeed reviewing whether to file charges against Noriega.

    The case, it would seem, hinges on whether the agent fired before or after Noriega hit the gas.
    There are plenty of other unanswered questions: If the agent feared for his life, why did he fire only once? If the shooting was justified, why did Anaheim let Noriega go?
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  13. #12

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    The Abner Louima Torture Case

    http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documen...torture-case-0




    Already struggling to explain the 41-shot fusillade that killed Amadou Diallo, an unarmed Bronx man, the New York Police Department is bracing for another examination of its alleged brutality. On March 29, jury selection began in the federal trial of the five cops indicted in the Abner Louima torture case. Officers Justin Volpe, Charles Schwarz,Thomas Bruder, and Thomas Wiese have been charged with violating Louima's civil rights for allegedly beating the Haitian immigrant following an August 1997 disturbance outside a Brooklyn nightclub. A fifth cop, Michael Bellomo, has been charged with lying to cover up the incident.

    Prosecutors charge that, along with being beaten in a patrol car, Louima was assaulted in a precinct bathroom, where he was held down by Schwarz while Volpe shoved a wooden stick into his rectum.

    The following NYPD, FBI, and federal court records provide a vivid description of the Louima incident and include detailed accounts provided by three of the arrested cops. Along with the law enforcement reports, you will find a memorandum drafted by Louima attorneys Johnnie Cochran and Peter Neufeld after the pair met privately with Wiese's counsel. During that meeting, Wiese's lawyers shared their client's version of events with Cochran and Neufeld.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  14. #13

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    Kathryn Johnston shooting

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kathryn_Johnston_shooting



    Kathryn Johnston (June 26, 1914 - November 21, 2006) was an elderly Atlanta, Georgia woman who was shot by undercover police officers in her home on Neal Street in northwest Atlanta on November 21, 2006, where she had lived for 17 years.
    Three officers had entered her home in what was later described as a 'botched' drug raid. Officers cut off burglar bars and broke down her door using a no-knock warrant. Police said Johnston fired at them and they fired in response; she fired one shot out the door over the officers' heads and they fired 39 shots, five or six of which hit her. None of the officers were injured by her gunfire, but Johnston was killed by the officers. Police injuries were later attributed to "friendly fire" from each other's weapons.
    One of the officers planted marijuana in Johnston's house after the shooting. Later investigations found that the paperwork stating that drugs were present at Johnston's house, which had been the basis for the raid, had been falsified. The officers later admitted to having lied when they submitted cocaine as evidence claiming that they had bought it at Johnston's house. Three officers were tried for manslaughter and other charges surrounding falsification and were sentenced to ten, six, and five years respectively
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

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    Justified...


    FDLE: Deputy justified in shooting, killing Lake County man

    Andrew Scott shot after opening his apartment door to deputies
    Published On: Sep 25 2012 03:54:10 PM EDT Updated On: Sep 26 2012 12:05:46 AM EDT

    http://www.clickorlando.com/news/FDL...z/-/index.html

    LEESBURG, Fla. - The Florida Department of Law Enforcement ruled on Tuesday that the fatal shooting of a 26-year-old man by Lake County deputies was justified.

    Andrew Lee Scott was shot and killed in July after opening his Leesburg apartment door while pointing a gun at deputies, according to authorities.

    FDLE released its review on Tuesday saying that Deputy Richard Sylvester was justified in shooting Scott, which occurred while they were searching for another man -- Jonathon Brown, who had parked his motorcycle outside of Scott's apartment.

    The report states that a fresh foot print, as well as misunderstanding a neighbor, led deputies to Scott's front door instead of Brown's.

    According to the report, Sylvester fired a total of six shots after Scott opened the door with his gun pointed at Sylvester's face.

    The state attorney's office said law enforcement officers must identify themselves if there is intent to forcibly enter the apartment. In Scott's case, the state attorney found deputies had no intent to forcibly enter the apartment, meaning they didn't need to identify themselves to Scott.

    "If this was not going to be a forcible entry, then why in Heaven's name did the deputy have his gun drawn," said Mark Nejame, Scott's family attorney.

    The report also stated there were inconsistencies in the statements given to deputies by Miranda Mauck, Scott's girlfriend, who was inside of the apartment the night of the shooting. The report states she originally told deputies she didn't see anything, but when she was interviewed again with her attorney present, she said Scott opened the door at a medium speed with the gun held in his left hand. She also said he was shot immediately.

    Nejame said Mauck's inconsistencies were not what mattered.

    "For her to have a relatively minor discrepancy... to me, that's very normal. What's not normal is everybody on the other side's statements lining up one at a time. What does that suggest to you? To many people, that suggests people got together to get their stories straight," he said.

    Sylvester was put back on regular duty last month after LCSO completed its own internal investigation and determined there was no wrongdoing. Lake County Sheriff Gary Borders said he stood by his deputies' decision back in July.

    "The deputy felt that his life and the lives of the deputies at the scene were in danger. And he took that action...because he had to," said Lt. John Herrell, spokesperson for the sheriff's office.

    Scott's neighbors told Local 6 they believe deputies could have done more before opening fire.

    "They had the means to do what they needed to do to find the right person and they didn't do that," said Lauren Downs. "They overreacted. They were trying to do their job but they went too far, and someone lost their life because of it, [someone] that was completely innocent."

    Before the shooting, deputies learned the real suspect they were after was in another apartment, but the deputy who fired failed to get that information. Instead, he assumed the suspect was in Scott's apartment.

    "My Heavens, they even had somebody tell them that they had the wrong guy and they still killed him," said Nejame.

    Nejame said he plans to file a multi-million dollar lawsuit against the Lake County Sheriff's Office on behalf of Scott's family.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    Justified...


    FDLE: Deputy justified in shooting, killing Lake County man

    Andrew Scott shot after opening his apartment door to deputies
    Published On: Sep 25 2012 03:54:10 PM EDT Updated On: Sep 26 2012 12:05:46 AM EDT

    http://www.clickorlando.com/news/FDL...z/-/index.html

    LEESBURG, Fla. - The Florida Department of Law Enforcement ruled on Tuesday that the fatal shooting of a 26-year-old man by Lake County deputies was justified.

    Andrew Lee Scott was shot and killed in July after opening his Leesburg apartment door while pointing a gun at deputies, according to authorities.

    FDLE released its review on Tuesday saying that Deputy Richard Sylvester was justified in shooting Scott, which occurred while they were searching for another man -- Jonathon Brown, who had parked his motorcycle outside of Scott's apartment.

    The report states that a fresh foot print, as well as misunderstanding a neighbor, led deputies to Scott's front door instead of Brown's.

    According to the report, Sylvester fired a total of six shots after Scott opened the door with his gun pointed at Sylvester's face.

    The state attorney's office said law enforcement officers must identify themselves if there is intent to forcibly enter the apartment. In Scott's case, the state attorney found deputies had no intent to forcibly enter the apartment, meaning they didn't need to identify themselves to Scott.

    "If this was not going to be a forcible entry, then why in Heaven's name did the deputy have his gun drawn," said Mark Nejame, Scott's family attorney.

    The report also stated there were inconsistencies in the statements given to deputies by Miranda Mauck, Scott's girlfriend, who was inside of the apartment the night of the shooting. The report states she originally told deputies she didn't see anything, but when she was interviewed again with her attorney present, she said Scott opened the door at a medium speed with the gun held in his left hand. She also said he was shot immediately.

    Nejame said Mauck's inconsistencies were not what mattered.

    "For her to have a relatively minor discrepancy... to me, that's very normal. What's not normal is everybody on the other side's statements lining up one at a time. What does that suggest to you? To many people, that suggests people got together to get their stories straight," he said.

    Sylvester was put back on regular duty last month after LCSO completed its own internal investigation and determined there was no wrongdoing. Lake County Sheriff Gary Borders said he stood by his deputies' decision back in July.

    "The deputy felt that his life and the lives of the deputies at the scene were in danger. And he took that action...because he had to," said Lt. John Herrell, spokesperson for the sheriff's office.

    Scott's neighbors told Local 6 they believe deputies could have done more before opening fire.

    "They had the means to do what they needed to do to find the right person and they didn't do that," said Lauren Downs. "They overreacted. They were trying to do their job but they went too far, and someone lost their life because of it, [someone] that was completely innocent."

    Before the shooting, deputies learned the real suspect they were after was in another apartment, but the deputy who fired failed to get that information. Instead, he assumed the suspect was in Scott's apartment.

    "My Heavens, they even had somebody tell them that they had the wrong guy and they still killed him," said Nejame.

    Nejame said he plans to file a multi-million dollar lawsuit against the Lake County Sheriff's Office on behalf of Scott's family.
    There is Justice, and then there is Just Us.
    "let them search you,touch you,violate your Rights,just don't be a dick!"~ cdc482
    "For Wales. Why Richard, it profits a man nothing to give his soul for the whole world. But for Wales?"
    All my life I've been at the mercy of men just following orders... Never again!~Erik Lehnsherr
    There's nothing wrong with stopping people randomly, especially near bars, restaurants etc.~Velho

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    While it sounds like Derek was not a "good guy", no one deserves this.

    Too bad Nick Christie was white, maybe he would have some advocates in his corner.


    Medical examiner revises suspect's death ruling to homicide

    Sept. 22, 2012

    http://www.jsonline.com/watchdog/wat...170871001.html

    The Milwaukee County medical examiner's office has revised its ruling on the death of Derek Williams, who died in Milwaukee police custody in July 2011, from natural to homicide, according to the district attorney's office.

    The decision came after the Journal Sentinel alerted an assistant medical examiner to newly released records - including a video of a suffocating Williams pleading for help from the back of a squad car - and also made him aware of a national expert who said Williams, 22, did not die naturally of sickle cell crisis.

    In making his initial determination of natural death more than a year ago, Assistant Medical Examiner Christopher Poulos did not review all of the police reports or a squad video recently obtained by the newspaper. The video shows a handcuffed Williams, his eyes rolled back, gasping for breath and begging for help in the back seat of a Milwaukee police car as officers ignore his pleas. The police reports include key details about Williams' arrest that the medical examiner didn't know.

    As a result of the new ruling, Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm is reopening his investigation into whether criminal charges are warranted against any of the officers involved.

    Chisholm, the Police Department and the Fire and Police Commission previously had cleared the officers of wrongdoing, largely based on the medical examiner's earlier ruling of natural death.

    "We're going to revisit it. Absolutely," Chisholm said. "The medical examiners are our experts in these cases. Without any question, we place a tremendous amount of weight in their determination. Any time they revisit one of their determinations, we really take that seriously."

    Chisholm emphasized, however, that the revised finding does not mean a crime was committed. Homicide in medical examiners' parlance means "death at the hands of another." In contrast, the crime of homicide requires prosecutors to prove intent to kill, reckless disregard for life or negligent disregard for life while operating a firearm or a vehicle.

    In a statement, Milwaukee police Chief Edward Flynn said he did not expect any officers to be criminally charged as a result of the new ruling.

    "This second report contains no information that was not in the first report, nor does it present any new objective facts," the statement says.

    In the video, which the paper initially requested last November, Williams struggles to breathe for seven minutes, 45 seconds, then slumps over, unconscious.

    An officer then checks his pulse, props him up in the seat and walks to a nearby supervisor's car. Finding no one there, the officer returns and starts CPR as a different officer calls for medical assistance. Police and paramedics continue CPR for more than 45 minutes before Williams is declared dead.

    Along with Chisholm, Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission Executive Director Michael Tobin and internal affairs Lt. Alfonso Morales viewed the video months ago and determined officers had done nothing wrong, despite department rules requiring police to call for help immediately "if medical treatment becomes necessary."

    The Police Department's Standard Operating Procedures go on to state: "It cannot be overemphasized that members shall continually monitor and remain cognizant of the condition of a person in custody, especially when he/she is in restraints. The arrestee may encounter immediate or delayed physical reactions that may be triggered by the change in physical or environmental factors. Therefore, caution and awareness on the part of the officer is constantly required."

    Flynn agreed with Morales' conclusion that the officers did not violate department rules or the law.

    Milwaukee police spokeswoman Anne E. Schwartz would not answer questions Friday. Via email, she noted that the department has instituted new training on recognizing and responding to medical distress, including sickle cell crisis, in prisoners.

    Tobin said he would review the matter in light of the medical examiner's revised findings.

    Neither the two officers who arrested Williams nor the two officers who took turns sitting in the squad car while Williams was in back responded to email requests for interviews.

    Poulos re-examined Williams' case after the Journal Sentinel informed him that Werner U. Spitz, a forensic pathologist and one of the nation's leading experts on death investigation, believed the death was a homicide.

    Spitz reviewed the case at the newspaper's request . Poulos said in March that he used Spitz's work on sickle cell crisis as a resource in determining how Williams died.

    "Is this a natural death? No. This is not a natural death," Spitz told the Journal Sentinel.

    Spitz said that while sickle cell crisis likely occurred, it was caused by an officer applying pressure to Williams' back - and perhaps his neck - while he was facedown on the ground.

    "This officer didn't have the intention of killing him, but that doesn't mean this kind of restraint should be performed," Spitz said.

    Spitz is co-author of the book "Medicolegal Investigation of Death," considered the medical examiners' bible. In addition to evaluating Poulos' autopsy, he reviewed the video and police reports, which were released to the newspaper under a state open records law request.

    The newspaper first requested the public records in November 2011. The department released the police reports in June and the video last week.

    Williams' loved ones wanted the video to be turned over to the newspaper and made available for the public to see, according to attorney Jonathan Safran, who represents Williams' long-term girlfriend - with whom he had three young children - and Williams' father.

    The two are very upset that officers said Williams was breathing just fine and playing games, according to Safran.

    "(Williams' girlfriend and father) believe that it was obvious that he could not breathe, and they think it is important for others to see and hear the video and draw their own conclusions," Safran said. "They are devastated by the depiction of what happened to Derek."

    The video does not show Williams being arrested or placed in the squad car.

    Poulos' initial autopsy report, written in August 2011, includes this note: "Based on the information at the time of this report, the decedent's interaction with police officers included a chase (running) and no physical altercation; therefore, the manner of death is described as natural."

    The newly released records tell a different story.

    Williams, who had gotten out of jail earlier in the day after being arrested on municipal warrants for loitering, vandalism and assault, fled from police after attempting to rob a couple near the intersection of N. Holton and E. Center streets, according to the reports. He was sweating profusely when police found him hiding behind an overturned card table. Officer Richard M. Ticcioni pulled him out. Ticcioni said he believed rookie Officer Patrick Coe helped him. Ticcioni "ended up on top of Williams with the suspect facing down," according to the report of Milwaukee police Detective Luke O'Day, who interviewed Ticcioni.

    Williams, his hands cuffed behind him, repeatedly told officers he couldn't breathe for at least 15 minutes between the time of his arrest and his death, according to records. He first made the complaint as he lay facedown, Ticcioni pressing a knee across his back, O'Day's report says.

    "As soon as he released pressure, Williams began squirming, as if trying to break free, and reached around his right side to his right waistband (while still in handcuffs)," according to the report. Ticcioni worried that Williams was trying to grab a gun and "reapplied pressure with his right knee to prevent any further movement from the suspect," the report says.

    Officers then searched Williams. No gun was found.

    They got him to his feet, and "Williams immediately went limp," the report says. Ticcioni "laid him on the ground on his back and observed that he was breathing hard."

    "He felt Williams was playing games and directed him to stop messing around," the report says.

    A few minutes later, as officers Ticcioni and Coe were helping Williams walk toward the car, Coe left Williams' side to move a "for sale" sign that was blocking the sidewalk. When he did, Williams "pulled forward and fell face forward into the grass," the report says.

    Ticcioni believed Williams was dragging his feet to make it difficult for the officers to get him to the waiting squad car, the report says.

    Once locked in the back seat, Williams continued to say he could not breathe and asked officers to call him an ambulance, according to the squad video and a summary of the internal investigation. Officers Jeffrey Cline and Jason Bleichwehl, who can be heard talking on the recording, told internal investigators they did not hear Williams ask for an ambulance, the summary says.

    Poulos declined to answer questions Friday.

    In March, he told the newspaper he relied on officer accounts that there was no scuffle and on Spitz's book when he ruled Williams' death natural and due to sickle cell crisis.

    Poulos misinterpreted the book in making that decision, according to Spitz.

    Sickle cell crisis has been the subject of debate in the medical community when it occurs in people such as Williams, who had the genetic marker known as sickle cell trait, but not the disease itself. Sickle cell crisis results when red blood cells suddenly become misshapen, or sickle, blocking blood vessels and preventing oxygen from being carried throughout the body.

    Doctors at the National Institutes of Health say people with only the trait cannot die of sickle cell crisis.

    Pathologists - including Spitz - counter that it can happen in rare cases.

    Sickle cell crisis is caused by oxygen deprivation, Spitz said, and he believes the oxygen deprivation that led to Williams' death occurred when Ticcioni held Williams facedown on the ground and forced his knee into Williams' back.

    Putting pressure on someone's back not only stops the lungs from expanding, it also compresses the abdominal organs toward the diaphragm, further restricting breathing, Spitz said. What's more, even people who do not have the sickle cell trait can suffocate and die if they are restrained in that manner, he said.

    "If you compress the chest, you cannot breathe. If you cannot breathe, you have a problem," he said. "The whole procedure of arresting somebody by causing them to be asphyxiated is not what should be done."

    Officers often mistake the struggle to breathe for an attempt to resist arrest, so they use more force or apply a chokehold, worsening the problem, Spitz said.

    There is no mention of a chokehold in any of the reports.

    But a cracked hyoid bone in Williams' neck - revealed during the autopsy - is an indication that one of the officers may have put him in a chokehold, Spitz said.

    "The hyoid bone fracture is not necessarily harmful, but it indicates with 99% certainty that some force was applied to the area," he said.

    It takes tremendous pressure to break the hyoid bone. The injury occurs in only one-third of homicides by strangulation, according to the Journal of Forensic Sciences.

    Poulos had attributed the cracked hyoid bone to medical intervention during resuscitation. Spitz said the possibility of that is so remote it should not be considered unless the investigation conclusively proves Williams' neck was not compressed by police restraining him.

    "In the absence of another explanation, I think it was done during restraint rather than CPR or intubation," Spitz said. "Under the circumstances of this and from what I've seen, everything in my view seems to suggest a neck hold."

    Police on the scene and those who investigated afterward reached another flawed conclusion when they determined that Williams must be breathing OK because he could talk, according to Spitz.

    Passing enough air over the vocal cords to speak doesn't mean someone is breathing normally - especially if they are saying they cannot breathe, he said.

    If authorities would have taken Williams seriously and gotten him oxygen quickly, he could have survived, Spitz said.

    "If they did what they were taught in the Police Academy, maybe that should be changed," he said.

    Attorney Robin Shellow, who represents Williams' mother, said anyone trained in CPR, including the officers at the scene, should have known he was in trouble.

    "Any layperson observing Derek for more than a nanosecond would have realized he was in medical distress," she said. "The police acknowledge they heard his cries for help. They acknowledge that they heard Derek's words that he could not breathe. The police acknowledge they saw him writhing in the back of the squad car and gasping for air. Why let him suffer for so long until his heart finally stopped?"

    It isn't fair to expect police to react the same as average citizens, according to Chisholm. Anyone who works in law enforcement knows suspects often pretend they are sick or hurt in order to avoid being arrested, he said.

    "If 99 times out of 100, someone is essentially faking, and the signs of acute emergency mimic that behavior, you have to take it as what's reasonable from an officer's perspective," he said.

    The same is true when describing the use of force or a struggle, Chisholm said. What police officers consider normal may not seem that way to people who don't witness arrests every day, he said.

    In June, after the Fire and Police Commission review, Tobin recommended that the Police Department consider training on the topic of sickle cell crisis.

    As a result of that recommendation, the department has added a component to its CPR training that addresses responding to medical distress and sickle cell crisis, Schwartz said in an email. It will be presented at the academy for the current recruit class. Officers already on the job will receive the training at their next in-service.

    Tobin also proposed that the Police Department complete its internal reviews more quickly.

    In response to that recommendation, the department last week created a critical incident review board, which will respond to "incidents involving Department members that result in great bodily harm or death, or injury caused by a police member's use of a firearm," according to a newly adopted standard operating procedure.

    Schwartz said the review board will provide "a new level of improved and thorough review for critical incidents."

    "It also provides for independent participation and review of the process," she said in a statement.

    The review board's membership will not include anyone outside the Police Department. All members will be selected by Flynn, and an assistant chief will oversee it. Board reports and recommendations will be presented to Flynn and Tobin, and whether to implement them will be solely up to Flynn.

    In addition, Tobin - an attorney and former police officer - now is paged by a dispatcher any time a critical incident occurs, and either he or a Fire and Police Commission investigator responds to the scene of such incidents.

    Safran, the attorney who represents Williams' girlfriend, is considering a civil suit on behalf of Williams' three children, ages 4, 3 and 1. Safran also plans to ask the U.S. attorney's office to review the case.

    Safran said he is pleased the medical examiner revised his findings, but questions remain .

    "The family and I have significant concerns with the actions of police officers, both at the time of Mr. Williams' arrest and while he was gasping for air in the back of the police squad car," Safran said.

    "The issues raised in this case support our office's ongoing concerns that in situations where there are claims of police misconduct - especially crimes such as excessive force, or where there is a death or substantial injury claimed due to police actions - that an outside agency might be more effective and impartial in conducting an investigation," he said.

  18. #17

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    Are songs allowed on this thread?

    "The danger is not that a particular class is unfit to govern. Every class is unfit to govern."
    ~Lord Acton

    “Do not conquer the world with force, for force only causes resistance. Thorns spring up when an army passes. Years of misery follow a great victory. Do only what needs to be done without using violence.” ~Lao Tzu

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    911 Recordings Released from Altavista Shooting

    Posted: Sep 28, 2012 4:42 PM EDT
    By Mark Kelly - bio | email

    Associated Links

    Family Believes Towler Couldn't See or Hear Officers
    Family: Woman Shot by Police Officer Was 83 Years Old

    http://www.wset.com/story/19668957/9...vista-shooting

    Altavista, VA - Friday, ABC 13 obtained the 911 recordings from the Altavista police shooting that killed Delma Towler. Dispatchers tried several times to get Towler to answer her phone, even warning her at one point that officers were outside. But it ended when an Altavista officer shot and killed the 83-year-old.

    Friday, ABC 13 spoke with Towler's daughter. Understandably, Madeline Clark is very upset one week after her mom's death. But, to Towler's family, the recordings are proof their version of the events that night is right.

    "Yes, this is Campbell County 911. We had a 911 hang up call from this resident. The Altavista Police Department is outside and needs someone to come to the door. They're there to check on you," said dispatcher, Campbell County.

    One week later, 911 recordings are painting a clearer picture of the beginning. According to family, Delma Towler never heard that voicemail. In fact, it was impossible. She did not have her hearing aids in or glasses on.

    "Delma, are you there? Hello," said a dispatcher in a second recording.

    The death certificate tells the ending: Delma Towler took a bullet to the neck, pelvis and leg. Her body found in her sister's front yard. To make matters worse, her family says she was trying to get a supposed intruder out of her home. And they say this recording proves just that: "Delma," said the dispatcher, as Towler's dog Sugar is barking.

    "What stands out to you?" we asked Clark.

    "The dog barking. That tells me somebody was in that house," said Clark.

    Scared, family says Towler grabbed her handgun firing warning shots into the ceiling.

    But, law enforcement tell a different story. The State Police investigation says Towler pointed her gun at Altavista Police.

    "Yes, this is Campbell County 911," said dispatcher. "We have officers outside of your residence. They advice me you're armed with a handgun. You need to put it away. It is the police department. They are trying to check on you."

    The police department that responded to Towler's 911 call, in the end, took her life. Towler's family just wants the truth:

    "I'm just numb," said Clark. "I feel lost. The world just feels empty without my mother in it."

    The 911 recordings show Campbell County dispatchers tried a handful of times to contact Towler. But, family says that with no hearing aids, no glasses and a supposed intruder in her home, Towler was in no position to answer the voicemail.

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    Border Patrol agent fatally shoots California woman

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/09/29...est=latestnews



    CHULA VISTA, Calif. – A Border Patrol agent fatally shot a 32-year-old mother of five Friday in suburban San Diego as he rode on the hood of her car after she ran into him, authorities and family members said.

    The agent fired after being driven several hundred yards on the hood, Chula Vista police Capt. Gary Wedge told The Associated Press. The woman was later identified in a police statement as Valeria Alvarado.

    The shooting occurred about five miles north of the Mexican border as plainclothes agents were looking to serve a felony warrant in the area to someone other than Alvarado, Border Patrol Deputy Chief Rodney Scott told U-T San Diego.

    Scott said the agent was stuck atop the car as Alvarado drove.

    "Fearing for his life, he discharged his weapon to get the vehicle to stop," Scott said. No other agents fired.

    Alvarado was declared dead at the scene, and the agent was taken to a hospital. His injuries were not clear.

    After talking to investigators, family members including her husband and cousin told U-T San Diego that Alvarado was a housewife and mother of five children ranging from ages 3 to 17 who went by the name Monique.

    "I love her to the fullest. That's my heart," husband Gilbert Alvarado said. "Where's the evidence my wife threatened a trained officer? I want justice."

    Family members said Valeria Alvarado grew up in Chula Vista where the shooting took place but had been living about five miles away in the Southcrest neighborhood of San Diego, and they did not know why she was in her former hometown.

    Hector Salazar, one of several neighbors who witnessed the incident, said he saw a man in civilian clothes on the hood of a black car aiming a gun at the windshield.

    Salazar told U-T San Diego the man started pulling the trigger, and he heard about five shots. Moments later, other plainclothes agents approached the car, he said.

    The person named in the warrant the agents were serving was not apprehended, Scott said.

    The FBI and Chula Vista police are investigating.

  21. #20

  22. #21

  23. #22

    Default

    I want to see people taking their guns out and blowing those rogue cop fucks away.

    The American people have to start sticking up for each other like this.

    How else are these rogue cops going to learn their lesson?
    Abolish the Privately Owned Federal Reserve Bank Corporation!
    How many more times are we going to let them screw up our economy?

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelwise View Post
    I want to see people taking their guns out and blowing those rogue cop fucks away.

    The American people have to start sticking up for each other like this.

    How else are these rogue cops going to learn their lesson?
    Wow, terrible idea. Violence is not the answer. We must educate the population about liberty and use nonviolent means like civil disobedience and noncompliance.

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    Heroic Duluth Cop Richard Jouppi Assaults a Man in a Wheelchair

    Posted by William Grigg on October 2, 2012 03:51 PM

    http://www.lewrockwell.com/blog/lewr...ml#more-122320

    After reportedly getting into two drunken altercations on the evening of September 21, 50-year-old Antony Jon Jackson was taken to a detox center in Duluth, Minnesota. Officer Richard Jouppi and his partner were dispatched to Jackson’s home to take him to the facility. When they arrived, the intoxicated man was in a wheelchair.

    As he was being processed at the facility, Jackson was surly and uncooperative. Surveillance video captured him making vaguely hostile statements about owning guns. The female staffer, who obviously deals with intoxicated people on a regular basis, didn’t appear particularly threatened by Jackson. Jouppi’s body language conveyed impatient disgust and growing hostility.

    When the staffer told Jackson to take off his coat, the inebriated middle-aged man blurted something about “throwing” it at her.

    “Throw it at me, and see what happens,” replied the young woman, who obviously didn’t take the drunk’s bluster seriously. As Jackson gathered the jacket to throw it, Jouppi closed in, grabbed the smaller man’s right wrist in a control hold, and pulled his arm back behind his head. This had the predictable — and, most likely, intended — effect of provoking Jackson to swipe pitifully at Jouppi’s face. Jouppi retaliated by slugging Jackson — who was, once again, in a wheelchair — at least four times. The heroic officer then threw Jackson face-down on the floor before mounting him.

    “No! Dude!” exclaimed the female staffer.

    “Shut up — back up, or I’ll arrest you, too!” hissed Jouppi as he began to handcuff the victim. Feeling the weight of the staffer’s disapproval, or perhaps the residue of what was once his conscience, Jouppi immediately tried to rationalize his actions. “You don’t think people in a wheelchair can assault people?” he said to her. “Turns out he just did.”

    Jouppi’s female partner, not having the strength of character displayed by Officer Regina Tasca in a very similar situation, stood quietly in the corner as the assault unfolded.

    “You get in two fights in one night, and then you assault the cops? You can rot!” Jouppi taunted his victim. “For a man who claims to be so injured he can’t do anything, you really don’t have to be such an a**hole.”

    In his official report, Jouppi whined that Jackson’s feeble swat at his face — which was, once again, a response to having his arm painfully wrenched behind his neck, “caused me to feel pain. I sought to take Jackson into custody and delivered two strikes to Jackson’s face as it was the only target presented to me at the time and in order to keep him from delivering more strikes.”

    From this account, Jackson was a formidable pugilist — a veritable Bas Rutten, rather than a skinny, sickly, drunken, helpless 50-year-old man in a wheelchair. Police union attorney Fredric Bruno insists that Jackson “punched” Jouppi and that his threat to throw his jacket was “terroristic” in nature. (That description is more accurately applied to Jouppi's threat to kidnap the female staffer after she complained about the beating he had inflicted on Jackson.)

    Because his unhallowed hand had touched the sanctified personage of Officer Jouppi, Jackson was originally charged with felony assault. That charge was dropped after the prosecutor reviewed the video. Jouppi — whose disciplinary problems and misconduct had resulted in a “Final and Last Chance Agreement” with the department last March — may be charged with fifth-degree misdemeanor assault for repeatedly slugging a man in a wheelchair.

    Officer Jouppi, incidentally, is listed as an advisor to Duluth’s affiliate of the Police Explorers program.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mport1 View Post
    Wow, terrible idea. Violence is not the answer. We must educate the population about liberty and use nonviolent means like civil disobedience and noncompliance.
    And when the state puts, or is going to put, a gun to your head and blow your brains out for failure to comply?

    What then?

  27. #26
    "Without Love In The Dream It'll Never Come True" Jerry Garcia

  28. #27
    "Without Love In The Dream It'll Never Come True" Jerry Garcia

  29. #28
    "Without Love In The Dream It'll Never Come True" Jerry Garcia

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelwise View Post
    I want to see people taking their guns out and blowing those rogue cop fucks away.

    The American people have to start sticking up for each other like this.

    How else are these rogue cops going to learn their lesson?

    My neighbor winged one, but he got away.

    https://axiomamuse.wordpress.com/tag/fred-ensminger/

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anti Federalist View Post
    And when the state puts, or is going to put, a gun to your head and blow your brains out for failure to comply?

    What then?
    I think using retaliatory violence against the state should only be considered in instances in which your life is in immediate, imminent danger. Even then, it isn't likely to solve any problems but may just spare you some time.

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