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Thread: Free market impact on third-world countries

  1. #31
    Member KerriAnn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gold Standard View Post
    Ok, now that I'm not at work I can think about this a little more in depth.



    In your example you are looking in the wrong places to place blame. First of all, everyone wants to buy the best product for the cheapest price, and there is no reason to ever stop a company or person from doing so. Cheap cocoa beans do not cause slavery. If the price of cocoa beans tripled tomorrow, those people will still be slaves, because they do not understand their rights or do not protect them. Slavery is a violation of property rights. If property rights are not protected, then you can never have a free market and never have real prosperity. It is a sad situation, but they have to make the necessary changes to protect their rights. Preventing companies from buying their cocoa beans will not solve any part of the problem.

    As far as the main question, how would a free market in the U.S. affect trade with these countries? To take your prior example further, what would happen in the chocolate industry? There would be no tariffs on imported cocoa, the cost of shipping will stabilize once oil is purchased in gold or silver instead of Federal Reserve notes, there would be no minimum wage laws to price workers out of the labor market, there would be no endless government unemployment benefits to discourage workers from taking jobs, etc. All of these things will lower the input costs for chocolate makers. There also would not be FDA regulations among others pricing competitors out of starting their own chocolate companies. You would have numerous new chocolate companies pop up driving down the price and mazimizing the quality of finished chocolate products. So setting aside the rights violations by the cocoa farmers, the cocoa beans they export will now result in an abundance of chocolate products to choose from at a lower cost available for the African people to import.

    Here is are a couple of good links about free trade:

    http://mises.org/daily/1429

    http://mises.org/media/1874/Five-Mos...national-Trade

    Now a free market here would have these benefits in every industry. Even if nominal wages fall, prices would fall faster, making everyone wealthier. You wouldn't have our current monetary policy discouraging savings and therefore relying on inflation to drive misdirected capital investment. You would have real savings and business cycles would be minimal or nonexistent (assuming bankers that can't redeem customer deposits are prosecuted for fraud instead of bailed out). We would be producing like it was 1922 again, flooding the world with high quality low cost products like we did back when we had some semblance of sound money. This would definitely raise the standard of living of every country. How much it raises that standard of living depends on the policies and systems of government in each of those countries though.
    Excellent! This is the type of stuff I'm looking for! I almost feel bad, like you did my homework for me.
    I really appreciate your input, I can do some research now to build on some of your ideas and I think I will have a solid paper.

    I will also be including some analyzing of the role of these middle-men, and how they are a product of the laws that restrict transporting children over state lines. Seeing as how the law enforcement agencies do not have the resources to uphold these laws, and many of them are corrupt anyway, the laws do nothing but create a racket for the law enforcement and the middle-men so they can exploit the farmers. (Thank you Proph).



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  3. #32

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    Mises Institute is a good source. Here is a jazzed up version of Tom Wood's argument on the subject of child labor.

    "Time is catching up with me." -Ron Paul

  4. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by KerriAnn View Post
    I wish I could, but the book I am assigned to "critically" respond to is all about the child slavery issues connected to cocoa production. The author provides no explicit solutions to the problem, so I am attempting to provide a step towards a solution.
    The book is called Bitter Chocolate by Carol Off.
    I don't know how well this argument will work. Free market reforms here and free trade can potentially increase the standard of living in those countries, but only if their masters allow them enjoy those benefits. I don't know of any "solution" to the problem short of volunteering to go over there with a rifle and free the slaves and teach them how to protect their rights, unless you want us to invade and occupy them which just creates a whole new set of problems.

  5. #34
    Member KerriAnn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simple View Post
    Mises Institute is a good source. Here is a jazzed up version of Tom Wood's argument on the subject of child labor.

    Thanks. This video provides a good basis for my argument.
    I could have done without the effects though, I thought I was having an acid flashback for a second, very distracting!

  6. #35

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    bump for very interesting "stuff"
    So you gave up on this:
    H
    elp with documenting voting rights violations and election fraud abuses!?
    Shame. Nothing encourages crime than not punishing it. You are letting them get away with it.FAIL.


    Quote Originally Posted by orenbus View Post
    If I had to answer this question truthfully I'd probably piss a lot of people off lol, Barrex would be a better person to ask he doesn't seem to care lol.


  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by KerriAnn View Post
    Thanks. This video provides a good basis for my argument.
    I could have done without the effects though, I thought I was having an acid flashback for a second, very distracting!
    This comes from his speech "Applying Economics to American History" http://mises.org/media/4260/Applying...erican-History

    The whole thing is very good. The part about child labor is in the first 15 minutes, if you want to hear it in context.

    You also might want to think about the flip side of the argument: How do unfree markets in the US harm third world countries? High import tariffs or quotas would prevent Americans from buying products exported from those countries. That prevents the third world country from having income with which to trade for other goods.
    "Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem."
    Ronald Reagan, 1981

  8. #37
    Lone Coyote ClydeCoulter's Avatar
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    Bump, KerriAnn will be posting her paper after she has completed it for feedback......
    More input, need input, bleep, bleep

  9. #38
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    Careful. Some teachers take a sentence or phrase from papers, put it in quotes, and search google to look for plagiarism.
    "Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem."
    Ronald Reagan, 1981

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