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Thread: Well water muddy this morning. Some knowledge on the matter but more is better.

  1. #1

    Default Well water muddy this morning. Some knowledge on the matter but more is better.

    So this morning I woke up to muddy well water.

    Used more than the usual amount last night. Claw foot bath instead of shower. Ran clear. Don't think usage was the problem.
    All week had rains in the evening. Last night was a real soaker all night long.

    So first thing I do is run some water from the spigot at the pump. After about 30 gallons water became clear (er). However, there would be 'kicks' from the hose. Then get a little of the muddy before running clear again. Then after about another 30 gallons clear(er) water which I have at present. Not 100% but much better than before.

    Now this leads me to two possibilities. One is that there may have been a partial collapse causing the well to muddy and that it is now clearing up as I pull water from it. Second would be the possibility that there is a crack in the casing.

    Next two days are supposed to be clear weather so am gonna continue testing it as the weather dries.

    Anyways, just putting this out there.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.



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  3. #2

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    The kicks in the hose sound like air is in the system.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZanZibar View Post
    The kicks in the hose sound like air is in the system.
    Yeah, gonna be investigating this a bit more. I bled it through a hundred foot hose so there is a possibility that the 'burps' were do to that.

    As far as the water it is now clear having 'bled' the line. We had 2.5 inches of water in the last three days with one inch falling overnight so I am pretty sure that this was the contributor.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  5. #4
    Member Tonewah's Avatar
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    Sounds like a bad foot valve. When the pump cuts off, the foot valve is supposed to keep water in the line. When it fails, the water drops all the way back into the water table, stirring up debris. When the pump turns back on, the debris is pumped up the line. If you continue to run the water, the pump will stay on until the water is clear. When the pump shuts off again, the debris will be kicked up again.

    If that's your issue, to fix it, you can put a check valve in the line above ground or pull out the pump and replace the foot valve. If you don't fix it, you could damage your pump.
    It's R[̲̅ə̲̅٨̲̅٥̲̅٦̲̅]UTION time!

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonewah View Post
    Sounds like a bad foot valve. When the pump cuts off, the foot valve is supposed to keep water in the line. When it fails, the water drops all the way back into the water table, stirring up debris. When the pump turns back on, the debris is pumped up the line. If you continue to run the water, the pump will stay on until the water is clear. When the pump shuts off again, the debris will be kicked up again.

    If that's your issue, to fix it, you can put a check valve in the line above ground or pull out the pump and replace the foot valve. If you don't fix it, you could damage your pump.
    Thanks Tonewah. That is sound advise. I don't think that is the case on this well. There is a spigot at the well and there is no delay when opening the faucet. I would think that if I am losing water down the line then there should be some delay.
    Still, very good advise to others that may have the same problem. There could be many causes. Your suggestion being one of them for sure.
    As of this morning the water is running clear none stop. I am pretty sure it had to do with the amount of rain. We had 2.5 inches in the last couple of days a bit over an inch yesterday and soaking rains for over a week.
    Still I will monitor it over the next couple of days.
    Thanks again and dependent on what happens over the next couple of days I will take this advise into account.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  7. #6

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    Surface rain should have no effect on a properly sealed well until the aquifer recharges several days later. Muddy water after rain could be due to water seeping down the outside of the casing (annular space) through the grout seal if the grout seal has been damaged; tractor bumping it, etc. It is also possible there is a leak in the piping between the well head and the spigot, or between the spigot and the pressure tank. Its possible if the aquifer is at an all time high, the water has washed the insides clean and that is where your turbidity came from.

    Is this a submersible pump, shallow well pump (less than 30 feet to water with above ground pump and single line) or deep well pump surface pump w/ 2 lines (one push one pull)? How old is the well casing? How deep to water level? How deep to bottom of well? How far from the well head is the spigot? How far is the pressure tank? Is the pressure tank buried or above ground? When is the last time the system was repaired? What was the nature of the repair? What type of piping connects these elements? HDPE with stainless hose clamps? Could be as simple as a loose hose clamp. Check valve before pressure tank? Anything else in the water besides turbidity? Black specks? What about the casing what's it made of, how far does it stick above ground level? How often does this happen? How often does it rain like it has?

    Any time a well gets cloudy you should get it tested for bacteria or shock it to be safe.

    the more you give the more I can give back,

    presence
    Last edited by presence; 04-01-2012 at 08:13 AM.
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  8. #7

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    Thanks for responding presence.

    Unfortunately, I can't give you much info on the well as it is a gf's and she tapped into the existing well of the squatters she eventually threw off the property.

    I think you pegged it when you said..

    Its possible if the aquifer is at an all time high, the water has washed the insides clean and that is where your turbidity came from.
    It has run clear for over a week now. The rains we had were extended and out of the normal with a heavy rain the day and evening before the turbidity.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  9. #8

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    Here's how I sanitize a well:

    Set aside water to flush toilets and live life for evening and following morning.
    Turn off hot water tank

    Take off well cap
    Use mason line and window weight (12" rebar with hole drilled in it, a bolt, etc.) to determine depth of well and depth to water.
    Listen for "ploop" and then pull up to measure.
    Then drop below surface and lower until the weight to stops pulling, pull up and measure
    Double over the line a few times to make easier to measure, then multiply.
    Subtract to determine number of feet of standing water column from bottom of well.
    1/2 Gallon Unscented, Non Ultra, Plain Bleach per 100' (OF WATER) in 6" pipe = 200 ppm (minimum recommended shock)

    Pour bleach so it soaks interior of well casing.
    Circulate water into top of well with a garden hose for 1-2 hours
    Check hose water for strong bleach smell, if not, let pump rest 1/2 hour then give it 1-2 more hours of run time.
    Cycle until you smell STRONG bleach smell out of hose.
    It may take up to 4+ hours of circulation depending upon water volume, pump pressure, and hose diameter.
    In 6" pipe, there's about 1.5 gallons per foot of standing water column you need to circulate out.
    Consider the 1/2 hour shower you get out of a 40 gallon hot water tank, be patient, don't overwork pump.

    Use bleach water hose to soak interior and exterior of well casing.
    Wash well cap thoroughly.
    Turn off the hose. Replace well cap.
    Make sure there is a silicone seal between cap flange and casing.
    Inspect breather filter on well cap (if any).
    Make sure casing is sticking minimum 18" out of ground, adjust grade near casing if necessary.

    1 by 1 turn on every cold faucet until you smell bleach at each. Don't forget exterior spigots.
    Turn on the hot water at furthest location and let run until bleach smell is strong.
    1 by 1 turn on every hot faucet until you smell bleach at each.
    Go back and check each location for strong bleach smell on both hot and cold.
    Clean out back of each toilet, then pour 1/4 cup extra bleach in the back of each toilet and swirl
    After all pipes are full of solution, clean each sink, and faucet with bleach water solution.
    Don't forget hydrant, clothes washer, refrigerator, dishwasher, and other odd supply lines.
    Soak faucet aerators and shower heads in vinegar solution overnight for good measure.

    Let everything stand ideally 12-24 hours (overnight).
    If you intend to do less than 12 hours, then double concentration to 400 ppm (1 gallon per 100')
    If you don't want to measure depth, just add 4 gallons which protects 400' x 6" of water at min 400 ppm.
    But note, using too much bleach can damage plumbing fittings, pump, well tank, and valves.
    Using too little is ineffective. I suspect 1000+ ppm could bind a pump over 48 hours.

    Following morning let water run in hose, on ground, some place where it won't make a muddy mess.
    It will take about 4+ hours to run clean
    Give well pump a rest every hour.
    After water runs clean, go to hot and cold at each faucet, and make them run clean too.
    Use water for washing hands/dishes only the first day, let water run plenty, don't over work pump.
    Let everything settle the following night, next morning: Drink!

    You're looking at 6 hours one evening and 6 hours the following morning to do things correctly.
    Morning work is really just turning the hose on and off.

    If your well has been unsanitary for a long time or flooded, I recommend 400 ppm and repeat shock chlorination in 2 weeks.
    Some plumbers recommend 200 ppm chlorination annually.
    bloat/gas is the first sign of tainted water.
    Have your water tested.

    Just pour a bunch of bleach in there, stir it up, get it to all your faucets, clean everything nice, let it sit, rinse it out, call it done.


    "Plumbers protect the health of the nation"
    It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen
    to set brush fires in peoples minds! Revolution is Action upon Revelation!

    The small green parakeet, Tito, was flung helplessly from the cage, landing on the floor. When a girl screamed, the officer sneerd:
    "F*** THE BIRD !!!"
    ...and stomped on it with his jackboot. READ MORE: http://www.policestateusa.com/2013/n...lugo-parakeet/


  10. #9

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    Good, well presented, advise right there. A 'well' deserved + rep.

    I had wanted to give it a cleaning, but decided to wait a week to see how things worked out. So, it seems it is time to "get 'er done." I'll also add to your above list running a few cycles through the ice maker and changing the refrigerator filter. Thanks again. I hope others on a well are reading this post and decide to do a maintenance cleaning themselves.
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

  11. #10
    Needs a bigger boat Anti Federalist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    Good, well presented, advise right there. A 'well' deserved + rep.

    I had wanted to give it a cleaning, but decided to wait a week to see how things worked out. So, it seems it is time to "get 'er done." I'll also add to your above list running a few cycles through the ice maker and changing the refrigerator filter. Thanks again. I hope others on a well are reading this post and decide to do a maintenance cleaning themselves.
    Agreed, he gave "well" vetted advice.

    +rep

  12. #11

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    Also consider,,
    If the pump losses pressure (power, valve, leak) it can back flush into the well, and stir up stuff (mud).

    I may take just a little time and running to flush out the lines.
    And watch to see if it happens again.
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  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcosmar View Post
    Also consider,,
    If the pump losses pressure (power, valve, leak) it can back flush into the well, and stir up stuff (mud).

    I may take just a little time and running to flush out the lines.
    And watch to see if it happens again.
    This could have also been one of many possibilities, Peter. As things now stand it looks as if it was just a risen aquifer. Something others should definitely consider if they have the same troubles. Thanks for your input!
    Something, something, something...Whatever my rage for the day.

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    Sorry for your problems Phil , but this has been a pretty good trouble shooting guide for the future for me . If I can remember where to find it when I need it .

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    Member donnay's Avatar
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    I was looking for ways to clean out well and lines without bleach...(I am still looking) but I came across this info that may be helpful...

    http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/ageng/irrigate/ae97w.htm

    ETA:
    I am wondering...I hate bleach, and wondering can you flush your well better with distilled white vinegar? White vinegar is known to kill 99% of bacteria, 82% of mold, 80% of germs and viruses, and it is not as harsh as chlorine.
    Last edited by donnay; 04-02-2012 at 12:01 PM.
    *Legal Disclaimer: While I am a keen researcher and want nothing more than to help people, I am not a doctor and more importantly, I am not your doctor. Any article I post that contains general information about medical conditions, treatments and remedies is to bring awareness. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. You should never delay seeking medical advice, or discontinue any medical treatment because of information in an article I have posted. The only advice I would give is to continue to research further and use discernment with all advice.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by donnay View Post
    I am wondering...I hate bleach, and wondering can you flush your well better with distilled white vinegar? White vinegar is known to kill 99% of bacteria, 82% of mold, 80% of germs and viruses, and it is not as harsh as chlorine.
    Vinegar has these properties because of its pH. When you water it down it doesn't have extremely low pH any more. I don't like bleach for much either, but when I shock my well I use it... or if I slaughter an animal... I clean up with it. Other than that it has little use to me. I wouldn't trust a well after a vilnegar shock as vinegar itself has a pH of 4.5 but any dilution thereof does not. Maybe a heavy citric acid shock... but I would test to see that what's coming out of the well was brought to below 4. It would probably be expensive relative to bleach. Citric acid comes in crystalline form for about $15/ dry pint. You'd be out in the world of experimentation... everyone else in the world uses chlorine. Another option might be strong H202. Both should be available from your local hydroponic shop or online. I have no dosage recommendations.
    Last edited by presence; 04-06-2012 at 07:51 AM.
    It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen
    to set brush fires in peoples minds! Revolution is Action upon Revelation!

    The small green parakeet, Tito, was flung helplessly from the cage, landing on the floor. When a girl screamed, the officer sneerd:
    "F*** THE BIRD !!!"
    ...and stomped on it with his jackboot. READ MORE: http://www.policestateusa.com/2013/n...lugo-parakeet/






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