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Thread: Intercity Passenger Rail

  1. #631



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  3. #632

  4. #633

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    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 06-16-2017 at 07:37 PM.

  5. #634

  6. #635

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    Former C&O 2-6-6-2 Baldwin compound, now WMSR 1309 is nearing completion of a full restoration effort with an expected operating lifespan of over 50 years.

    They look for it to be in service on 1 July 2017.

    Tickets can be purchased here: https://public.whistletix.com/WMSR/Events/293388

    It will be, once operational, the last surviving commercially built Baldwin locomotive for a US railroad and the largest operating steam locomotive in the world.

    https://www.facebook.com/Wmsrsteam/


  7. #636

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    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 06-16-2017 at 09:15 PM.

  8. #637

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    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 06-16-2017 at 09:17 PM.

  9. #638

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    I miss talking trains with acptulsa...where did he go?

  10. #639

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    From Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain.


    We have come five hundred miles by rail through the heart of France.
    What a bewitching land it is! What a garden! Surely the leagues of
    bright green lawns are swept and brushed and watered every day and their
    grasses trimmed by the barber. Surely the hedges are shaped and measured
    and their symmetry preserved by the most architectural of gardeners.
    Surely the long straight rows of stately poplars that divide the
    beautiful landscape like the squares of a checker-board are set with line
    and plummet, and their uniform height determined with a spirit level.
    Surely the straight, smooth, pure white turnpikes are jack-planed and
    sandpapered every day. How else are these marvels of symmetry,
    cleanliness, and order attained? It is wonderful. There are no
    unsightly stone walls and never a fence of any kind. There is no dirt,
    no decay, no rubbish anywhere--nothing that even hints at untidiness
    --nothing that ever suggests neglect. All is orderly and beautiful--every
    thing is charming to the eye.

    We had such glimpses of the Rhone gliding along between its grassy banks;
    of cosy cottages buried in flowers and shrubbery; of quaint old red-tiled
    villages with mossy medieval cathedrals looming out of their midst; of
    wooded hills with ivy-grown towers and turrets of feudal castles
    projecting above the foliage; such glimpses of Paradise, it seemed to us,
    such visions of fabled fairyland!

    We knew then what the poet meant when he sang of: “--thy cornfields
    green, and sunny vines, O pleasant land of France!”

    And it is a pleasant land. No word describes it so felicitously as that
    one. They say there is no word for “home” in the French language. Well,
    considering that they have the article itself in such an attractive
    aspect, they ought to manage to get along without the word. Let us not
    waste too much pity on “homeless” France. I have observed that Frenchmen
    abroad seldom wholly give up the idea of going back to France some time
    or other. I am not surprised at it now.

    We are not infatuated with these French railway cars, though. We took
    first-class passage, not because we wished to attract attention by doing
    a thing which is uncommon in Europe but because we could make our journey
    quicker by so doing. It is hard to make railroading pleasant in any
    country. It is too tedious. Stagecoaching is infinitely more
    delightful. Once I crossed the plains and deserts and mountains of the
    West in a stagecoach, from the Missouri line to California, and since
    then all my pleasure trips must be measured to that rare holiday frolic.
    Two thousand miles of ceaseless rush and rattle and clatter, by night and
    by day, and never a weary moment, never a lapse of interest! The first
    seven hundred miles a level continent, its grassy carpet greener and
    softer and smoother than any sea and figured with designs fitted to its
    magnitude--the shadows of the clouds. Here were no scenes but summer
    scenes, and no disposition inspired by them but to lie at full length on
    the mail sacks in the grateful breeze and dreamily smoke the pipe of
    peace--what other, where all was repose and contentment? In cool
    mornings, before the sun was fairly up, it was worth a lifetime of city
    toiling and moiling to perch in the foretop with the driver and see the
    six mustangs scamper under the sharp snapping of the whip that never
    touched them; to scan the blue distances of a world that knew no lords
    but us; to cleave the wind with uncovered head and feel the sluggish
    pulses rousing to the spirit of a speed that pretended to the resistless
    rush of a typhoon! Then thirteen hundred miles of desert solitudes; of
    limitless panoramas of bewildering perspective; of mimic cities, of
    pinnacled cathedrals, of massive fortresses, counterfeited in the eternal
    rocks and splendid with the crimson and gold of the setting sun; of dizzy
    altitudes among fog-wreathed peaks and never-melting snows, where
    thunders and lightnings and tempests warred magnificently at our feet and
    the storm clouds above swung their shredded banners in our very faces!
    But I forgot. I am in elegant France now, and not scurrying through the
    great South Pass and the Wind River Mountains, among antelopes and
    buffaloes and painted Indians on the warpath. It is not meet that I
    should make too disparaging comparisons between humdrum travel on a
    railway and that royal summer flight across a continent in a stagecoach.
    I meant in the beginning to say that railway journeying is tedious and
    tiresome, and so it is--though at the time I was thinking particularly of
    a dismal fifty-hour pilgrimage between New York and St. Louis. Of course
    our trip through France was not really tedious because all its scenes and
    experiences were new and strange; but as Dan says, it had its
    “discrepancies.”

    The cars are built in compartments that hold eight persons each. Each
    compartment is partially subdivided, and so there are two tolerably
    distinct parties of four in it. Four face the other four. The seats and
    backs are thickly padded and cushioned and are very comfortable; you can
    smoke if you wish; there are no bothersome peddlers; you are saved the
    infliction of a multitude of disagreeable fellow passengers. So far, so
    well. But then the conductor locks you in when the train starts; there
    is no water to drink in the car; there is no heating apparatus for night
    travel; if a drunken rowdy should get in, you could not remove a matter
    of twenty seats from him or enter another car; but above all, if you are
    worn out and must sleep, you must sit up and do it in naps, with cramped
    legs and in a torturing misery that leaves you withered and lifeless the
    next day--for behold they have not that culmination of all charity and
    human kindness, a sleeping car, in all France. I prefer the American
    system. It has not so many grievous “discrepancies.”

    In France, all is clockwork, all is order. They make no mistakes. Every
    third man wears a uniform, and whether he be a marshal of the empire or a
    brakeman, he is ready and perfectly willing to answer all your questions
    with tireless politeness, ready to tell you which car to take, yea, and
    ready to go and put you into it to make sure that you shall not go
    astray. You cannot pass into the waiting room of the depot till you have
    secured your ticket, and you cannot pass from its only exit till the
    train is at its threshold to receive you. Once on board, the train will
    not start till your ticket has been examined--till every passenger’s
    ticket has been inspected. This is chiefly for your own good. If by any
    possibility you have managed to take the wrong train, you will be handed
    over to a polite official who will take you whither you belong and bestow
    you with many an affable bow. Your ticket will be inspected every now
    and then along the route, and when it is time to change cars you will
    know it. You are in the hands of officials who zealously study your
    welfare and your interest, instead of turning their talents to the
    invention of new methods of discommoding and snubbing you, as is very
    often the main employment of that exceedingly self-satisfied monarch, the
    railroad conductor of America.

  11. #640

  12. #641

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    No reason we could not have something like that, here.

    Luxury trains, similar to luxury cruises.

    All that needs to happen is for the fedgov to get out of the railroad business and dissolve Anthrax.

    Luxury on the rails in train-mad Japan

    http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...-japan-8955058

    TOKYO: Japan's latest super-deluxe train left the station Saturday (Jun 17) with a select group of passengers who paid thousands of dollars for a leisurely trip harking back to an era of Art Deco opulence and a slower pace of life.

    The Twilight Express Mizukaze departed Osaka on its maiden trip with around 30 well-heeled passengers on a journey to the far reaches of Japan's main island.

    A couple staying in the 10-car train's top room, The Suite, paid out a combined 2.4 million yen ($22,000) for a two-night, three-day return trip that rolls past emerald green rice paddies, craggy coastlines and ancient shrines.

    That eye-popping price tag gets you five-star hotel luxury including a marble-floored bathroom with claw-legged tub in the priciest suite, food prepared by gourmet chefs, and sumptuous lounges where you can sip cocktails as you take in the dramatic scenery through huge viewing windows.






  13. #642

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Fr...ble_car_system


    The San Francisco cable car system is the world's last manually operated cable car system. An icon of San Francisco, the cable car system forms part of the intermodal urban transport network operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. Of the 23 lines established between 1873 and 1890,[7] only three remain (one of which combines parts of two earlier lines): two routes from downtown near Union Square to Fisherman's Wharf, and a third route along California Street. While the cable cars are used to a certain extent by commuters, the vast majority of their 7 million annual passengers are tourists.[8] They are among the most significant tourist attractions in the city, along with Alcatraz Island, the Golden Gate Bridge, and Fisherman's Wharf. The cable cars are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[4]

    The cable cars are not to be confused with San Francisco's heritage streetcars, which operate on Market Street and the Embarcadero.
    - SUPPORT FREE TRADE, SMUGGLE -

    2 + 2 = 5.

  14. #643

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    Boo hoo.

    About damn time...if we get the FedGov out of long distance train travel, we might be able to re-invigorate the service by offering "land cruises".

    Nobody travels by ship to "get somewhere" and travel by train to "get somewhere" at least in the US, is just as impractical.

    But a luxury "land cruise" by train, that could be a viable business model.


    If Trump has his way, Amtrak’s long-run trains will roll into history

    http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/a...=articlerecirc

    Americans may have a short time left to take a long train ride.

    The Amtrak trains that roll daily from the Bay Area to Chicago, Seattle and Los Angeles — as well as into the imaginations of the traveling public — might soon be rolling to the scrapyard instead.

    Federal budget cutters once again have their eyes on long-distance Amtrak trains — the ones with bud vases in the dining car and picture windows in the lounge. If the Trump administration has its way, Amtrak will lose about half of its $1.4 billion budget and be forced next year to bump off all its long-distance runs, eliminating service to 23 states, primarily in the West and the South. Short-haul commuter lines such as the Capitol Corridor trains to Sacramento would be all that’s left.

    Although Amtrak patronage was higher than ever last year, with 31.3 million passengers carried, President Trump’s budget cutters say long-distance trains carried only 15 percent of those riders.

    The administration said its proposed budget for 2018 would redirect federal subsidies so Amtrak could “focus resources on the parts of the passenger rail system that provide meaningful transportation options within regions.” It said long-distance trains “have long been inefficient and incur the vast majority of Amtrak’s operating losses.”

    Those operating losses totaled $227 million in fiscal 2016, Amtrak says.

    Eliminating long-distance trains “would allow Amtrak to focus on better managing its state-supported and Northeast corridor train services,” the administration said. State-supported trains include California’s Capitol Corridor, San Joaquin and Pacific Surfliner lines, which are funded largely by Caltrans.

    The proposed Amtrak cuts would end funding for 15 trains serving 220 cities. Gone would be the Sunset Limited (Los Angeles to New Orleans), the Lake Shore Limited (New York to Chicago) and the Empire Builder (Seattle to Chicago). Saying “Good night, America” for the last time would be the City of New Orleans, of Arlo Guthrie hit fame.

    California would lose the Coast Starlight, which runs through the Bay Area twice daily on its way between Seattle and Los Angeles, and the California Zephyr, which departs every morning from Emeryville over the Sierra Nevada and the Rockies and on to Chicago.

    At the Emeryville depot, passengers awaiting the departure of the diesel-powered leviathans were wailing like locomotive whistles at a grade crossing.

    Trump “cuts everything people need, especially poor people,” said Walter McCain of Oakland, hunkered down in the waiting room the other morning. “Trains are a viable alternative to flying, as long as you’re not in a hurry. And there’s no need to be in a hurry. For what?”

    Also not in a hurry were Mike and Marjean O’Neill of Cotati, which was a good thing because it would take them 51 hours to get to Chicago if their train left on time, which, being Amtrak, it didn’t. (The California Zephyr departed 23 minutes late, to allow the dining car crew to finish loading some chickens and the porters to take on bags of linens.)

  15. #644

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    This is the former Santa Fe number 1316, as operated by the Texas State Railroad years ago:



    This is her today:



    So, how did this happen? The sad tale is told here:

    http://ngdiscussion.net/phorum/read....468#msg-267468


    The Texas government decided that the way to preserve the engine was not to preserve it, but to completely replace the boiler. And the way to replace the boiler was not to replace it with an equivalent, according to the same design, the way a restorer would do, or even to get in touch with anyone who knows anything about steam locomotives. Instead, the way to preserve this engine was to get a stationary boiler company (and political contributor, perhaps?) to build a boiler according to their own notions, made of thicker steel which cannot and will not expand and contract the same way, and tears itself apart every time it heats up or cools down.

    And when throwing money at it hand over fist doesn't work out so well, to just leave the chassis rotting in the weather for a decade, because some taxpayers might get mad if they throw even more money at it. Besides, the Texas legislators already got their kickbacks from the boilermaker; who cares what happens to it now?

    This is government. This is your irreplaceable heritage in the hands of a government. Any questions?
    Last edited by acptulsa; 07-28-2017 at 02:45 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Douglas Adams
    'An SEP is something we can't see, or don't see, or our brain doesn't let us see, because we think that it's somebody else's problem. Thatís what SEP means. Somebody Elseís Problem. The brain just edits it out, it's like a blind spot.'
    This government is Not Somebody Else's Problem

  16. #645

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    This is the former Santa Fe number 1316, as operated by the Texas State Railroad years ago:



    This is her today:



    So, how did this happen? The sad tale is told here:

    http://ngdiscussion.net/phorum/read....468#msg-267468


    The Texas government decided that the way to preserve the engine was not to preserve it, but to completely replace the boiler. And the way to replace the boiler was not to replace it with an equivalent, according to the same design, the way a restorer would do, or even to get in touch with anyone who knows anything about steam locomotives. Instead, the way to preserve this engine was to get a stationary boiler company (and political contributor, perhaps?) to build a boiler according to their own notions, made of thicker steel which cannot and will not expand and contract the same way, and tears itself apart every time it heats up or cools down.

    And when throwing money at it hand over fist doesn't work out so well, to just leave the chassis rotting in the weather for a decade, because some taxpayers might get mad if they throw even more money at it. Besides, they already got their kickbacks from the boilermaker; who cares what happens to it now?

    This is government. This is your irreplaceable heritage in the hands of a government. Any questions?
    So that's what happened to the Hootervile Canonball?
    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

  17. #646

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by acptulsa View Post
    The Texas government decided that the way to preserve the engine was not to preserve it, but to completely replace the boiler. And the way to replace the boiler was not to replace it with an equivalent, according to the same design, the way a restorer would do, or even to get in touch with anyone who knows anything about steam locomotives. Instead, the way to preserve this engine was to get a stationary boiler company (and political contributor, perhaps?) to build a boiler according to their own notions, made of thicker steel which cannot and will not expand and contract the same way, and tears itself apart every time it heats up or cools down.

    And when throwing money at it hand over fist doesn't work out so well, to just leave the chassis rotting in the weather for a decade, because some taxpayers might get mad if they throw even more money at it. Besides, the Texas legislators already got their kickbacks from the boilermaker; who cares what happens to it now?

    This is government. This is your irreplaceable heritage in the hands of a government. Any questions?
    Ugh, assenholes.

    Here's how an all volunteer force, with donations only, are building two new boilers from scratch for pennies on the dollar of what gov. spent and in months rather than years.

    https://www.facebook.com/wwandf21cam...MELINE&fref=nf



    That's a home built cold flanging machine by the way.



    Last edited by Anti Federalist; 07-28-2017 at 04:12 PM.

  18. #647

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsmyth View Post
    So that's what happened to the Hootervile Canonball?
    No, the Prescott & Arizona Central/Sierra #3 fared much better--thanks to Clint Eastwood taking her restoration out of state government hands and making it a private, voluntary effort.

    Most of this stuff is unnecessary, and is happening because of overly stringent federal boiler regulations. A locomotive could stay active despite an old boiler with no more modification than a safety valve which pops off at lower pressure, with perfect safety. Their firemen could actually (gasp) be trusted to operate them at that lower pressure, and they could remain completely original, were it not for one-size-fits-none, idiot-proofing-for-all federal regulations. They wouldn't be as capable as they were when new, but excursion locomotives are seldom pushed to full capacity anyway.
    Last edited by acptulsa; 07-28-2017 at 05:30 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Douglas Adams
    'An SEP is something we can't see, or don't see, or our brain doesn't let us see, because we think that it's somebody else's problem. Thatís what SEP means. Somebody Elseís Problem. The brain just edits it out, it's like a blind spot.'
    This government is Not Somebody Else's Problem

  19. #648

    Default

    On the same property of the WW & F is Maine Locomotive Works.

    They did the FRA overhaul on Monson #3 and are currently building the boiler for Bridgton and Saco River number 7.

    https://www.facebook.com/BridgtonSac...ngine7Rebuild/



    They also are working on a 2 ft Henschel.

  20. #649

    Default

    For those who don't know, here's what acptulsa is talking about:

    This is the inside of Santa Fe Steam Railroad locomotive #2926's boiler just completing restoration and inspection.

    This void area is full of water, rapidly boiling and creating pressure. All those rods are "staybolts" that hold the inner firebox together, keeping it's shape from distorting due to the intense heat and pressure. This is a "fire tube" boiler, as the fire from the firebox is drafted through the tube causing more water to boil, and steam, which collects at the top of the entire vessel to be drawn off and sent to the drive cylinders.

    There must be an allowance for expansion and contraction throughout the structure, due to the wildly variable load conditions.

    That is what was engineered out of the state bought boilers.





    https://www.facebook.com/NMSX2926/ph...type=3&theater

  21. #650

    Default

    Meanwhile back in Maine, on the full size front:

    https://www.facebook.com/NewEnglandSteam

    Restoration of MEC 470 continues.

  22. #651

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Douglas Adams
    'An SEP is something we can't see, or don't see, or our brain doesn't let us see, because we think that it's somebody else's problem. Thatís what SEP means. Somebody Elseís Problem. The brain just edits it out, it's like a blind spot.'
    This government is Not Somebody Else's Problem

  23. #652

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Douglas Adams
    'An SEP is something we can't see, or don't see, or our brain doesn't let us see, because we think that it's somebody else's problem. Thatís what SEP means. Somebody Elseís Problem. The brain just edits it out, it's like a blind spot.'
    This government is Not Somebody Else's Problem

  24. #653

    Default

    Chinese steam putting on a "spark show" for the photographers.


  25. #654

  26. #655

    Default

    Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    Robert Heinlein

    Give a man an inch and right away he thinks he's a ruler

    Groucho Marx

    I love mankindÖitís people I canít stand.

    Linus, from the Peanuts comic

    You cannot have liberty without morality and morality without faith

    Alexis de Torqueville

    Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Those who learn from the past are condemned to watch everybody else repeat it

    A Zero Hedge comment

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