Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 37

Thread: What would it take to have a completely independent food supply?

  1. #1

    What would it take to have a completely independent food supply?

    A small farm?
    A huge farm?

    Let's say a family of 5 wants to eat ONLY what they grow. Is it possible to grow all of your food, and have a constant food supply year round?

    Anyone with personal experience, ideas, whatever - have at it!
    Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.
    ~Edmund Burke

    Μολὼν λαβέ



  2. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  3. #2
    We did pretty well on this Flat but we needed oil and sugar. We did grow sorghum molasses and made sorghum which turned out awful as our equipment was rusty. Ha
    If you got enough land you can raise wheat, buckwheat barley. Also plenty of potatoes. Plant all kinds of fruit trees. If you want to butcher get a pig. We had three. We also had goats but you need a billy for them and they can be mean. I canned the milk. Yes I would say you could do it if you have a good water supply and your ranch is at least 5 acres, Also if you don't mind simple living

  4. #3
    My mothers parents grew up poor in the rural south and had to take care of a family of five children.
    From what I saw of the families there no single individual was self sufficient. All of course had gardens, chickens, hogs etc.
    However, most all had at least one specialty in which they bartered with their neighbors for things they did not have or could not produce.
    More than trying to be totally self dependent I would look at finding a location that had land, fresh water, pond and most importantly good neighbors. Find out your neighbors needs and fill that gap.

  5. #4
    There are a number of threads in this section with loads of good links for more information.

    I do living history (aka re-enacting) and doing a farm community for a weekend - no electric and water from a well in buckets, a single person can't make it, and a family with 3 or more working is needed. At some point, there is a need for thingd that you can not make yourself due to time or material constraints. Thus the need for a community where there can be some increased efficiency based on various skills the inhabitants have.
    Out of every one hundred men they send us, ten should not even be here. Eighty will do nothing but serve as targets for the enemy. Nine are real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, upon them depends our success in battle. But one, ah the one, he is a real warrior, and he will bring the others back from battle alive.

    Duty is the most sublime word in the English language. Do your duty in all things. You can not do more than your duty. You should never wish to do less than your duty.

  6. #5
    You would have to step back in time a little.
    This is a good start in understanding the old ways.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/New-Complete.../dp/0751364428
    Wow, look at the price on that book now!
    What a difference a year makes.
    This is my dream.

    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    My mothers parents grew up poor in the rural south and had to take care of a family of five children.
    From what I saw of the families there no single individual was self sufficient. All of course had gardens, chickens, hogs etc.
    However, most all had at least one specialty in which they bartered with their neighbors for things they did not have or could not produce.
    More than trying to be totally self dependent I would look at finding a location that had land, fresh water, pond and most importantly good neighbors. Find out your neighbors needs and fill that gap.
    Yes, neighbors are key to the system.
    I also must say that you have to keep it from becoming communal in my opinion. Steer clear of anything that might void property rights and anything that might lead to a what is mine is yours and vice a versa.
    Neighbors are key though, no doubt.
    Barter would go a long way but a sound currency must remain or any system would collapse. You can't be everything to everyman or yourself.

    I started this thread a year back.
    http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthr...light=minifarm
    I had found a piece of land as Phill stated, rural south for a really good price but I have been unable to sell my current home.
    Last edited by Dieseler; 12-03-2009 at 01:40 PM.
    Pandora's box is not only open but its sides have been split with a razor and it now resides in a dumpster.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles View Post
    There are a number of threads in this section with loads of good links for more information.

    - no electric and water from a well in buckets, a single person can't make it, and a family with 3 or more working is needed. At some point, there is a need for thingd that you can not make yourself due to time or material constraints. Thus the need for a community where there can be some increased efficiency based on various skills the inhabitants have.
    The old hermit that used to live by us made it alright but it was tough for him He ate game mostly.

  8. #7
    Well, I definitely see the need to have close friends/neighbors, etc.

    As far as currency goes... I don't know what it'll be next. I doubt it will be gold or silver.
    Does anyone have information on crop yields, or any suggestions on what crops are best (in terms of draining soil and nutritional value)?

    Thanks everyone!
    Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.
    ~Edmund Burke

    Μολὼν λαβέ

  9. #8
    Man, Diesler, they sorely need to reprint that book.
    ================
    Open Borders: A Libertarian Reappraisal or why only dumbasses and cultural marxists are for it.

    Cultural Marxism: The Corruption of America

    The Property Basis of Rights



  10. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  11. #9
    Question - how do you plan to heat your home?

    If you are thinking wood, you might want to look into woodlot management, too.
    Why can't everybody else leave everybody else alone?

  12. #10
    I don't have any real neighbors but I know other people around here trade skills and labor all the time.
    War; everything in the world wrong, evil and immoral combined into one and multiplied by millions.

  13. #11
    One of the Rodale Press gardening sourcebooks I have has the row feet required of the different veggies per person. Not sure which one at the moment - probably the organic gardening one...tho it might be their "stocking up" one.

    Will look and edit when I find it - IF I find it. lol

    edit - found it. It is not row feet required per person, it's the average yield per row feet planted. It has a lot of really good info.

    It's called Rodale's Garden Problem Solver

    http://www.amazon.com/Rodales-Garden.../dp/0875966993
    Last edited by MsDoodahs; 12-03-2009 at 10:26 PM.
    Why can't everybody else leave everybody else alone?

  14. #12
    After you get a vague idea on how to make the plants produce your food,
    Then you have to learn the art of Canning and storage so you can put all of the stuff you grow up and this is where you really pass or fail in the end.
    Keep a cellar in mind for some food storage.
    Also need a cool and absolutely DRY place for some storage and all of the implements to do this and keep your rewards bug free.
    You will need a special building on your place designed for butchering equipped with all of the implements also and a smoke house.
    Self sufficiency ain't easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by LibertyEagle View Post
    Man, Diesler, they sorely need to reprint that book.
    I sure wish someone would. John wrote the best books on the subject.
    Last edited by Dieseler; 12-04-2009 at 01:26 PM.
    Pandora's box is not only open but its sides have been split with a razor and it now resides in a dumpster.

  15. #13
    Before we had electricity I canned everything. Hundreds of quarts of tomatoes, beans corn. I still make my own keg pickles, Jams and sweet dill pickles. I have a cellar but don't go down in it much anymore as there was a rattle snake under the steps. Ha! I cvooked everything on my wood stove. Had a clothes washer that ran on electricity and it was the roller type. I hated it as I knocked off buttons all the time.
    We made a lot of jerky and smoked our ham and bacon. If we shot a bear which was very seldom I canned him too.
    now that we have water power I freeze everything.
    had so much fun and I still love our isolated living.
    Diesler rent your house and move out and do this while you are still young.

  16. #14

    Wow!

    Quote Originally Posted by Meatwasp View Post
    Before we had electricity I canned everything. Hundreds of quarts of tomatoes, beans corn. I still make my own keg pickles, Jams and sweet dill pickles. I have a cellar but don't go down in it much anymore as there was a rattle snake under the steps. Ha! I cvooked everything on my wood stove. Had a clothes washer that ran on electricity and it was the roller type. I hated it as I knocked off buttons all the time.
    We made a lot of jerky and smoked our ham and bacon. If we shot a bear which was very seldom I canned him too.
    now that we have water power I freeze everything.
    had so much fun and I still love our isolated living.
    Diesler rent your house and move out and do this while you are still young.
    Very cool, Meatwasp! I'll bet you are an encyclopedia of self-sufficiency knowledge.

  17. #15

    Good question

    Quote Originally Posted by MsDoodahs View Post
    Question - how do you plan to heat your home?

    If you are thinking wood, you might want to look into woodlot management, too.
    Not a problem for me here in the desert southwest. But in urban areas up north where everyone is dependent on petroleum or natural gas for heat, things would get really ugly really fast if that was unavailable. I imagine something like the winter in Moscow in Dr. Zhivago (the good Doctor's favorite movie). Yikes! Makes me shiver thinking about it.

  18. #16
    Ha I can argue pretty good on how to live the self sufficientry life style. It looks like you are headed that way too Alcala. Keep it up you will never be sorry.



  19. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  20. #17

    washer

    Quote Originally Posted by Meatwasp View Post
    Had a clothes washer that ran on electricity and it was the roller type. I hated it as I knocked off buttons all the time.
    I am thinking of buying an old Maytag that runs on a gasoline engine. Convert it to ethanol or wood gas. But I guess being clean is not as much a priority for me as some other things! Can't die from being stinky!

  21. #18
    One can make enough to trade for everything he needs. I would say just take care of the basics, and perhaps produce one thing in abundance and well, and you will be able to trade for what you want.

    Me? I make mead.

  22. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by tmosley View Post
    One can make enough to trade for everything he needs. I would say just take care of the basics, and perhaps produce one thing in abundance and well, and you will be able to trade for what you want.

    Me? I make mead.
    We have our on line jewelry net and it is doing pretty good so close to Christmas We don't drink anymore but that should be a great trade off. Ha!

  23. #20

    Agree

    Quote Originally Posted by tmosley View Post
    One can make enough to trade for everything he needs. I would say just take care of the basics, and perhaps produce one thing in abundance and well, and you will be able to trade for what you want.

    Me? I make mead.
    I think this is the ultimate strategy. Figure out some service or product you can provide in a localized, near-subsistence economy and use your resources NOW to acquire the tools, materials, and skills needed. Sure, try to be as self-sufficient as possible and stock up on some things, but ultimately be prepared to trade in a local economy for the long haul.

    Mead is a good choice. You can trade it for the honey you will need. Do you keep a yeast culture going?

    Producing honey is another good choice. I am considering starting bee keeping.

  24. #21
    What I found to be helpful with living this lifestyle is not to consider it "work" or a "chore", but to develop an attitude of "existing".
    Self-sufficiency isn't a nine to five job. I dare say that if you only put 8 hours a day into it you probably won't be very self-sufficient.
    Often times it is a before the sun rises until after the sun sets affair. With more hours being spent the more self sufficient you want to be.
    If you plant by the signs then you have to plant by the signs. As much as one day can make a difference.
    However, it can be more rewarding than a 9 to 5 that you could care less about only to come home and self-medicate during all your "free-time", because you hate your 9 to 5.
    It is well worth giving it a go. Though I'm working the 9 to 5 these days I try to keep my free time occupied with projects towards a sense of self-sufficiency, garden etc. only to find out that the 9 to 5 is a major inconvenience to accomplishing some of the goals.

    A coupla books that may help:

    "How to be your own power company" by Jim Cullen

    "Cottage water systems" by Max Burns

    I especially liked the power company book as it allowed for easy lighting in a trailer simply by installing an auxiliary battery in your vehicle and using a 12v
    system.
    Wish they had had these nifty L.E.D. lights back in the day!

  25. #22

    Cullen book

    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    What I found to be helpful with living this lifestyle is not to consider it "work" or a "chore", but to develop an attitude of "existing".
    Self-sufficiency isn't a nine to five job. I dare say that if you only put 8 hours a day into it you probably won't be very self-sufficient.
    Often times it is a before the sun rises until after the sun sets affair. With more hours being spent the more self sufficient you want to be.
    If you plant by the signs then you have to plant by the signs. As much as one day can make a difference.
    However, it can be more rewarding than a 9 to 5 that you could care less about only to come home and self-medicate during all your "free-time", because you hate your 9 to 5.
    It is well worth giving it a go. Though I'm working the 9 to 5 these days I try to keep my free time occupied with projects towards a sense of self-sufficiency, garden etc. only to find out that the 9 to 5 is a major inconvenience to accomplishing some of the goals.

    A coupla books that may help:

    "How to be your own power company" by Jim Cullen

    "Cottage water systems" by Max Burns

    I especially liked the power company book as it allowed for easy lighting in a trailer simply by installing an auxiliary battery in your vehicle and using a 12v
    system.
    Wish they had had these nifty L.E.D. lights back in the day!

    Does the Cullen book talk about generators and solar panels, and how to hook them up to an inverter and battery bank? That's what I need - an idiot's guide to wiring an off-grid electrical system.

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Acala View Post
    Does the Cullen book talk about generators and solar panels, and how to hook them up to an inverter and battery bank? That's what I need - an idiot's guide to wiring an off-grid electrical system.
    Yep. Covers quite a few things. It is an older publication 1980. So there may be other books out there more updated (but, I really like hand drawings, LOL). Very basic from a back to earther.
    Covers solar. gens and water reducers. If you get a place with a good water flow there is a lot of electricity to be gotten from it.

    As an aside I don't know how much you are planning to put into it money wise. I was pretty poor at the time so was limited in that respect. On an adjacent property a guy set up, I think he said he was a commodities trader, a great self-sufficient homestead.

    He used solar, wind and water to power a 50 industrial battery bank with a computer to run it. His house was 12 volt and had, no lie, a dish-washer! LOL
    Talk about envious.

    Heat was an exterior wood-broiler and cooling was a conduit system beneath his house that was fed form a pipe located in a shady knell, through the graveled conduit, through filters and into the house.

  27. #24
    One thing I should mention is when we moved my husband was 42 and I was 36. We had three small sons and very little money. We were to live in an old broken down storage shed. My husband told me if we don't do it now he would lose his nerve to do it so we moved the the next spring. Never regretted it.



  28. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  29. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Meatwasp View Post
    One thing I should mention is when we moved my husband was 42 and I was 36. We had three small sons and very little money. We were to live in an old broken down storage shed. My husband told me if we don't do it now he would lose his nerve to do it so we moved the the next spring. Never regretted it.
    Never regretted it. Miss it a helluva lot. The time might come soon to do it again.
    When I first came out of the "wilderness" all the things that I had missed were so wonderfully new. Flushing indoor commode, YES! Television, YES! Cellphone, you mean I can talk to anyone at any time, YES!
    Now, understand that all these amenities are available to a homesteader, I just didn't have the means at the time.
    However, all the junk, and a 9 to 5 job, quickly ceased to be so amazing. It took about a year.
    The delivery pizzas or the store bought steak does not compare to a deer that I had hunted and processed. No way. Every time I ate from it I thought of how the meat was put before me and gave thanks. Every time.
    Damn, I'm about ready to go "wild" just thinking about it.

  30. #26
    OMG I want to just run half way into the woods and stop right there for fear of running back out.
    Phill you just threw a craving on me for some real (Deer) food.
    I'm calling the processors tomorrow to see who might have left something unclaimed.

    Keep it coming guys, this thread rocks.
    Pandora's box is not only open but its sides have been split with a razor and it now resides in a dumpster.

  31. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by phill4paul View Post
    Never regretted it. Miss it a helluva lot. The time might come soon to do it again.
    When I first came out of the "wilderness" all the things that I had missed were so wonderfully new. Flushing indoor commode, YES! Television, YES! Cellphone, you mean I can talk to anyone at any time, YES!
    Now, understand that all these amenities are available to a homesteader, I just didn't have the means at the time.
    However, all the junk, and a 9 to 5 job, quickly ceased to be so amazing. It took about a year.
    The delivery pizzas or the store bought steak does not compare to a deer that I had hunted and processed. No way. Every time I ate from it I thought of how the meat was put before me and gave thanks. Every time.
    Damn, I'm about ready to go "wild" just thinking about it.
    Yes when I finally got my kitchen built I had a sink to wash dishes in . No more buckets steaming in our little lean too kitchen that was behind the shack My husband was very clever and he put a copper tube running into my big wood burning stove when we finally moved into a bigger house. It heated the hot water for baths and dishes. What joy. He worked and worked with the kids and they made a saw mill that cut all the lumber for the house.
    We of course did a lot of gold mining too.
    People were wonderful to us . They gave us a tub and flush toilet and sinks for my bathroom. Some fishermen that owed a big carpet store brought his crew down and layed wool carpet down for us. A dear friend from the south always came with tons of beans and rice for us. We had wonderful friends.

  32. #28
    After working for months my husband and boys built a saw mill and we made a bigger house. We lived in that sack for many years. My husband made me a leanto kichen and we all crowded in it.
    We had fishermen friends that brought us toilets, bathroom sinks and a blue tub. My husband was clever and he put a copper tube running in our big wood stove that stored hot water in a heater we found in the dump. What joy when we could have a flush toilet and hot water for baths and dishes.
    People really helped us our first years. Like one friend said you are living like I would like but I don't have the nerve to do it but I want you to survive. He always brought tons of food.
    We did a lot of goldmining then.

  33. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Meatwasp View Post
    We had wonderful friends.
    I think the most importance difference when it comes to "wilding". Nothing superficial about them.

    I acquired one of those nice wood stoves with the water in-n-out. Great stuff there and it would be great to get pcosmar in on this thread. I'm sure he could send a picture of one real quick.

    When we first set up we did it in an old school bus converted. At first for hot water I used about 100' of hose and spray painted it black and snaked it on the top of the bus so the sun would heat it and give us hot water. So limited but so good!

    LOL, this thread is a hoot! Many memories being brought back.

  34. #30
    lol We also had a black plastic pipe running down from our reservoir to the Flat and we would take baths in it. The problem was when it was in the hot sun the water scorched us and when it went through the cold shade we froze. Ha!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. Minneapolis Is Micromanaging the Food Supply
    By Suzanimal in forum Health Freedom
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-26-2014, 04:46 PM
  2. best emergency food supply?
    By the count in forum Freedom Living
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-14-2010, 07:02 PM
  3. Do you own emergency long-term food supply?
    By eOs in forum U.S. Political News
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 10-20-2009, 10:10 PM
  4. For those looking for a food supply
    By jkm1864 in forum Freedom Living
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: 12-22-2008, 05:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •