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Thread: HomeMade Water Distiller/EZ/Cheap!

  1. #1

    HomeMade Water Distiller/EZ/Cheap!

    Hello All,

    Here is a water distiller I made for under 40 bucks. This is meant more for outdoors, camp/ field applications, but there is no reason it wouldn't work in the kitchen - Only the amount of electric or gas you would use may not be cheaper than store bought gallons of distilled water, and the fact that it is bulky. But if you are in the woods, wood is free! water is free!
    It is definitely cheaper than any and all models of the Waterwise company, especially their field version. Enjoy!




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  3. #2
    Thank you, this is a real find.

  4. #3
    That's pretty sweet! Thanks for sharing.

  5. #4
    Why are desalination plants so expensive if all they have to do is make a giant one of these?

    Awesome post. Thank you. Would have never thought of this.

  6. #5
    Because it takes a LOT of energy to heat that water. It's fine for a single family's drinking water, but it's not practical for watering lawns, industrial uses, etc.

  7. #6
    check out this http://www.comforthouse.com/travelfilters.html same concept that'll do 16 gallon a day on campfire ONLY $329, every household should have one

  8. #7

  9. #8

    Aluminum does not make for good distillation equipment

    The distiller shown is both clever and functional, but I would suggest using either glass or stainless steel for all components. Cake pans and such are available in both glass and stainless steel, but do cost considerably more.

    Aluminum WILL produce potentially harmful toxins, particularly when used to distill "dirty" water of unknown composition, because aluminum, being an oxidizing metal, will attract and adhere to various other metals and chemicals which may be present. In addition, heat distillation of even relatively pure water using aluminum components ALWAYS results in an electrically conductive product which is not suitable for making Collodial silver nor medically safe saline solutions.

    Several years ago I discarded all aluminum and "teflon" coated cooking materials on the advice of a rather obscure article in Readers Digest. I suffered from several maladies which were, I found out later, precursors of both Alzheimer's and various cancers including that of the prostate.

    I now use exclusively glass, stainless steel or uncoated cast iron for all kitchen appliances.

    With the stuff coming down, one does not need to add toxic metal poisoning to the list of things to avoid...
    Last edited by watchman; 05-03-2009 at 09:46 AM.



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  11. #9
    Ok, I've been studying the distillers for quite a while as I want to use that as part of my method of turning the infinite supply of saltwater (from the Gulf) in my back yard to my home water supply.

    The only thing I can critique about your distiller is that it doesn't account for the chemicals that have a lower boiling point than H2O such as chlorine, pesticides, herbicides, buried waste and other chemicals...
    When your water is boiling at less than 220 degrees these chemicals will evaporate and gather at the top of your system and mix right back in with the water you end up with.

    I think that's why the commercial water distillers have a timed process for distilling water where it heats up to a certain temperature with a valve open, then heats to boiling point with the valve closed (at least that's what I hope it's doing).

    I considered making one with an electronic valve and a temperature guage...the supply in would be stopped once the lower container is full, the valve would be open as the temperature rises to 220, then when it hits that temperature it holds that temperature and closes the valve until the tank is mostly empty. Then bring the temperature down again and re-fill the container.

    I was thinking along the lines of a very tall structure outside that was constantly supplying water (maybe even powered by solar panels). But that would be a huge task...especially needing to take into account all of the parts being exposed to salt water.
    Definition of political insanity: Voting for the same people expecting different results.

  12. #10

    corrosion

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeeder View Post
    Why are desalination plants so expensive if all they have to do is make a giant one of these?

    Awesome post. Thank you. Would have never thought of this.

    Hot salt water is very corrosive. Whatever container you boil it in is going to need constant maintenance. Also, it generates toxic brine as a byproduct. There is really no good way to dispose of the brine. It poisons the land if you dump it on land and it kills everything where you dump it in the ocean.

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Acala View Post
    Hot salt water is very corrosive. Whatever container you boil it in is going to need constant maintenance. Also, it generates toxic brine as a byproduct. There is really no good way to dispose of the brine. It poisons the land if you dump it on land and it kills everything where you dump it in the ocean.
    You can boil it until dry, then place the remaining solids in a glass container, which can then go into a landfill.

  14. #12
    hi elwar

    Ok, I've been studying the distillers for quite a while as I want to use that as part of my method of turning the infinite supply of saltwater (from the Gulf) in my back yard to my home water supply.

    The only thing I can critique about your distiller is that it doesn't account for the chemicals that have a lower boiling point than H2O such as chlorine, pesticides, herbicides, buried waste and other chemicals...
    When your water is boiling at less than 220 degrees these chemicals will evaporate and gather at the top of your system and mix right back in with the water you end up with.
    Please read where it says to boil the water BEFORE you add the lid, and then AGAIN boil the final harvested water. The first stage removes Bulk VOCs the second stage removes the residual ones that accidentally came over.

    Hi Watchman
    The distiller shown is both clever and functional, but I would suggest using either glass or stainless steel for all components. Cake pans and such are available in both glass and stainless steel, but do cost considerably more.

    Aluminum WILL produce potentially harmful toxins, particularly when used to distill "dirty" water of unknown composition, because aluminum, being an oxidizing metal, will attract and adhere to various other metals and chemicals which may be present. In addition, heat distillation of even relatively pure water using aluminum components ALWAYS results in an electrically conductive product which is not suitable for making Collodial silver nor medically safe saline solutions.
    True. However: If the Bottom vessel was aluminum, whatever reactions take place, the solids would precipitate out of solution and remain in the bottom vessel. One could only speculate what gasses could be produced and accidentally come over and in what quantity, most likely they would be shed in the final boiling of the harvest water to an acceptable level for human consumption. (especially in armageddon scenario )
    Now if the top vessel was aluminum, the hot water collecting in it would be (ideally) very pure and nearly unreactive, again most likely shedding any residuals in the final boiling of the harvest. (except minor aluminum oxide, depending on the grade of metal, which may effect taste, but is considered non-toxic) If in doubt, one could use a bit of the suspect harvest water to thoroughly clean the bottom vessel, and then run the harvest through the whole cycle again, this would most likely remove any residuals (save for the oxide, which happens with any aluminum cookware). But to remove ALL doubt, yes, use steel! I would not recommend glass only because this is supposed to be a rugged end-of-the-world distiller - I'd rather bend and dent it then break it!
    Oh and YES, no coatings whatsoever! I will edit that doc, thanks.

    hi Acala

    Hot salt water is very corrosive. Whatever container you boil it in is going to need constant maintenance. Also, it generates toxic brine as a byproduct. There is really no good way to dispose of the brine. It poisons the land if you dump it on land and it kills everything where you dump it in the ocean.
    True for this reason and more is why I wrote not to boil past an inch depth, then dump and refill - by doing this, most likely the molar concentration will be tolerable to the bearing vessel. For even the $300 water wise rip-off isn't made out of brine resistant titanium! Just steel.

    Hi all

    This device is for people like me who make their own things, it was designed for worst case scenario (no house, electric, civilization, etc) and to be simple, quick and cost effective. My goal was not an elaborate fractional distillation tower, nor an attractive addition to a gourmet kitchen, nor a devise that only quantum physicists can build!


    Thanks for posting!!

  15. #13
    I agree that purchasing a water distiller from the store or online can be pricey. But, made correctly, a homemade water distiller is just as dependable as a store-bought one. But due to the lack of time, I am looking for instore water dispenser by reading various reviews
    Last edited by DilanShark; 05-25-2019 at 04:02 AM.



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