Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 39

Thread: Fascism: Would you Join an Active Resistance at Risk to your Own Life?

  1. #1

    Fascism: Would you Join an Active Resistance at Risk to your Own Life?

    ....or would you cower in fear, minding your own business and keeping a low profile?

    (As did most Germans, Italians)
    The world does not consist of a throng of geniuses. WilliamBanzai7



  2. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  3. #2

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ItsTime View Post
    Lay low and cower for sure.
    ditto
    R[∃vo˩]ution

    I believe the very heart and soul of conservatism is libertarianism. -Ronald Reagan

  5. #4

    Thumbs up

    I would join as an anti-facist propaganda artist.
    Quote Originally Posted by Torchbearer
    what works can never be discussed online. there is only one language the government understands, and until the people start speaking it by the magazine full... things will remain the same.
    Hear/buy my music here "government is the enemy of liberty"-RP Support me on Patreon here Ephesians 6:12

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by raiha View Post
    ....or would you cower in fear, minding your own business and keeping a low profile?

    (As did most Germans, Italians)
    Both.

  7. #6
    Flee. If unable, mumble and grumble until I became bored at which point I'd throw my life away to fight for a life worth living.

  8. #7
    Go down with guns a blazing.

    What was that movie?
    Pfizer Macht Frei!

    Openly Straight Man, Danke, Awarded Top Rated Influencer. Community Standards Enforcer.


    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!

    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  9. #8



  10. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  11. #9
    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

  12. #10
    I'd escape to a foreign country and plot against the government. Then again, Alaska would probably be in a big war with the feds. So I'd go to Alaska.

  13. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by CaseyJones View Post
    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
    Ya, that's it.


    Pfizer Macht Frei!

    Openly Straight Man, Danke, Awarded Top Rated Influencer. Community Standards Enforcer.


    Quiz: Test Your "Income" Tax IQ!

    Short Income Tax Video

    The Income Tax Is An Excise, And Excise Taxes Are Privilege Taxes

    The Federalist Papers, No. 15:

    Except as to the rule of appointment, the United States have an indefinite discretion to make requisitions for men and money; but they have no authority to raise either by regulations extending to the individual citizens of America.

  14. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Danke View Post
    Go down with guns a blazing.

    What was that movie?
    Vanishing Point.
    Pandora's box is not only open but its sides have been split with a razor and it now resides in a dumpster.

  15. #13
    Ideally, I'd like to think I'd be one of the first ones to speak up, and probably one of the first examples. A necessary sacrifice, but...

    Imagine if I stood on a soapbox in a busy new york street and start shouting facts about the Fed, government coercion, aggressive wars, etc. Would anyone listen? No. I'd be denounced as a crazy person, and if the police hauled me into a back alley and clubbed me to death, no one would notice or care.

    Honestly, if someone like Adam Kokesh or Alex Jones were publicly executed on live, prime-time television, I firmly believe most americans would just cheer it on, whether silently or aloud. This culture has been that utterly deranged by the military and the media.

    Now, I wonder if the Nazi era was any different. Why were the germans not protesting? Were they truly afraid, as many people assume, or were they satisfied?

    I don't know. I don't want to take the path of cowardice, but is bravery even worth it when I could just have bread and circuses?

  16. #14
    Both, and due my part to subvert the regime as best I could. I would go underground and offline.

  17. #15

  18. #16

    Resistance Tactics

    Resistance Tactics
    Ted Galen Carpenter | January 1995 Print Edition

    Strategic Nonviolent Conflict: The Dynamics of People Power in the Twentieth Century, by Peter Ackerman and Christopher Kruegler, Westport, CT: Praeger, 380 pages, $55/$22.95 paper


    A persistent problem facing the victims of an invading army or an indigenous dictatorship is how to defend or restore their freedom, and especially how to do so without precipitating a bloodbath. The standard initial response to invading forces is conventional military defense, but that approach is not particularly practical when the aggressor is much larger and more powerful. The most common forms of resistance to entrenched repressive regimes, whether homegrown or installed by a conqueror, are guerrilla warfare and terrorism. But the success rates of those strategies are spotty at best and likely to increase the level of human carnage.

    In Strategic Nonviolent Conflict: The Dynamics of People Power in the Twentieth Century, Peter Ackerman, a visiting scholar at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, and Christopher Kruegler, president of the Albert Einstein Institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, present compelling arguments that a well-conceived campaign of nonviolent resistance may be a more feasible option. Their book, which builds on the pioneering studies of scholars such
    as Gene Sharp and Thomas Schelling, provides crucial insights into the reasons why some attempts at nonviolent resistance succeed and why others fail. Although the authors do not attempt to offer a comprehensive strategic blueprint--the varied circumstances of confrontational situations would make such a rigid formulation impractical--they do develop several important principles of nonviolent strategy.

    The topic is of more than academic interest in the post-Cold War era. Ackerman and Kruegler's observations are pertinent to any number of contemporary geopolitical situations. Consider the tense relations between Russia and the small countries on its perimeter. The Baltic states fear the upsurge of Russian chauvinism symbolized by Vladimir Zhirinovsky and worry that it might be the prelude to a new wave of Russian expansionism. But there's no way that Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, given their limited populations and resources, could ever hope to repel an invading army from a neo-imperial Russia. Or consider Cuba. The Cuban economy is so weak that it must ration butter, but the army is hardly lacking guns. Dissidents hoping to accelerate the demise of the Castro regime have few options other than nonviolent resistance.

    As befits the relevance of its topic, Ackerman and Kruegler's book is not a dry theoretical treatise disconnected from the real world. The authors examine six historical episodes of nonviolent resistance undertaken by populations that lacked access to effective military power.

    Those episodes are quite diverse: the Russian rebellion of 1905; the German public's resistance to the French occupation of the Ruhr in 1923; India's agitation against British colonialism in 1930-31; Danish resistance to the Nazi occupation in World War II; the civic strike against the dictatorship of Gen. Maximiliano Hernández Martinez in El Salvador in 1944; and Solidarity's campaign against Poland's communist government in 1980-81.


    The authors' historical survey undermines a number of persistent myths about nonviolent resistance. One is the notion that such movements are spontaneous mass uprisings by populations that have been pushed beyond endurance--the implication being that it is futile to outline organizational or strategic principles for waging a resistance campaign because such uprising cannot be anticipated, much less channeled. The case studies examined show, however, that while there were spontaneous aspects to the resistance movements, there were also important elements of planning and coordination that varied in effectiveness and sophistication.

    Another myth is that nonviolent resistance is both "passive" and pacifist (indeed, the technique is all too often misnamed "passive resistance"). Ackerman and Kruegler demonstrate clearly that such movements, while seeking to avoid bloodshed, can be quite assertive, if not aggressive. For example, the Ruhrkampf directed against the French included the open harassment of French military personnel. More recently, the Philippine "People Power" revolution in 1986 involved tense confrontations between demonstrators and the military. Leaders of the insurgent forces deliberately courted such confrontations to force the military to choose sides--either to fire on innocent civilians or abandon its support of the Marcos dictatorship.

    In fact, Ackerman and Kruegler point out that there is no conceptual chasm separating violent and nonviolent tactics; there is instead a spectrum of measures. Even basically "nonviolent" movements sometimes resorted to sabotage of industrial machinery, communications paraphernalia, and transportation equipment as part of their resistance campaign. That was a prominent feature of the 1905 Russian rebellion, the German resistance to the French occupation of the Ruhr, and the Danish underground's harassment of the Nazis.

    Indeed, leaders of nonviolent campaigns frequently find it difficult to restrain supporters who wish to escalate the level of violence. The disappointing outcomes of the Russian and German case studies suggest that a failure to maintain adequate nonviolent discipline can reduce the probability of achieving a movement's ultimate objectives because it alienates potential domestic and external supporters.

    The most tenacious myth Ackerman and Kruegler debunk is that nonviolent resistance is effective only in dealing with democratic governments that have adopted uncharacteristically repressive policies. According to that argument, peaceful demonstrations and civil disobedience can prick the conscience of democratic rulers and publics, gain the support of international opinion, and force a change of policy while totalitarian and authoritarians regimes will simply use whatever force is necessary to smash the opposition.


    The episodes examined in Strategic Nonviolent Conflict suggest that the reality is far more complex. If the conventional wisdom were correct, the successful movements would have been the German resistance to the occupation forces of democratic France and the Indian anti-colonialism movement against democratic Britain. And, following the logic through, the Danish resistance to Nazi Germany's occupation, the Salvadoran rebellion, and Poland's Solidarity would have had faint prospects.

    The actual results don't fit that pattern. For example, the resistance to the Ruhr occupation ultimately fizzled, despite substantial covert support from the German government. (Only the U.S.-sponsored Dawes plan eventually caused Paris to withdraw its forces.) The Indian effort, led by Mohandas K. Gandhi, failed as well, at least in the short run. (Although Britain ultimately granted India independence, it did so only because of the financial exhaustion caused by World War II.) Conversely, the Danish resistance movement was surprisingly effective; the El Salvador strike ousted an odious dictator; and the Solidarity campaign, while only partially successful in the short term, created the conditions for a definitive victory just a few years later.

    Ackerman and Kruegler demonstrate that the political orientation of the target regime is not the most important factor in whether or not a particular movement succeeds. Instead, the authors argue that what makes or breaks a resistance movement is how well it implements certain principles of nonviolent conflict. The major principles identified by Ackerman and Kruegler include a number of common-sense observations. Under "principles of development," for example, the authors stress the importance of formulating functional objectives, developing organizational strength, and attempting to secure external assistance. Under "principles of engagement," they emphasize such things as muting the impact of the opponents' preponderance of force and maintaining nonviolent discipline (i.e., eschewing terrorism).

    Other insights are less obvious, however, and many of them relate to the importance of maintaining tactical flexibility. One vital principle of development, for instance, is to expand the repertoire of nonviolent sanctions. The struggle against repressive authorities is inherently dynamic, not static. Consequently, the regime in power will attempt to parry the tactics employed by the insurgents and then counterattack. Staying with one tactic (e.g., mass demonstrations) too long can enable initially beleaguered authorities to regroup and strike back at a time and place of their choice. That is perhaps the saddest lesson of the failure of the student-led Chinese campaign for democracy, which perished in Tiananmen Square.

    The need to alienate the regime from expected bases of support is an especially crucial principle of engagement. Hence, for example, Solidarity's inability to undermine the military's loyalty to the communist regime allowed the Polish government to declare martial law and rely on military units to arrest the union's leadership. Adjusting offensive and defensive operations according to the relative vulnerabilities of the protagonists represents an essential "principle of conception." Leaders of the El Salvador civic strike executed that tactic to perfection. As the authors note, "Each time the movement chose to escalate the conflict, they did so in relation to the opponent's newly exposed weaknesses."

    All of those measures have the common denominator of sustaining a flexible, dynamic, and offense-oriented resistance campaign. Indeed, a common characteristic of the unsuccessful nonviolent movements highlighted in the historical case studies is the tendency to persist with one set of tactics rather than adjust to changing conditions to exploit the oppressor's weaknesses or to compensate for emerging vulnerabilities in the resistance movement. The principles outlined by Ackerman and Kruegler should help the leaders of future resistance campaigns to focus better on strategic and tactical fundamentals. Among other benefits, nonviolent movements may exhibit less of a disorganized and "spontaneous" quality.


    While Strategic Nonviolent Conflict provides an important intellectual resource for those interested in the mechanics of unarmed defiance, some important questions, of course, remain. Although the authors effectively undermine the myth that nonviolent resistance can be effective only against misbehaving democratic governments, they are less successful at determining how such a strategy
    might be sustained against a regime or invading force that is determined to prevail at all costs and is able to retain the loyalty of enough armed personnel to execute its policies.

    In that regard, the Danish example is not entirely compelling. The Nazis were preoccupied elsewhere and regarded the occupation of Denmark as a relatively low-priority matter. One suspects that a campaign of nonviolent resistance undertaken by the Poles, Ukrainians, or other populations that stood in the way of Berlin's quest for Lebensraum in Eastern Europe would not have fared as well. Similarly, such a strategy does not appear to be feasible in the maelstrom of the former Yugoslavia, where the feuding factions seem willing to slaughter each other without a pang of guilt. It is a thorny problem that advocates of nonviolent resistance must examine more thoroughly.

    Additional analysis is also needed in connection with the authors' sobering observation that while resisters can raise the costs to an oppressive government or occupation force, the authorities can also raise the costs to the resisters in a variety of ways. Several of the principles outlined by Ackerman and Kruegler may need to be refined--and perhaps others developed--to help shift the odds more decisively against the forces of oppression.

    Such issues await the next spate of books and articles on the subject. Strategic Nonviolent Conflict makes an invaluable contribution to the study of nonviolent resistance and offers several useful guidelines to those who are dedicated to defending or recovering their freedom in the post-Cold War world. Ackerman and Kruegler have taken our understanding of nonviolent conflict to a new and impressive level.



  19. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  20. #17
    It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace-- but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

    Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775.
    "All the South has ever desired was that the Union, as established by our forefathers, should be preserved, and that the government, as originally organized, should be administered in purity and truth."

    ~ Robert E. Lee- January 5, 1866

  21. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by unreconstructed1 View Post
    It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace-- but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

    Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775.
    I've read that a hundred times and it still my makes hair stand up and a tear come to eye when I read it. Sometimes I read the whole speech out loud when no one is around.


    As for what I'll do, I'll have to evaluate the situation when it arises. I prefer to be as fluid as possible so that I can quickly adapt to changing situations.

  22. #19
    Active Resistance? Most* of us on the RPFs are already on a short list, not for what we have done or some might supposedly plan to do, we find ourselves on the “enemy of the state list” only because of our faith in Liberty versus blind obedience to the state.

    Sit quietly. Don't panic, but spread the word or we still may get to meet someday, inside those FEMA concertina crowned fences.

    Hopefully, the state will die from within before it gathers enough power to crush everyone pointing and laughing at the emperor’s lack of clothes.


    *Trolls and gubermint provocateurs excepted.

  23. #20
    "I won't belong to any organization that would have someone like me as a member." -- Groucho Marx

  24. #21

  25. #22
    I would.

    I mean, what value is there to life without liberty?
    Last edited by tmosley; 11-01-2008 at 08:25 PM.

  26. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by tmosley View Post
    I would.

    I mean, what value is there to life without liberty?
    Liberty in what degree?

    Even in fascism, there is some liberty.

  27. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by youngbuck View Post
    Great Essay!

    The answer to this question is that participants in a program of Leaderless Resistance through phantom cell or individual action must know exactly what they are doing, and how to do it. It becomes the responsibility of the individual to acquire the necessary skills and information as to what is to be done. This is by no means as impractical as it appears, because it is certainly true that in any movement, all persons involved have the same general outlook, are acquainted with the same philosophy, and generally react to given situations in similar ways. The pervious history of the committees of correspondence during the American Revolution show this to be true.

    and by this one of the necessary ingredients is Dr Paul's book The Revolution, our meetups, the Campaign for Liberty, and many other tools at our disposal.

    Committees of correspondence:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Committ...correspondence

    Thanks for the post
    RPF Rules!
    Last edited by Pauls' Revere; 11-01-2008 at 09:34 PM. Reason: text



  28. Remove this section of ads by registering.
  29. #25
    For field communication one could try sharing information by letterboxing. I heard they used something similar to this during the resistance in WW2. The more high tech method is geo cahing using GPS to locate boxes but the idea is similar.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letterboxing

  30. #26
    #1 Lay low.

    #2 Find like minded individuals which to uprise with. Lay low until numbers are high. When time is right will rock out with my cock out!
    1776 > 1984

    The FAILURE of the United States Government to operate and maintain an
    Honest Money System , which frees the ordinary man from the clutches of the money manipulators, is the single largest contributing factor to the World's current Economic Crisis.

    The Elimination of Privacy is the Architecture of Genocide

    Belief, Money, and Violence are the three ways all people are controlled

    Quote Originally Posted by Zippyjuan View Post
    Our central bank is not privately owned.

  31. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls' Revere View Post
    Great Essay!

    Thanks for the post
    RPF Rules!
    Heck yea!

  32. #28
    Is there a difference between leaderless resistance and anarchy??
    The world does not consist of a throng of geniuses. WilliamBanzai7

  33. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by raiha View Post
    Is there a difference between leaderless resistance and anarchy??
    Huge difference. Did you read the article I linked to?

  34. #30
    An active resistance would be most effective if it were somewhat discreet

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. Libya Green Resistance Alive & Active
    By NiceGoing in forum World News & Affairs
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-04-2020, 02:45 PM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-12-2013, 01:38 PM
  3. Curling Up In a Ball to Avoid Police Violence May Be Considered “Active Resistance”
    By John F Kennedy III in forum Individual Rights Violations: Case Studies
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-22-2011, 05:15 PM
  4. Get a little more active? Join the Chat Room!
    By DXDoug in forum U.S. Political News
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 04-23-2011, 11:07 AM
  5. Join the Resistance! Help Oppose The ObamaNation...
    By nodope0695 in forum Obama Watch
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-12-2008, 06:34 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •