• ammodotcom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:19 PM
    “It is interesting to hear certain kinds of people insist that the citizen cannot fight the government. This would have been news to the men of Lexington and Concord, as well as the Mujahedeen in Afghanistan. The citizen most certainly can fight the government, and usually wins when he tries. Organized national armies are useful primarily for fighting against other organized national armies. When they try to fight against the people, they find themselves at a very serious disadvantage. If you will just look around at the state of the world today, you will see that the guerillero has the upper hand. Irregulars usually defeat regulars, providing they have the will. Such fighting is horrible to contemplate, but will continue to dominate brute strength.” – Col. Jeff Cooper When one discusses the real reason for the Second Amendment – the right of citizens to defend themselves against a potentially tyrannical government – inevitably someone points out the stark difference in firepower between a guerilla uprising in the United States and the United States government itself. This is not a trivial observation. The U.S. government spends more on the military than the governments of China, Russia, Saudi Arabia, India, France, United Kingdom, and Japan combined. Plus, the potential of a tyrannical government is arguably upon us – with the federal government spying on its own citizens, militarizing local police departments with equipment and tactics from the War on Terror, and repeatedly searching Americans, which desensitizes them to this invasive process. There is much historical precedent, however, for guerilla uprisings defeating more powerful enemies. For instance, the Cold War saw both superpowers brought to their knees by rural farmers – for the Soviets, their adventure in Afghanistan against the Mujahideen, and for the United States, the Vietnam War against the Viet Cong. In both cases, nuclear weapons could have been used against the guerilla uprising, but were not. Even assuming the use of nuclear weapons from the position of total desperation, it’s hard to imagine they would have made much of a difference in the final outcome of either conflict. Unlike the invading armies, the local resistance enjoyed both broad-based support as well as knowledge of the local terrain.
    0 replies | 85 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-16-2020, 12:03 AM
    Scientific American is owned by Springer Nature, which itself is majority owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group of Stuttgart, Germany. Pretty bold move for a German-owned company to endorse an American presidential candidate, but I suppose Germany has historically always had America's best interests at heart.
    10 replies | 265 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-14-2020, 11:23 AM
    In the last Presidential election, Donald Trump was lauded for his performance among black voters – he scored 4 percent of female black voters and a whopping 13 percent of black male voters, the highest since Richard Nixon. This isn’t shocking. Black voters have voted en masse for the Democratic Party since the mid-60s and the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act and the social welfare programs of the Great Society. This solidified black voters behind the Democratic Party, but they had been moving there since the New Deal. However, it’s a historical anomaly in the United States. The traditional home of the black voter was the Republican Party, due to its historical role in ending slavery and introducing Reconstruction Acts and Amendments to the Constitution. It also did not help that the Democratic Party was the party of Jim Crow, a system of legally enforced segregation present throughout the American South in the aftermath of the Civil War. What Do We Mean When We Say “Jim Crow?” Before delving further into the topic, it is important to define precisely what we mean by Jim Crow and why it is a distinct form of legal codes in United States history. While Northern and Western cities were by no means integrated, this integration was de facto, not de jure. In many cases, the discrimination in the North was a discrimination of custom and preference, discrimination that could not be removed without a highly intrusive government action ensuring equality of outcome. Northerners and Westerners were not required to discriminate, but nor were they forbidden from doing so. Compare this to the series of laws in the American South known for mandating segregation at everything from public schools to water fountains.
    0 replies | 65 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-12-2020, 11:50 AM
    I'm working on the getting old part. I'm in my 30s and have never had a credit card. I never understood the idea of spending money I haven't got, but I guess that philosophy would destroy the economy if enough people espoused it.
    10 replies | 449 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-11-2020, 12:46 PM
    If you say “September 11” most people automatically think of the attacks on the World Trade Center buildings and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. What they probably don’t even remember happened on September 11, were the attacks on the United States Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012. Once the Libyan Revolution began in February 2011, the CIA began placing assets in the region, attempting to make contacts within the region. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, whose name and image would soon become synonymous with the Benghazi attacks, was the first liaison between the United States and the rebels. The task before the American intelligence community at that time was securing arms in the country, most notably shoulder-fired missiles, taken from the Libyan military. Eastern Libya and Benghazi were the primary focal points of intelligence-gathering in the country. But there was something else at work here: The CIA was using the country as a base to funnel weapons to anti-Assad forces in Syria, as well as their alleged diplomatic mission. Early Rumblings of Disorder in Benghazi Trouble started in April 2012. This was when two former security guards of the consulate threw an IED over the fence. No casualties were reported, but another bomb was thrown at a convoy just four days later. Soon after, in May, the office of the International Red Cross in Benghazi was attacked and the local al-Qaeda affiliate claimed responsibility. On August 6, the Red Cross suspended operations in Libya.
    0 replies | 106 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-09-2020, 10:13 PM
    Following the attacks of September 11th, Congress passed the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA), creating the Transportation Security Agency (TSA). The TSA replaced private security screening companies with one government agency. Since then, air travelers have bowed to pat downs, bans on water bottles and other inconvenient, intrusive procedures as the “new normal” at our nation’s airports. But does any of this make us safer? The short answer is no, it doesn’t. What’s more, laid out below is the quantifiable evidence that the TSA is a massive boondoggle that has done little to keep Americans safe while they travel. Indeed, it might make us less safe by providing a false sense of security, as American politicians shy away from ever questioning the efficacy of the TSA (or other elements deemed necessary for “homeland security”). Perhaps more disturbing is the established record of TSA agents stealing from passengers. You’re far more likely to get robbed by a TSA agent than you are to get protected by one, a shorthand for the bureaucratic state if there ever was one. We did an in-depth study about the history, practices and statistics of the Transportation Security Agency. Whether you’re skeptical of the TSA efficacy, convinced of their incompetence, or just irritated about having to get groped to go on a plane, this article is a must read. Security Theater and the TSA
    0 replies | 180 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-09-2020, 07:37 PM
    Why is the slippery slope considered a logical fallacy? These days it seems more and more like the most important truth to live by.
    6 replies | 325 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-08-2020, 05:31 PM
    It’s a rather strange claim of the American far left that their interests are opposed to that of corporate America, because there’s virtually no evidence to support it. Quite the contrary: During the wave of Black Lives Matter rioting that took place during the early summer of 2020, American corporations marched in lockstep. Not only did they use social media to swear fealty to this political movement, but they also made massive internal changes in conformity with BLM propaganda. It’s called “woke capitalism” and while it’s not necessarily new, it’s certainly more prevalent than it ever has been. The term itself was coined by conservative editorial writer Ross Douthat in 2018. He succinctly summed up what woke capitalism is: superficial nods toward cultural leftism that allow the company to do what it really exists to do – make money. You might be confused or think that there’s something ironic or askew about major corporations backing supposed “rebel” ideologies. However, this stems from a very surface understanding of the topic. When we delve deeper into it, the motivation for large corporations siding with ostensibly “anti-capitalist” groups will come clearly into focus. What is “Wokeness?”: Understanding “Critical Theory” and The Frankfurt School Before going any further, we should spend some time defining what “wokeness” means.
    0 replies | 108 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-05-2020, 12:39 AM
    If Utah would just start selling real beer at gas stations we'd bump it up a few points for sure. Minnesota should follow suit – near beer is probably Minnesota's biggest problem at the moment.
    3 replies | 447 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-03-2020, 11:23 AM
    The failed state is to post-modernity what the nation-state was to modernity. It’s a recent development that is a hallmark of our age – like a state, but incapable of exercising sovereignty over all of its nominal territory. And while it might sound a little far-fetched, the failed state isn’t just coming to the West. It might already be here. What Is a Failed State? • A de facto separatist nation or nations existing within the boundaries of their de jure territory, competing for the monopoly on legitimate use of physical force. • Failure of the legitimate authority of the nation to make practical, collective decisions. • Inability to adequately provide basic social services such as policing, firefighting or emergency medical services to some or all of its territory. • Inability to connect with other states through diplomatic channels; a lack of participation in the international community. • A central government incapable of collecting enough tax revenue to operate effectively.
    3 replies | 447 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-02-2020, 11:18 AM
    I picture Jill Biden emerging from her country home, the patches peeling off the knees of her worn out overalls, a giant clay jug of moonshine tied around her waist with a length of frayed rope, cradling a double barrel shotgun in her scaly, yellowing arms. "Hey! Git off mah propertah!" she hollers as she unleashes a barrage of double-aught into the wating trees. The rustlers take note and leave her herd alone ... for another day.
    7 replies | 246 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-01-2020, 05:28 PM
    Agreed. Look at Japan – nowhere near as much arable land as America, still grows enoguh rice on their own to feed their own people.
    7 replies | 398 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    09-01-2020, 04:28 PM
    “You don't need an AR-15. It's harder to aim, it's harder to use, and in fact, you don't need 30 rounds to protect yourself.” – Joe Biden The one-two punch of the Wuhan Coronavirus explosion, and the civil unrest of early 2020, led to an unprecedented growth in firearms ownership in America. All told, there were about two million firearms sold in the month of March 2020 alone. Between March and July, an additional three million were sold, with about half of those happening in the month of June. Ammunition sales have similarly spiked, with record sales occurring on this website. However, gun owners don’t need a report to know that there has been a massive surge in demand for ammunition. They need only go down to their local gun store and see that all of the most common rounds are in short supply, sold out or being rationed at the point of sale. But it’s not just guns and ammo. There has also been a significant increase in the number of Americans obtaining their concealed carry weapons permit and packing on a daily basis. Forbes magazine estimates that 20 million Americans are now carrying as part of their everyday life.
    7 replies | 246 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-31-2020, 03:58 PM
    Farm subsidies are perhaps the ultimate, but secret, third rail of American politics. While entitlements are discussed out in the open, farm subsidies are rarely talked about – even though they are the most expensive subsidy Washington doles out. All told, the U.S. government spends $20 billion annually on farm subsidies, with approximately 39 percent of all farms receiving some sort of subsidy. For comparison, the oil industry gets about $4.6 billion annually and annual housing subsidies total another $15 billion. A significant portion of this $20 billion goes not to your local family farm, but to Big Aggie. (Note that this $20 billion annual farm subsidy figure doesn’t take into account the 30+ years of ethanol subsidies to the corn industry nor export subsidies to U.S. farmers issued by the USDA.) The government never properly explains why this is. Certainly small farmers are growing their crops at enormous risk. However, it’s not clear that agriculture is any different than other high-risk industries – especially because the United States is blessed with some of the most fertile farmland in the world, and a highly skilled labor force. Subsidies don’t just cost taxpayers, an expense that might properly be justified by showing a return on investment. Subsidies also provide powerful disincentives against innovation, as well as cost effectiveness and diversification of land use.
    7 replies | 398 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-30-2020, 09:37 AM
    No, I want to stop them as soon as they start committing the crime.
    19 replies | 750 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-28-2020, 10:47 AM
    Reeks of Minority Report. I don't like the kind of rabbit hole that taking away people's rights to prevent them from commiting crimes leads down.
    19 replies | 750 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-28-2020, 10:12 AM
    I love how she's posturing like she's on a high horse and only effectively admits that Trump would wipe the floor with Biden in a debate. ("Debate" being a poorly suited word, like the people above me point out.) The instant two of Biden's brain cells fail to mesh gears it'd be like the floor of a slaughterhouse.
    5 replies | 361 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-27-2020, 12:33 PM
    It is often said that before the Civil War, the United States “are,” but after the War, the United States “is.” This is a reference to the formerly theoretically sovereign nature of each state as compared to “one nation, indivisible.” More than just the theoretic sovereignty of the individual states, the territory now comprising the U.S. has a rich history of sovereign states outside the control of the federal government. Some of these you’ve almost certainly heard of, but a lot of them are quite obscure. Each points toward a potential American secession of the future. Vermont Republic (January 15, 1777 – March 4, 1791) Current Territory: The State of Vermont The earliest sovereign state in North America after the Revolution was the Vermont Republic, also known as the Green Mountain Republic or the Republic of New Connecticut. The Republic was known by the United States as “the New Hampshire Grants” and was not recognized by the Continental Congress. The people of the Vermont Republic contacted the British government about union with Quebec, which was accepted on generous terms. They ultimately declined union with Quebec after the end of the Revolutionary War, during which they were involved in the Battle of Bennington, and the territory was accepted into the Union as the 14th state – the first after the original 13. The country had its own postal system and coinage, known as Vermont coppers. These bore the inscription “Stella quarta decima,” meaning “the 14th star” in Latin. They were originally known as “New Connecticut” because Connecticut’s Continental representative also represented Vermont Republic’s interests at Congress. However, the name was changed to Vermont, meaning “Green Mountains” in French.
    1 replies | 622 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-25-2020, 10:30 PM
    Reminds me of what Ignatius of Loyola once said (although disputed): "Give me the child for the first seven years and I will give you the man." It just begs the question of what kind of man the government wants to govern.
    3 replies | 321 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-24-2020, 05:15 PM
    “He alone, who owns the youth, gains the future.” –Adolf Hitler Public schools are so ubiquitous and ingrained in American culture that one could easily be forgiven for thinking that we, as a nation, have always had them. However, public schools are a relatively recent invention. Federal funding for public schools is a recent anomaly, dating back to the days of President Jimmy Carter. His successor, President Ronald Reagan, famously tried to dismantle the Department of Education to no avail. Public schools being an arm of the state are indoctrination centers. This becomes increasingly true as basic skills such as the old “three Rs” of “reading, writing and ‘rithmatic” are jettisoned in favor of climate change, critical race theory and gender ideology – all of which are now part and parcel of a public education in the United States. As if this weren’t troubling enough, public schools are largely funded by property taxes on housing. These taxes, which are paid generally on a bi-annual basis, are confiscated from people whose children do not even attend public schools. What’s more, these taxes require people to effectively pay rent on owned property under penalty of losing their homes. We do not have to look far for an alternative to the world of public schools. Throughout most of American history, education has been the purview of parents, the church, and other private institutions. The rise of public education in the United States is a story of violence and coercion that is largely hidden from the public record. After reading this, you will never view public schools in the same light ever again.
    3 replies | 321 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-21-2020, 06:16 PM
    On this episode Sam invites Mark Thornton onto the show. Together they discuss the economics of slavery and the long lasting effects of it on economies. Mark Thornton is an economic historian and a senior fellow with the Mises Institute. While everyone knows a bit about slavery, few think about the economics of it. It is the contention of Thornton that slavery was not a profitable institution in the antebellum South and that its after effects continue to drive the industrial underdevelopment of the region today. Click here to listen to the podcast.
    0 replies | 178 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-21-2020, 05:29 PM
    Holy moly, you just gave me chills. Well put!
    29 replies | 1259 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-21-2020, 05:28 PM
    Holy moly, you just gave me chills. Well put!
    29 replies | 1259 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-20-2020, 10:19 PM
    If you’re under the age of 40 and you’re reading this, chances are very good that your interest in the liberty movement was sparked by three-time presidential candidate and veteran Texas Congressman Ron Paul. Paul inspired an entire generation of Libertarians, Constitutionalists and limited-government Conservatives with his 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns. It might surprise you to learn that Paul is not originally from Texas, but Pittsburgh, where he was born to a dairy farmer and his wife. He graduated from Gettysburg State College in 1957, with a degree in biology. He earned his medical degree from Duke’s School of Medicine in 1961. From 1963 to 1965, he was a flight surgeon in the United States Air Force, before moving over to the Air National Guard from 1965 to 1968. Upon discharge, he relocated to Texas to start a private practice in obstetrics and gynecology. While he had been reading Austrian economics and Libertarian political philosophy for years beforehand, he finally decided to run for Congress when President Richard Nixon took the nation off of the gold standard in 1971. He lost his first attempt at public office in 1974, but won a special election in 1976, losing the regular election later that year by a mere 300 votes. He defeated his opponent in 1978, serving until 1985, then again from 1997 to 2013. Continue reading Ron Paul: The Untold Story of the Man Who Helped Inspire a New Generation of Liberty Lovers at Ammo.com. You can also listen to our Resistance Library podcast episode about Mr. Paul right here.
    0 replies | 160 view(s)
  • ammodotcom's Avatar
    08-19-2020, 06:52 PM
    Too many people find that anger too profitable to stop stoking it. Plus, righteous fury feels fantastic no matter your politics.
    9 replies | 880 view(s)
No More Results
About ammodotcom

Basic Information

About ammodotcom
Biography:
Ammo.com believes arming our fellow Americans – both physically and philosophically – helps them fulfill our Founding Fathers' intent with the Second Amendment: To serve as a check on state power.
Profile Sidebar Configuration

Profile Sidebar Configuration

Political / Activist Bio:
We believe in free speech, privacy and personal sovereignty. And that – like with gun control – unchecked expansion of state power in any of these areas deserves resistance. But while most people believe the problem is right vs. left, we believe it’s liberty vs. authoritarian.

Every round of ammo sold on our site goes to support these beliefs, which is why we voluntarily donate 1% of Ammo.com purchases to a pro-freedom organization of your choice.
Activist Reputation (Self-Rated):
1
Activist Reputation (Staff Rated):
1

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
103
Posts Per Day
0.33
General Information
Last Activity
Today 11:11 AM
Join Date
11-14-2019
Referrals
0
Home Page
https://ammo.com/
No results to display...
No results to display...
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

09-09-2020


09-01-2020


08-28-2020


08-12-2020


08-09-2020


08-03-2020


07-21-2020


07-16-2020


07-13-2020


07-10-2020


06-30-2020


06-25-2020


06-24-2020


06-23-2020


06-16-2020


06-14-2020


01-11-2020


01-09-2020


12-12-2019



Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast