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  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 04:40 AM
    Bang their cousins, and regret that Swedes arrived here first? :confused:
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 04:23 AM
    Art's been going away from skill and order (e.g. Rembrandt) for a long time. It's been going toward feeling and chaos (e.g. Vassili Kandinsky). Then Andy painted a can of chicken noodle or whatever; and that was about the end of the road. Then some post-talent dumb-ass taped a fruit to a wall, and some other dumbass bought it, to be edgy.
    9 replies | 176 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 04:13 AM
    That seems a fitting illustration.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 04:01 AM
    Well, thoughts of Lucifer are not misplaced. In 1649 some English traitors (roundheads), after some years of civil war, hanged their good and rightful king, King Charles I. Said the King from the scaffold: Charles I, January 30, 1649
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 03:39 AM
    If there's to be a single list of problems in our culture, the Marquis de Sade is right at the tippy top. I mean, think about it this way; they had to invent a new word to describe how deranged this son of a bitch was.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 03:32 AM
    That's not Louis XVI (of France), that's Charles I (of England) - the first victim of the revolution. ...which is older than you think.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 03:22 AM
    Nothing new under the sun..
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 03:20 AM
    I'd also recommend Simon Schama's Citizens. It's not as interesting as Webster's, but it provides useful historical context about the French revolution. If you're not very familiar with figures like Voltaire or Rousseau or their influence, this will be helpful.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 03:05 AM
    That's debatable, Webster sort of takes that position, which may or may not be correct. Several of them were probably not only freemasons, but of lodges associated with the old German Illuminati; but that's speculative and doesn't really matter at the end of the day. There were several factions in 1789. One was that of the Duke of Orleans, close blood relative of the King, who was trying to stage a simple palace coup d'etat, as had occurred hundreds of times in various European countries for centuries. He wanted to get rid of Louis XVI, who was perceived as something of a weak King, and take the throne himself. The Duke literally paid cash to many of the early rioters in Paris - paid them to riot. But the Duke opened Pandora's box, created a lot of chaos, which opened the door to the second group, the anarchists/communists. This was a motley group, consisting of both organized communist revolutionaries like Robespierre and his associates, on the one hand, and also psychotics recently released from the nuthouse (literally) like the Marquis de Sade (from which we get the term sadism). When they organized their attacks on the city authorities, Louis XVI blinked, not wanting to shoot his own subjects, though he could and should have shot these ones. And the rest is history.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 02:39 AM
    . . . . .
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 02:31 AM
    Try The French Revolution: A Study In Democracy, by Nesta Webster The bolsheviks and every other 19th/20th century revolutionary socialist group was intimately familiar with the French revolution. The jacobins, the French revolutionary socialists, were their heroes. This article may also be of interest: https://mises.org/library/messianic-communism-protestant-reformation
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 02:22 AM
    From the description: That's certainly true; one need only look at the way that American/British historians treat the history of communism to see where sympathies lie. And then there are terms like "industrial democracy." What does that mean I wonder...
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 02:14 AM
    Ah, that reminds me, there's an interesting book called Former People, about the life (or otherwise) of the old aristocracy post-revolution. It's built around excerpts of the diaries of members of several important families (or families which were important before being declared non-people). History in general is often unsavory, the story of conquest and what follows, but I have never read anything as shockingly inhuman as what I've read about the bolshevik revolution, or the French.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 02:07 AM
    There seems to be some confusion; allow me to clarify: 1. You endorse an ideology fit only for chimpanzees, which has a huge amount of blood and misery on its hands. 2. I am mocking the incompetence of historical advocates of that ideology, who were liquidated by more competent chimp-socialists. 3. I am wishing that your uniquely inept brand of chimp-socialism had won, as then civilized persons could have restored order.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 01:56 AM
    Thanks for the tip, I'll definitely check it out. For a broad history, which isn't pro-bolshevik, as most of the histories are, I'd suggest Richard Pipes' The Russian Revolution.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 01:45 AM
    :confused: If I had participated in the Russian revolution, I'd be over 100 years old, as would you... The point is that your "non-Marxoid" socialism is no less objectionable than any other kind, such as Lenin's. When the chips are down, the "anarchist" socialists have a history of endorsing the guy who starves millions of people to death. Birds of a feather
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 01:32 AM
    Not born yet (1917)
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 01:29 AM
    Civilized humans
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 01:20 AM
    How many churches have been desecrated by Muslims? How many have been desecrated by angry yoots with names like Fritz and Giorgio? Europe, like its little brother on this side of the ocean, has a problem. But it isn't Muslims, in the same way as our problem isn't Mexicans (or Chinese, or whoever's the next vote-generating scapegoat).
    25 replies | 239 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 12:51 AM
    Don't forget lack of will. The SRs and every other leftist party, including the ones which modern leftist historians (i.e. historians) call "liberal," licked Lenin's boots, let him crap all over every plank of every party's platform, including his own, and at every step excuses were made, and they kept supporting him: because they said that he was better than the Tsar (or then Kerensky). I personally wish that the SRs or one of the other minor socialist parties had successfully challenged Lenin. Then the Whites would have slaughtered the whole gang, undone the revolution, and restored the market economy and sane government generally (and the Tsar). Lenin, despite, being a psychotic monster, was no dummy; the SRs or anyone else would have been less competent. ...so, you fellas really let us down.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 12:34 AM
    I suggest you go to Florence and look up at the duomo; then tell me that it's worth risking another war.
    25 replies | 239 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 12:21 AM
    Have you ever visited the old continent SS? I wonder if you truly appreciate the value of what you're risking so casually.
    25 replies | 239 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 12:19 AM
    Absurd Bernie's been a lifetime bolshevik. The bolshevik regime collapsed years ago; he must hate the present Russian government like a Jacobite hates the Windsors.
    22 replies | 600 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 12:14 AM
    Wouldn't it be ironic if those who oppose immigration in the name of preserving European civilization end up causing a war which destroys it?
    25 replies | 239 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-09-2019, 12:06 AM
    As long as the EU exists, there can't be another European war. If you get your wish...
    25 replies | 239 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-08-2019, 11:52 PM
    I meant the party in Russia around the time of the revolution. The Socialists-Revolutionaries (SRs) were the only serious opposition to the bolsheviks on the left. Their anarcho-steal-land ideology was fairly appealing to the otherwise apolitical peasants. The bolksheviks held no place at all in the peasants' hearts', which is why they had to go literally conquer the villages. I was going to ask you why your fellows bent over and failed to stop Lenin, but perhaps you aren't familiar with this story.
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-08-2019, 11:46 PM
    Some objections: 1. The decline of Western civilization began long before the sexual revolution of the 60s (or the less well known one of the 20s). The trend with which libertarians should be concerned (ever growing state power) has been in place since the late 18th or early 19th century. The bra-burning was theatrical but unimportant in the grand scheme of things. Sexual depravity is generally a symptom, not a cause, of social decline. For example, during times of extreme crisis in the medieval period in Europe, such as in the wake of the plague, heretical "sexual revolutionaries" often popped up. If you ever saw the film "The Road," about a post-apocalyptic world, you'll recall the line about "fires in the hills and strange chanting." That's just a film, of course, but it reflects a fairly universal human tendency. You might call it the "smoke em while you got em" reflex. Go to any great gallery of medieval paintings and look for the ones depicting orgies (over which various gargoyles and such may be hovering). You'll find they coincide with disasters. 2. Any conclusions about the sexual habits of pre-modern societies are at risk of mistaking theory for practice. The Victorians did not, believe it or not, follow the sexual habits of Victorian ideology. The ruling class entirely ignored the sermonizing from the little old lady at Windsor castle, except in public, when they put on a show for the sake of respectability. Meanwhile, the commoners pretended to care, while otherwise going about their debaucherous business. Queen Victoria's own eldest son, Bertie, of the Marlborough fast set, future King Edward VII, was a notorious womanizer.
    6 replies | 724 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-08-2019, 11:18 PM
    Socialists-Revolutionaries then?
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-08-2019, 10:56 PM
    Thanks So, to which form of Marxoid derangement do you subscribe?
    150 replies | 2208 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    12-08-2019, 10:48 PM
    Certain difficulties with current independence movements notwithstanding, an ideal arrangement long-term might be for the current member states of the EU to dissolve into smaller parts. Spain to Catalonia, Andalusia, etc; Germany to Wurttemberg and Bavaria, etc (maybe even resurrect Prussia); etc. Extreme political decentralization promotes extreme economic competition to the benefit of liberty (state A can't tax the crap out of its people, because they can easily flee to state B). This is the cause of the "European Miracle," the sustained per capita GDP growth that made Europe master of the world, and much to the benefit of the world, until Europe destroyed itself. As to that destruction, extreme political fragmentation also promotes extreme military competition, which explains the difference between these two maps: That's just Germany, mind you; hundreds and hundreds of tiny states, most too small to even represent on that map There were about an order of magnitude fewer states in the world in 1914 than there were in Germany alone a few centuries earlier. This is the trouble; the extreme political decentralization which encourages liberalism destroyed itself through military competition.
    25 replies | 239 view(s)
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