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  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    Today, 07:26 PM
    A sensible psychonaut would readily take ten blotters before they took one gram of meth. Acid's not going to hurt you. Meth will. **Don't Do Meth**
    6 replies | 83 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    Today, 07:09 PM
    Agreed Do as you please, but if ever a boogity boogity were warranted, it would be with bathtub meth.
    6 replies | 83 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    Today, 07:07 PM
    It won't win the mid-terms or 2020 if the voters act sensibly. So, of course, it will win..
    9 replies | 134 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    Today, 06:28 PM
    The eagle person, she-eagle, something or other, what's her name? ...I forget. Anyway, I guess he/she/it didn't understand.
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    8 replies | 133 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 02:41 PM
    Most likely, nothing happens, but I wouldn't be totally surprised if something did, despite both being NATO members. Turks and Greeks really hate each other.
    5 replies | 162 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 02:32 PM
    Yes, money printing never affects all prices equally and simultaneously; the new money begins its life in a specific place and gradually spreads, raising prices unequally and at different times in different sectors, advantaging earlier users of the money over later users (Cantillon effects). This is the only reason it causes problems in the first place. If everyone woke up tomorrow to find that all of their cash balances had magically increased one-million-fold, there would be no change in relative prices, no change in the production structure, no bubble, no redistribution of wealth, and consequently no point in printing the money in the first place.
    43 replies | 830 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 02:26 PM
    Yes, an ethical claim, contra a factual claim. A factual claim is a claim about something existing in empirical reality, something which can be empirically verified. "Look," I say while pointing to the dog in front of us, "the dog has four legs." I am referring to something existing in empirical reality, which you can verify with your own eyes. Not so with "Look at that car, Bob owns it." Look at what? All that's there is a car. There is nothing about the car which indicates who owns it. No one can empirically verify who owns it. Ownership is a concept, not a property of physical things. As for your several excerpts about the nature of law, they are entirely beside the point. Whether law is imposed from above, from the armchair, out of pure theory, or emerges from below, ala the common law, it consists of ethical statements ("someone should or should not do this or that"), not statements of fact ("something is or is not the case"). Likewise, however the specific legal rules are formulated (purely mechanistically or otherwise), they remain ethical not factual statements. As for Hoppe's claim that all ethical systems are sets of rules governing property rights, it is, once again, both true and totally irrelevant. The point is that argumentation ethics fails, contrary to all of your/Hoppe's assertions, to prove that only libertarian property rules can be advanced in argument without contradiction.
    78 replies | 3236 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 01:31 PM
    To add a little meat to the bones, what would you say to the following method: There's still a teacher, but his job in neither to lecture nor drink coffee while the students gossip while trying to look busy do an in-class activity. Rather, his job would be to (a) assign readings based on his expertise in the subject, (b) moderate an online forum, where students could ask questions or discuss things among themselves , and (c) create and grade whatever assessments he thinks are appropriate (exams, essays, etc). What's cut out is class time itself, as well as the pure waste that is the time going to/from class or doing related administrative tasks. The teacher:student ratio would be much lower, with the result that costs would be lower and/or the school could pay higher salaries per teacher, to obtain better teachers. And of course the time not spent in class makes possible more reading, lengthier/more complex reading assignments from the teacher. For instance, instead of 3 hours in-class and 6 hours of independent reading, you would have 9 hours of independent reading.
    8 replies | 133 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 12:52 PM
    Politician says: just rename it (STOPP, subsidies to obtain popularity program), and then campaign as a fiscal conservative
    14 replies | 277 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 12:43 PM
    The "ASIA FOR THE ASIANS, AFRICA FOR THE AFRICANS, WHITE COUNTRIES FOR EVERYBODY!..." text that The Count posted earlier is known as "The Mantra." It was written by Bob Whitaker, originator of the term "white genocide" and hero of the white nationalist/supremacist movement. That text is something like a biblical verse for them, like an extract from the "Turner Diaries," or similar pap.
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 12:22 PM
    I'm of the view that people learn best through independent study, specifically by reading, but this runs contrary to prevailing theories of education, which emphasize the need for student-teacher (or student-student) interaction. This latter school of thought is the source of the obsession with student-teacher ratios and of the increasing use of in-class "activities" in lieu of the traditional lecture. I'd call that fluff, with very little educational value, which serves primarily to justify astronomical and ever-increasing educational costs, driven by over-staffed schools. But the traditional lecture format is also flawed. It's a relic of the medieval period, when - before the advent of the printing press - books were extremely expensive, and so it was economical for a professor to read a book, with or without adding his own commentary, to an audience, contra each student purchasing his own copy. This system was obsolete with the advent of cheaply printed paper books, not to mention the ebook and the internet. If reading is truly the essence of education, there is no need for "classes" at all, and the cost of education can be reduced to virtually nothing. So, we can think of three categories of education: 1. The traditional, lecture-based class 2. The new age activities-based class 3. Independent study, with no class at all Which method do you favor?
    8 replies | 133 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 11:50 AM
    I had the misfortune to catch some of Trump's own speech earlier today. He said with a straight face that we have to vote GOP in 2018, or else the Dems will give your money to the government to throw away. ...apparently the multi-hundred billion dollar increase in baseline spending he just cheered through Congress and signed into law doesn't count.
    6 replies | 207 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 11:44 AM
    There was clearly a coordinated effort by Stormfront to influence this forum. IIRC, someone (masochistic enough to actually visit Stormfront) found planning threads there to that effect. And I'm sure they weren't the only group doing this.
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 11:40 AM
    The lack of price inflation since QE started surprised most of us, I think. Part of that might be explained by increasing production, but most of it IMO was the "flight to quality" that bid up the dollar for a period of time (made imports much cheaper), and the fact that most of the new money, for whatever reason, seemed to stay in the financial markets, and not leak out to the "real" economy, to be picked up in CPI data. That's changing now, esp. re the dollar in the forex markets. But, on that note, the ECB is talking about US currency manipulation and how this is hurting European exports (i.e. idiotic protectionism), so I wouldn't be surprised if they ramped up the printing to halt the appreciation of the euro at some point (and because they're probably going to need to do more printing sooner than later anyway, to keep their own bond and other bubbles afloat).
    43 replies | 830 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 11:32 AM
    And many others, yes. At least we also lost, on the other side, the overt Stormfronters; though that's small consolation.
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 11:20 AM
    Speaking of Trump-trolling, some examples, all posted August 25, 2015 by the same poster (not kahless, in this case), p. 201 of the archive: "PJB: Trump's New Nationalism v. the Party of Davos" "Cuban: Without A Killer In The Race, It's Trump's To Lose" "Graham Vows To Beat Trump's Brains Out" "Trump Continues To Pile On Megyn Kelly"
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 10:46 AM
    Ron sent out a letter to supporters saying that the nomination was out of reach (which it most certainly was at that point, based on delegate math), they were suspending campaigning in several states, but they hoped to still influence the platform, etc. This may have been in April, I don't remember exactly. It was after this that Rand endorsed. Apart from that, we found out later (from Doug Wead, IIRC) that the Rand endorsement was the campaign's idea, not Rand's. Romney was threatening to "ruin" Ron with a big negative advertising campaign if he didn't endorse. Ron didn't want to endorse, so they compromised by having Rand endorse, in exchange for a speaking opportunity at the convention. Rand did this for the campaign, for the future of the movement going forward. The narrative that he somehow betrayed Ron is pure nonsense.
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 10:38 AM
    I'm not sure what comment of mine you're referencing, but it's true that money printing doesn't necessarily cause price inflation. It always causes prices to be higher than they otherwise would be, of course, but it may not cause an actual increase, depending on what's happening with production (prices are, crudely, money divided by production). That is, if production is increasing at the same pace as the money supply, prices will remain the same (when they should be falling). Or, if production is increasing faster than the money supply, prices will actually fall (but less than they should). This is the standard Austrian view.
    43 replies | 830 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 08:10 PM
    Allowing them to discharge their debts in bankruptcy is a taxpayer bailout, to the extent that the US government/holds guarantees those loans. Apart from that, bankruptcy is general is nothing but legalized robbery of creditors. The only real solution to the student loan problem is to lower the cost of education. 1. Eliminate all federal and state subsidies (loans or grants) 2. Eliminate accreditation (or eliminate degree requirements for professional licensing, same effect)
    2 replies | 92 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 07:41 PM
    r3volution 3.0 replied to a thread Stocks: Market Crash Looming in Economy & Markets
    High of 2.957 yesterday, back down to 2.93 at the moment Since 2/2 (-666 day when this correction started), we're down about 4.5% in stocks and up about 4% in yields
    3024 replies | 374273 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 07:01 PM
    And he was supporting Trump in the primary, before a single vote was cast (i.e. it was Trump over Rand, not Trump over Hillary). Anyway, yea, cancer, which is unfortunate, but I'm done with him politically: same with Woods and Rockwell.
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 06:51 PM
    Don't forget the mustachioed fellow on the left:
    13 replies | 184 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 06:18 PM
    Some of Rand's harshest critics at RPF became Trump's greatest cheerleaders. summer 2012 - summer 2015: "Rand's 99% libertarian record isn't good enough, he endorsed Romney after Ron dropped out, purity or bust!" late 2015-present: "Trump's 99% unlibertarian record doesn't matter, he pisses off TV characters I dislike, MAGA!" Tom Woods, Justin Raimondo, Lew Rockwell, and a number of others jumped off the same cliff. Sad!
    466 replies | 5608 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 05:46 PM
    Anyone with a basic understanding of economics should be able to see the structural problems in this economy that Schiff talks about. Getting the timing right is another matter, and he's been wrong about the timing (for the collapse of the bond bubble et al) for several years. That said, I think we're getting close. I don't think the Fed will be able to do a repeat of QE1/2/3 without crushing the dollar and bonds. And I don't think we'll have to wait very long to test that prediction, maybe a year.
    43 replies | 830 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 05:29 PM
    The end result (multiple ethnically homogeneous states in lieu of one multi-ethnic state) isn't so bad, but the process of getting there is. Iraq and Libya, with or without any further foreign intervention, will be in a state of civil war for years to come. The thing about nationalistically minded groups is that they're really only interested in their self-determination; they tend not to respect other groups' alleged right to the same. This makes for less than amicable divorces.
    7 replies | 302 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 05:21 PM
    Tax costs and welfare benefits aren't equally distributed. What will John do if there's a politician offering to lower his taxes while increasing his welfare benefits?
    29 replies | 430 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 11:38 PM
    I apologize for quoting myself, but contemplate this: What makes the market work? Is it a set of rules written somewhere by the SEC or some other useless agency? No, it is self-interest.
    29 replies | 430 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 11:29 PM
    Therein lies the problem. Constitutions are ink on paper. Any system which relies on the sovereign(s) being bound by ink on paper will not last. If one wants to affect the behavior of those with the ultimate decision-making power, one must rely on self-interest.
    29 replies | 430 view(s)
  • r3volution 3.0's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 10:28 PM
    The problem with this plan is that this electorate has the same perverse incentives as the universal suffrage electorate. For instance, if we have 100 million of these non-welfare-receiving-and-tax-paying voters, 51 million of them have the same incentive to loot the other 49 million as the majority in a universal suffrage system have to loot their own minority. In other words, non-welfare-receiving-and-tax-paying voters have an incentive to become welfare-receiving-and-non-tax-paying-voters. Of course, the difference is supposed to be that, as soon as the 51 million non-welfare-receiving-and-tax-paying voters vote themselves welfare, they lose the right the vote, and their recent victims reverse the policy, but that doesn't really work in practice. First, if that did happen (the 51 million voting themselves welfare did indeed lose the right to right), you'd just have a "second round" of the same behavior (i.e. 51% of the 49 million would now do the same thing to their own minority as the 51 million had done to them), and so on. It's incredibly unstable. Second, and most importantly, it's not at all likely that the 51 million (the majority of the electorate, with control of government) would allow themselves to be disenfranchised in the first place. Ultimately, all constitutional provisions, including those defining the electorate, are a matter of legislation and (perhaps more insidiously) judicial "interpretation." Guess what kind of judges the 51 million will have appointed: the kind who will disenfranchise them once they vote themselves welfare, or the kind who won't? And this is apart from any genuine amendment process, which might also undermine the system (with the welfare-seeking majority of voters obviously having the edge in seeking such an amendment). Recognizing that incentives drive politics and that those with the best incentives ought to rule is crucial, but this system won't quite work.
    29 replies | 430 view(s)
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