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  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-10-2020, 12:05 AM
    The trouble I have with this is how much time before it's just stalling? This is never specified. In the course of life events unrelated to Q or DC, I have come to realize that the deepest and most insidious form of rebellion (against God) is one that looks exactly like obedience... except that it never, ever comes to fruition. When asked about when the work will be complete the rebels always say, "These things take time." When asked about progress, they always say, "Trust us. We're making progress." But progress itself is never defined. There is no actual path from the present state-of-affairs to completion. There are no milestones and certainly no progress checks. "It takes time" can just mean, "We're never going to do it, but we'll keep saying that, 'We're trying. Be patient. It just takes time.'" Could the last 2,000 years of "Jesus is coming. Trust us and be patient. These things take time." be the very rebellion spoken of in 2 Thessalonians 2? What is holding up the return of someone who has "all power in heaven and earth"?? That doesn't even make logical sense. Anyway, I hope I'm wrong about Q&ct and I hope I'm wrong about the last 2,000 years of stagnation of the church and the human race. I hope Q&ct are the patriots that they have presented themselves to be and I hope that those who claim to follow Jesus actually do. What I know for sure is that somebody "in the ranks" is lying and inexplicable delays that go on long enough are tantamount to out-and-out rebellion. Judas is hiding among us.
    33 replies | 829 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-07-2020, 11:09 PM
    Yeah, overt revenge against the US is a fool's errand. There are so many conflicting/inconsistent reports about the attack on the Al Asad Airbase that I don't know what to make of it. If it was, as advertised, an attempted overt strike against the US military, then Iran's leadership has no strategic sense whatsoever. It seems to me likely that the reality is more complicated.
    26 replies | 399 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-07-2020, 09:53 PM
    "You couldn't make this stuff up. Well, whoever's writing the Simulation is making it up." This guy is a riot!! How have I never heard of him??
    269 replies | 4991 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-07-2020, 09:50 PM
    Saved the day... +rep!
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-07-2020, 09:31 PM
    You say that like it's a BAD thing...
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-06-2020, 02:53 PM
    I imagine there must be a map of the Middle East in the Oval Office glue-sticked onto a dart-board. Each morning, the Prez, VP and Joint Chiefs walk in for the daily briefing. After a brief bit of formalities, somebody is chosen to take a turn at throwing a single dart at the dartboard. Above the dartboard hangs a sign: "Who shall we blame for 9/11 today?" Edited to add the punchline: Saudia Arabia and Israel are blacked out with marker and darts landing in those zones get zero points, of course.
    18 replies | 440 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-06-2020, 02:34 PM
    +1
    30 replies | 142 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-05-2020, 04:15 PM
    IRL Gran Torino, LOL! On a moral level, I'm starting to see that this kind of thing is not actually wrong. When your neighbors engage in illegal, harmful and risky behavior then lie about it when the police show up to investigate, why shouldn't you be able to "lie" about what you did? (Or "allegedly" did, since they were "paying attention to the road", right?) Trouble-makers and liars hate being called on their lies and sometimes the only way to do it is through "illegal" methods, that is, being willing to step outside the boundaries that we're all supposed to be following. Thanks for sharing!
    19 replies | 367 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-05-2020, 02:36 PM
    Oh, yes, the world of YT comments... they remind me of the chit-chat that must have rippled through the crowds watching people being fed to the lions in the Roman coliseum. "Oh, he definitely had it coming, just look at his face, what a lowlife!"
    9 replies | 236 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-05-2020, 02:34 PM
    Yep. Reminds me of a typical "discipline session" from childhood where Granny is the child and the cop is the parent. He's just itching for the excuse to deploy force and when she says, "I'm not going to sign the ticket" (a purely procedural "offense"), he immediately escalates to arrest without even skipping a beat. That's just nuts. Her response was "dumb" in the sense that it was predictably going to receive a maximally forceful reply from the cop (I'm surprised a million cruisers didn't arrive to back him up, as they usually do) but this line of reasoning directly contradicts the narrative by which all these nanny laws are sold in the first place -- "It's just a polite and civilized matter of keeping the paperwork up-to-date, no need to get all dramatic about how the police would use 'deadly force' to enforce a violation, here. Just do your paperwork and we don't need to worry about any of that..." Bull-hockey.
    9 replies | 236 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-04-2020, 11:56 AM
    I was on the "China is smart"-bandwagon for almost 10 years until I saw this headline: China to rewrite Quran, Bible to fit 'socialist values' So, yeah, they're just stupid, after all. +1
    22 replies | 490 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-04-2020, 11:40 AM
    I've noticed this term being thrown around from the pulpit at more than one church (quite a few churches, actually) on many occasions and I'm starting to get irritated with this "trend", if you can call it that. First of all, this term is not used in any English translation of the Bible. That alone should be enough to bring pause to any pastor or other church leader who thinks this is a great phrase or term by which to refer to God. While it's not necessarily blasphemous to refer to God in some way other than the biblical appellations, extra caution must always be exercised when referring to God ad libitum. And this phrase, in particular, is an object lesson in why that is the case. Note that "God of the universe" is a close cousin to "god of this world" which is an appellation by which Scripture refers to the devil! Satan absolutely seeks to have the title "god of the universe" applied to himself and, when the antichrist is revealed, his wish will be fulfilled, at least, in part. (See 2 Thessalonians 2). In short, a closet Satanist sitting next to you in the pew could whole-heartedly sing praises to "the 'God' of the universe." The phrase "God of the universe" is also closely related to an occult name for "God," a name used by the Freemasons: "Great (or Grand) Architect of the Universe." Some people speculate that this term -- which becomes the acronym GAOTU -- is actually a reference to a goat-headed deity, like Baphomet. If you think this all sounds like making something out of nothing, you can be sure you are mistaken about the propensity of the occult for word-games. I won't subject the forum to the finer points of occult word-games but let's suffice it to say that a careful investigation of, say, some of the top-40 popular music videos (and associated lyrics) will net many of these kinds of word-games being used by the occult to "wink and nod" at one another. American culture has become shot through with occult symbolism and word-games, which is to say, it has become shot through with Satanic symbolism and word-games. That the vast bulk of the public is clueless about this is, of course, excusable. But what's the excuse for Christians, especially church leadership?
    1 replies | 105 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-03-2020, 10:12 PM
    This is an incident from several months ago so people may have already seen it. I'm posting it here because it just made me realize that this is a picture-perfect illustration of the libertarian counter-argument against police-state nanny laws. "Oh, it's just a matter of keeping the paperwork on vehicles up-to-date." No, it is absolutely not just some polite question of keeping paperwork up-to-date. Every single statute and administrative rule on the books, without exception, is its own loaded gun (and taser, pepper-spray, canine, hell, entire police cruiser) pointed directly at every single citizen. To say otherwise is a blatant lie and incidents like this prove it. You can fault grandma because "she should have known better." But I look at it the other way: These damn killers in cop uniforms are dumber than oxen and deserve to be treated like oxen because that's how they act. The real issue is the police departments -- and the statutory system that creates them -- that keep these dangerous animals around and even sick them onto private citizens. Since the American establishment is cock-sure that it wants to play Old Testament, I say it's time to bring back Moses:
    9 replies | 236 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-03-2020, 09:01 PM
    That's what drove the boom in HFT back in the day... it's a "no-lose" formula since you are using physically faster electronic communication channels to beat other stock orders to the punch. By moving the stock up a penny (or whatever) beforehand and then selling immediately to the next order in line to be processed (which they already knew was going to be placed), the HFT firm makes "guaranteed profit" on every transaction. Lots of small, but guaranteed, profits can be worth more than larger, riskier profits. Machine-learning based HFT extends this methodology into predictive space. Since the machine-learning algorithm can be tuned for aggression, they can afford to take some losses, just as long as it makes more profits than it does losses. They just train the model to hit the profit-to-loss ratio they want to achieve and it will have that level of aggressiveness "baked-in". Since training ML models is (relatively) cheap, I guess that they just keep training new models on a periodic basis (monthly, weekly, maybe even daily). This allows them to just keep dialing in the level of aggression they want to maintain.
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-03-2020, 08:20 PM
    Agreed. That's precisely what it is. There is an entire ecosystem of criminal actors who are "free-riding" in the anarchic grey-zone created by the Wild West legal mentality of DC regarding its own spying. When the nation-state is running roughshod over its own legal system, you can be sure there will be an enormous contingent of shadowy mercenaries right in their wake, using exactly the same tools and methods, just on a smaller scale.
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-03-2020, 08:17 PM
    That's tough to quantify. I think of it more like "micro-profits"... what they're doing is the same concept as HFT, but it's adding a layer of prediction on top. Instead of waiting for you to place a stock buy or sell order and then beating you to the punch (old-school HFT), the idea is to predict when you're about to place an order and, once again, beat you to the punch. But the applicability of this predictive form of HFT is far broader and more flexible, so you can "steer" it to target specific sectors, specific types of activity, and so on. It can do everything that old-school HFT can do, and much more besides. But the profit in each individual transaction may be pennies. The idea is that you're performing such an enormous volume of these transactions every day that the profits stack up through sheer volume. Boring but ingenious in its own way.
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-03-2020, 12:17 PM
    Agreed. The issue I have is that, in addition to false understanding of the generality of AI, most people lack an understanding of just how powerful narrow AI really is. This understanding matters in areas such as digital privacy. Part of the reason nobody cares about their digital privacy very much is that they imagine that they have some intuitive understanding of how they sort of just "blend in to the crowd" and so it really doesn't matter if the big companies collect all this data, there are just too many people. This is absolutely false. Not only are the ML algorithms being run by the big advertisers (Google, doubleclick, etc.) able to track large data-vectors containing bioinformatics regarding your present state (location, activity, etc.) in real-time, they have moved past that to applying predictive analytics to these data-vectors. In short, they know where you're going to be and what you're going to be doing before you do!! None of that has anything to do with Skynet or HAL-9000, it has to do with GPU's performing countless petaflops of matrix multiplications on data-points siphoned (freely) from your real-time tracking device and from the same devices owned and operated by billions of people around the globe. They don't need HAL-9000 and I don't even think they want it... what they want is more like Kitt from Knight Rider, but evil (Karr but not fully autonomous, I guess?) They = the globalists, in case it isn't obvious. True. But I think caution is required. We are entering a new phase of "force multiplication" where the old Moore's law is less important than how it is speeding itself up. I mean this metaphorically... the physical limits are becoming less important as the algorithmic designs become more and more efficient. At some point, we will not even need a "physics roadmap for computation" (such as Moore's law) because we will be able to just throw brute-force ML simulation of material properties at the problem until the machines spit out the right material/process needed to move down to the next smaller, more power-efficient process. I see this as a virtuous circle, not a vicious circle, but I still worry that many people in the wider public are not comprehending the true ramifications of this to their day-to-day lives. We shouldn't be so comfortable with all this data just being siphoned away without consent for unknown and unspecified uses. Digital data lasts basically forever. I don't think society has actually adjusted to this new reality and that has me worried. </soapbox>
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-03-2020, 12:05 PM
    Not in the usual sense of stock-trading, no. But mathematically, the stock market graph looks a lot like a chaotic physical system, for example, grains of seed bouncing through a threshing-machine. If you "squint", it basically looks random. But it isn't completely random. If you look at the graphs very, very closely, they are not completely unpredictable, just as the path of a grain of seed bouncing through a threshing-machine is not completely unpredictable if you have a very high resolution, high frame-rate film of its motion. What these ML-based finance houses are doing is applying machine learning (Big Data) methods to the trajectories of the stock prices so that any non-randomness in their motions can be extracted and exploited. While humans have been trying to do this for decades, the fact is, humans are just too slow and inefficient. This is machine work. Once you have two or more HFT firms doing this competitively, what starts to happen is that they are collectively transforming the stock price graphs into actually random trajectories. Each firm is competing to have a slightly better ML algorithm that can notice patterns missed by the others. And so on. This is why they're so secretive. Their in-house, trade-secret formula for extracting non-randomness from the stock price movements is literally a money-printing machine and it only works if nobody (outside the firm) knows its formula. If another firm comes to know the formula, that other firm can just incorporate it into their own ML trading algorithm and moot the other firm's moves in the market, forcing them to back to the drawing-board.
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 11:38 PM
    You sound a bit like my 5-years-ago self. I encourage you to look into the SOTA in ML a little deeper, especially in finance. I happen to know that there are HFT firms based in Chicago that are using dedicated, hardware-accelerated ML algorithms (of unknown design, this is strictly trade-secret stuff, I'm sure the CIA itself is jealous of the INFOSEC this stuff is wrapped under) for the purposes of trend-trading. They are hiring a lot of FPGA developers and this is how I know that this is going on and that they're making a lot of money doing it (FPGA developers aren't cheap and hiring a small army of them to work in a finance company so you can keep the IP 100% in-house trade-secrets tells you that somebody has hit a gold-vein). I'm not disagreeing with anything in your post, just consider this one of those insider tips you've been waiting for...
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 10:50 PM
    We are heading for a sea-change in the way that software (and even hardware) is created. See Andrej Karpathy's blog post regarding Software 2.0 (although it has some technical jargon, it's mostly accessible for a non-technical audience, I highly recommend reading this blog-post to anybody curious about the future of the computer industry, especially the software industry). I work in the hardware side of things and I will point you to two images that, to my mind, dramatically illustrate the changes that machine-learning has already been making for years in hardware design. First, look at this die-shot of an Intel Haswell CPU (SOTA circa 2014). If you squint and use your imagination a little, it kind of looks like a top-down satellite photo of a city's street-grid. Everything is laid out in very orderly, rectilinear lines. By contrast, here is a die-shot of a recent Intel CPU architecture (Kaby Lake) which is still currently selling in various devices. If you look closely in the upper-left region of the die, you will notice that there's a kind of wavy pattern that looks more like the surface of a lake than like a city's street-grid. This is the result of machine-learning algorithms optimizing the layout of countless wires in the top layer of the CPU. In fact, if you look closely at the rest of the die, you will notice that these "wavy, non-grid" patterns are present all over the die, even though they are surrounded by grid-like structures. This visually demonstrates the growth of machine-learning algorithms in CPU design, a trend you can be sure is only going to increase, faster and faster. The moral of the story is this: don't fear robots and AI. As someone in this thread already pointed out, we will need people to program the AI, even if "programming" really starts to look something more like training an animal due to the increased sophistication of AI algorithms and robotics. The fear-mongering needs to go away. AI will do for the human brain what the internal combustion-engine did for human muscles. In the 19th-century, as much as 80% of Americans worked in agriculture. Today, the main health problem facing most Americans is keeping off unwanted weight. Most people don't have to engage in manual labor to earn a paycheck. If you want a work-out, go to the gym. AI will free us from the blind rote of filling out spreadsheets (for example), so we can think about higher things instead. For some people, that might be philosophy. For others, it might be theology. For some of us, it might be RPF... :cool: - The same sort of "wavy" pattern would be present in die-shots of all of the CPU's layers. There are around 30 or so layers in a typical consumer CPU like this.
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 09:08 PM
    See my update to previous post. It's not so much about Wolff as it is about fleshing out the motives of the various actors involved. Whether or not Trump actually bid Epstein out of this property as described, the narrative of a "good relationship gone sour" makes a lot of sense to me given the many existing photos of Trump and Epstein together. If Epstein ever offered an underage girl to Trump (and it seems that he did, based on Trump's "younger side" quote), Trump would have immediately understood that Epstein was actually a wolf in sheep's clothing and would have retaliated accordingly. In my opinion.
    524 replies | 24961 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 08:58 PM
    Wow, the first news article I've read in a while that actually makes some sense: Daily Mail: 'Trump blew whistle on Jeffrey Epstein'; Pedophile's threat to expose President 'as a financial fraud' after he 'stole' his $125M mansion led to then-tycoon outing the pedophile to cops Reality truly is stranger than fiction... Update: Just realized this was published back in July (I stumbled across it presented as a breaking news item). Anyway, this clarifies a lot of things for me. If I had to guess the back-story to the Trump-Epstein relationship, Epstein made friends with Trump with intentions to target him as he targeted many similar wealthy and influential individuals. He partied with Trump and vice-versa. At some point, he made "the offer" to Trump. I think this is why, later on, Trump made the remark about Epstein liking some women "on the younger side." I think Trump immediately understood what was up (peddling underage women to a wealthy man as blackmail bait), and decided that it was time to turn the tables on Epstein. One bad turn deserves another. This is all in my opinion. The facts are difficult to pin down due to the extreme scarcity of tangible evidence.
    524 replies | 24961 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 08:14 PM
    You have more faith in humanity than I can muster. While I know that the number of people submitting to the machine is less than 100%, it's not much less, and the few that have not submitted do not seem to have any form of organization or even basic cooperation. Truly "sheep without a shepherd."
    524 replies | 24961 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 07:43 PM
    This whole "Ghislaine is traveling the globe, carefree in the knowledge she is safe because of all the dirt she has"-narrative is simply laughable. Sometimes I wonder if the entire globe has become mentally retarded. I don't say that lightly, either... I am running out of alternative explanations. Have people really never thought through what power actually is? "She'll expose them." Really? How about this: she'll be replaced with a body double (or already was a long time ago). They've done it before. "They can't get away with that because of <something to do with identity papers>." The people in power are the ones who issue passports, licenses and other identifying documents, duh! "If she dies, her lawyer(s) would just mail off documents with incriminating information to the big media outlets." (a) Her lawyers won't do squat unless they want to end up like this guy and (b) the big media outlets are all owned and operated by the very people you think that Maxwell is going to "expose" by mailing them incriminating documents. You people (the ignorant, gullible masses) deserve to be derided but you are so naive that it's pitiable!
    524 replies | 24961 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-02-2020, 07:08 PM
    +REP!!
    44 replies | 1154 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    01-01-2020, 12:28 PM
    A statement under oath could be defamation. A statement made by a journalist in the course of their professional work (not in an expression of their private opinion) could be defamation. A public characterization from a professional related to the practice of their profession (e.g. a psychiatrist expressing a psychiatric opinion about a third-party) could be defamation. An entertainment radio personality performing a show in which he makes claims regarding the Sandy Hook parents being crisis actors is not defaming anyone or harming their reputation in any way. Alex Jones is an entertainer and he has made his claims in the course of performing his entertainment art. I don't even listen to Jones's show but it is obvious that no one is being harmed in the course of Alex Jones spouting whatever nonsense he likes in his radio show. It appears that we are likely shifting to the old British/Euro definition of libel and defamation where every private opinion or artistic expression is subject to retaliation through the courts. I will concede the inevitability of this shift but it's not going to improve anything, far from it. The rich and powerful are already protected behind rings of steel. I don't see why they need the billy-club of maximalist libel & defamation protections to shut up every form of criticism or dissent, as well. "This isn't about the rich and powerful, it's about ordinary people who were harmed by Alex Jones." If you believe that, I've got some ocean-front property in Arizona that I'd like to sell you...
    50 replies | 1515 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    12-31-2019, 11:13 PM
    MERRY SKYNET
    15 replies | 340 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    12-31-2019, 10:45 PM
    I will no longer eat at any fast-food burger joint that sells an "incredible/impossible/whatever" burger. Over lunch about 6 months ago, I stopped at Carl's Jr. I was in a hurry, grabbed the bag and drove off. To my shock and horror, I realized after the first bite that this was certainly not a beef burger. I contemplated turning back but I had to get back to work in a hurry. The taste was tolerable, but it wasn't beef and no one who has eaten a beef burger could confuse it with beef. I could either finish the burger, or skip lunch, so I figured I might as well finish it. If that were the end of the story, well, I might still eat at Carl's Jr. from time to time, despite their error. But the real trouble started the next day. It turns out that whatever is in that "incredible" patty is basically indigestible and passed in a brick having approximately the consistency of drywall. As you can imagine, that was not a happy day for me. Not eating that dog-food ever, not even by mistake. The mere possibility that a MW line-cook can accidentally slap down the wrong patty is enough to nix my visits to your burger joint until that incredible, indigestible carpet-foam not even suitable for animal consumption is taken off the menu. Note that I'm not a beef snob. I've eaten veggie burgers at high-end restaurants before. Spiced well, they taste quite delectable (though, obviously, not beef), and they are digestible. The fast-food chains have another agenda, so sayonara BK, CJ and anybody else who starts trying to peddle your foam-industry recycle as "food". And it's a goodbye without tears, so don't be thinking "Oh, he'll be back." I shouldn't be eating fast-food, anyway.
    4 replies | 345 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    12-31-2019, 06:44 PM
    It's not as simple as proving false claims. See Libel & Defamation from Freedom Forum Institute. The USSC itself does not have unanimity on the subject. From the article: I concur with Black on this point. Jones has consistently characterized his business as a current-events entertainment show. In this respect, it is no different from any of countless such radio shows and podcasts around the country, many of which make far more extreme claims in their shows than Jones does. The facts of the Sandy Hook shooting are more or less irrelevant to this case. The only facts that actually matter are whether Alex Jones is an entertainment artist or a journalist associated with a reputable media outlet. In the course of performing his art, he has the first amendment right to claim that the Sandy Hook parents are Martians who teleported to Earth from a starbase on Mars and are the first wave in a global invasion by Martians, if he likes. That's what the First Amendment does, it protects the artistic and political expression of individuals, even when that expression is offensive to others. I have noticed that Jones is a bit more measured in his tone since Sandy Hook and it appears that this event has been a learning experience for him. His show does have tremendous ancillary influence on the public and it appears that some extremists got themselves whipped up in a furor by Jones's rhetoric. But Jones can't be legally liable for anything that some random listener (of unknown mental health status) might choose to do, inspired by something they heard Jones say. The unfortunate reality is that we have a lot of mental illness in this country and people will act out for the flimsiest of reasons. In any case, purely as a question of moral judgment, Jones should take into account the unintentional influence he may have on some of the more unbalanced people who listen to his show. But a defamation lawsuit is ridiculous in this case. It's just a politically-motivated (and financed, no doubt) hit job.
    50 replies | 1515 view(s)
  • ClaytonB's Avatar
    12-30-2019, 08:06 PM
    Jones is so frustrating. On the one hand, he marginalizes himself by going on crazy rants and venting a lot of things as fact that, even when they turn out later to be true, were not well supported by any evidence, so the public just tunes him out as "a wacko." On the other hand, he has moments of astounding lucidity. From the linked podcast: It is key to realize that what drives spiritual wickedness -- that is, the real witchcraft practiced by Satanists and devil-worshippers, which always manifests as horrendous, unspeakable crimes -- is the will to be God. So, it is pride that underlies all these other crimes, like the Epstein network and (in all probability) the network surrounding Marina Abramovic. As horrific as the practices of pedophilia, pedosadism, pedovorism, pedovampirism (and so on) are, they are really just a means to an end. The end goal is explained in Isaiah 14 in Lucifer's will to vaunt his throne above the stars of heaven. These people actually believe they are making themselves into God by torturing and murdering children.
    2 replies | 122 view(s)
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