• phill4paul

      by Published on 08-17-2014 12:20 PM

      After police in Kenosha, Wis., shot my 21-year-old son to death outside his house ten years ago — and then immediately cleared themselves of all wrongdoing — an African-American man approached me and said: “If they can shoot a white boy like a dog, imagine what we’ve been going through.”

      I could imagine it all too easily, just as the rest of the country has been seeing it all too clearly in the terrible images coming from Ferguson, Mo., in the aftermath of the killing of Michael Brown. On Friday, after a week of angry protests, the police in Ferguson finally identified the officer implicated in Brown's shooting, although the circumstances still remain unclear.

      I have known the name of the policeman who killed my son, Michael, for ten years. And he is still working on the force in Kenosha.
      Yes, there is good reason to think that many of these unjustifiable homicides by police across the country are racially motivated. But there is a lot more than that going on here. Our country is simply not paying enough attention to the terrible lack of accountability of police departments and the way it affects all of us—regardless of race or ethnicity. Because if a blond-haired, blue-eyed boy — that was my son, Michael — can be shot in the head under a street light with his hands cuffed behind his back, in front of five eyewitnesses (including his mother and sister), and his father was a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel who flew in three wars for his country — that’s me — and I still couldn’t get anything done about it, then Joe the plumber and Javier the roofer aren’t going to be able to do anything about it either.

      Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/sto...#ixzz3AfCIx69c
      by Published on 08-13-2014 06:09 PM
      Article Preview

      While serving as a U.S. Marine on patrol in Afghanistan, we wore desert camouflage to blend in with our surroundings, carried rifles to shoot back when under enemy attack, and drove around in armored vehicles to ward off roadside bombs.
      We looked intimidating, but all of our vehicles and equipment had a clear purpose for combat against enemy forces. So why is this same gear being used on our city streets?

      On Saturday, a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown, an unarmed black man. In the days that have followed, the town with a population about 21,000 has seen massive protests in response to the shooting, as some witnesses said Brown had his hands up when he was killed.

      Putting aside what started the protests for ...
      by Published on 08-05-2014 09:42 AM
      Article Preview

      Two weeks worth of breakdown. This just goes to show that there is nothing "isolated" about police abuse. That there are not just "a few bad apples." http://www.reddit.com/r/Bad_Cop_No_D...ts_from_72714/

      July 20-26th:http://i.imgur.com/xul5pUg.png



      July 27th - Aug. 2nd:http://i.imgur.com/jvexrfE.png

      ...
      by Published on 08-01-2014 10:36 AM

      After an interview with MSNBC's Ari Melber yesterday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky) said he would not return to the network for a long time.

      "I'm thinking it won't be soon. But if they want to apologize for 24 hours for making stuff up about my positions ... and for the lousy lies they've been saying about me for four years, I'll consider it," Paul said to an audience of supporters at the Young Americans for Liberty Conference, according to a Slate report.

      Full story: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/rand-p...170249897.html
      by Published on 07-23-2014 04:39 PM

      Police in Enfield, Connecticut, were ready to arrest one of their own, Matthew Worden, for punching a suspect when it was "neither necessary nor needed." They prepared a 7-page arrest warrant where it sounded like the cop's excuse was that his victim got in the way of his punches, but the state's attorney in Hartford rejected the application because, well, the incident was too complicated to follow.

      Read more... http://reason.com/blog/2014/07/23/co...ent-tries-to-a
      by Published on 07-22-2014 06:32 PM

      By John W. Whitehead
      July 21, 2014

      “What the government is good at is collecting taxes, taking away your freedoms and killing people. It’s not good at much else.” —Author Tom Clancy

      Call it what you will—taxes, penalties, fees, fines, regulations, tariffs, tickets, permits, surcharges, tolls, asset forfeitures, foreclosures, etc.—but the only word that truly describes the constant bilking of the American taxpayer by the government and its corporate partners is theft.

      We’re operating in a topsy-turvy Sherwood Forest where instead of Robin Hood and his merry band of thieves stealing from the rich to feed the poor, you’ve got the government and its merry band of corporate thieves stealing from the poor to fatten the wallets of the rich. In this way, the poor get poorer and the rich get richer. All the while, the American Dream of peace, prosperity, and liberty has turned into a nightmare of endless wars, debilitating debt, and outright tyranny.

      What Americans don’t seem to comprehend is that if the government can arbitrarily take away your property, without your having much say about it, you have no true rights. You’re nothing more than a serf or a slave.

      https://www.rutherford.org/publicati...rations_and_co
      by Published on 07-15-2014 04:51 PM

      Hope the budget cuts go through....

      In the wake of proposed budget cuts that would slash the number of law enforcement officers, the head of the Police Benevolent Association for Miami-Dade County said that the public may have to start taking matters into their own hands.

      “If the mayor’s not going to provide security, then my recommendation, as an experienced law enforcement officer for nearly 40 years, is either buy yourself an attack dog, put bars on your windows and doors and get yourself some firearms because you’re going to have to protect yourselves. We won’t be able to,” John Rivera, president of the Miami-Dade Police Benevolent Association, told WSVN.

      According to the Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez, who proposed the cuts, the county needs
      ...
      by Published on 07-13-2014 11:25 AM

      Theye will not allow even peaceful resistance...

      Grandmother of Three was Convicted of Violating Strange ‘Order of Protection’ for Colonel of the Drone Base

      On July 10, grandmother of three, Mary Anne Grady Flores was sentenced to one year in prison after being found guilty of violating an Order of Protection. A packed courtroom of over 100 supporters was stunned as she was led away, and vowed to continue the resistance.

      These Orders of Protection, typically used in domestic violence situations or to protect a victim or witness to a crime, have been issued to people participating in nonviolent resistance actions at Hancock Air Base since late 2012. The base, near Syracuse NY, pilots unmanned Reaper drones over Afghanistan, and trains drone pilots, sensor operators and maintenance technicians. The orders had been issued to “protect” Colonel Earl Evans, Hancock’s mission support commander, who wanted to keep protesters “out of his driveway.”
      Continued: http://www.popularresistance.org/non...ear-in-prison/
      by Published on 07-06-2014 03:44 PM

      I don't care about the case, but look at this:

      "Among the details police have released is that Harris and his wife, Leanna, told them they conducted Internet searches on how hot a car needed to be to kill a child. Stoddard testified Thursday that Ross Harris had visited a Reddit page called "child-free" and read four articles. He also did an Internet search on how to survive in prison, Stoddard said.

      "Also, five days before Cooper died, Ross Harris twice viewed a sort of homemade public service announcement in which a veterinarian demonstrates on video the dangers of leaving someone or something inside a hot car."

      Stoddard is a police detective. It seems that they know about his web browsing because they seized and searched his computer:

      ...investigators confiscated Harris' work computer at Home Depot following his arrest and discovered an Internet search about how long it would take for an animal to die in a hot car.

      Stoddard also testified that Harris was "sexting" -- is this a word we use in court now? -- with several women on the day of his son's death, and sent explicit pictures to one of them. I assume he knows that by looking at Harris's message history.

      A bunch of this would not be admissible in trial, but this was a probable-cause hearing, and the rules are different for those. CNN writes: "a prosecutor insisted that the testimony helped portray the defendant's state of mind and spoke to the negligence angle and helped establish motive."

      This case aside, is there anyone reading this whose e-mails, text messages, and web searches couldn't be cherry-picked to portray any state of mind a prosecutor might want to portray?
      https://www.schneier.com/blog/archiv...tivity_us.html
      by Published on 07-04-2014 03:17 PM

      As marijuana legalization laws go into effect, the general population is beginning to realize that the more things change the more they stay the same. The average small time marijuana user might not get thrown in a cage for minor possession anymore in states like Washington or Colorado, but prohibition is alive and well in many ways, just as it is for alcohol and other “controlled substances”.
      Heavy taxes and regulations have been placed onto licensed sellers of marijuana, and unlicensed sellers are still forced to operate under risk of incarceration, just as unlicensed moonshiners do nearly a century after the supposed end of alcohol prohibition.

      As with alcohol, the government still wants to continue to use marijuana as an excuse to violate people’s rights and fleece them of their hard earned money. In Washington and Colorado, now that marijuana is legal the police have been creating a new database system that will allow them to get warrants to collect blood from DUI suspects in just 30 minutes, a radical change from the current four hours that it usually takes to obtain a warrant.
      Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/dat...u1p3WrWqt07.99
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