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View Full Version : RP MUST sell his position on Legalizing Hemp to other farming states!




Antonius Stone
01-03-2008, 11:18 PM
IMO the biggest silent issue that could have hands-down won us Iowa is the legalization of industrial hemp. As far as I know none of the other GOP candidates care about Hemp but RP introduced a bill to legalize (http://www.votehemp.com/PR/02-13-07_federal_bill.html).

this is HUGE- if you know anything about hemp then you know that it is an ABSOLUTE BOOM for any and all American farmers and for all domestic manufacturing. This is practically a miracle plant that needs almost no fertilizer, no pesticides/herbicides, increases the yields of other plants when used in crop rotation, replenishes the soil of resources and can quite literally be used to make 80% of all products in the market- You can bet that American farmers will vote hemp and will vote Ron Paul. I think we could have won Iowa if we'd sold the hemp issue as being third most important after Foreign Policy and Fiscal Conservatism.

But we still have a chance. The entire breadbasket might be up for grabs and you know that if we sell our position on hemp, there will be an increase of Paul support. CA, the two Dakotas, Virginia and Kentucky have been trying to legalize hemp for AGES now (I'm sure that there's a bunch of other states i'm missing as well) but the DEA and the republican establishment have been stepping all over them. We need to sell our position on this issue to win votes.

Antonius Stone
01-03-2008, 11:37 PM
bump. this is something important to consider

romeshomey
01-03-2008, 11:38 PM
Agreed....

Another thing to note is, that when farmers grow hemp, it ruins outdoor marijuana crops by causing them to seed. So not only would they be gaining the ability to farm and sell industrialized hemp, but they would be battleing the growing of real outdoor marijuana at the same time.

The pollen from industrialized hemp can ruin an outdoor marijuana crop up to over 5 miles away depending on the wind and outdoor conditions by causing it to seed. In doing so, people wouldn't want to plant marijuana outside because they would know the industrialized hemp crops would ruin their yield.

So +1 for hemp famers, -1 for pot growers.

Also, note to farmers that industrialized hemp is a far better source for alternative fuel than corn.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 12:31 AM
bump

Joe3113
01-04-2008, 12:34 AM
yep

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 12:35 AM
Agreed....

Another thing to note is, that when farmers grow hemp, it ruins outdoor marijuana crops by causing them to seed. So not only would they be gaining the ability to farm and sell industrialized hemp, but they would be battleing the growing of real outdoor marijuana at the same time.

The pollen from industrialized hemp can ruin an outdoor marijuana crop up to over 5 miles away depending on the wind and outdoor conditions by causing it to seed. In doing so, people wouldn't want to plant marijuana outside because they would know the industrialized hemp crops would ruin their yield.

So +1 for hemp famers, -1 for pot growers.

Also, note to farmers that industrialized hemp is a far better source for alternative fuel than corn.

QFT QFT QFT QFT QFT QFT

RUN THAT EVERYWHERE

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 03:14 AM
willie nelson on hemp (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6tA3HxA9oQ)

I think we should try to sway Willie to support RP based on the Hemp position.

blimp.

fj45lvr
01-04-2008, 03:39 AM
I 100% guarantee you that the HEMP issue is a HUGE detriment to PAUL because of ignorance.

very stupid marketing ploy to use that issue IMHO

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 03:42 AM
I 100% guarantee you that the HEMP issue is a HUGE detriment to PAUL because of ignorance.

very stupid marketing ploy to use that issue IMHO

a Hemp legalization bill passed the CA legislature fifty-something to thirty in both houses. only reason it didnt become law is because schwegger didn't sign

Kentucky, Virginia and both Dakotas have been trying to legalize hemp for ages. the knowledge is out there and people are not as stupid as the once were when it comes to hemp because they BUY hemp clothes all the time.

the creation and processing of hemp foods is a multimillion dollar industry and it survives off of imported raw hemp from canada alone

also, how is Hemp advocacy any more detrimental than paul saying on national television that he wants to end the war on drugs?

slamhead
01-04-2008, 03:44 AM
Fringe issue..not important. They and read about it in the canabis magazine.

Oliver
01-04-2008, 03:45 AM
I already imagine O'Reilly's memo ... putting nails into FOX's RP-coffin.

fj45lvr
01-04-2008, 03:57 AM
I already imagine O'Reilly's memo ... putting nails into FOX's RP-coffin.

NO kidding!!!

the hemp issue is certain death.


and those "blinded" by it why don't you throw up some numbers that prove that it is actually a multi-million dollar industry in Canada or anywhere else (I think that is smoke and mirror claims...if it were true there should be some proof to show).

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 04:01 AM
NO kidding!!!

the hemp issue is certain death.


and those "blinded" by it why don't you throw up some numbers that prove that it is actually a multi-million dollar industry in Canada or anywhere else (I think that is smoke and mirror claims...if it were true there should be some proof to show).

its not a multi million dollar industry in canada

its a multi million dollar industry HERE. WE, AMERICANS are the major market for most all hemp goods
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kZTLHEPrMc

the only thing stopping it from becoming a multi BILLION dollar industry is the fact that we have to import the raw mats from canada. by not getting involved in this business, we are in fact throwing the industry away (like we are currently throwing away all our industries) to the chinese

and as I said. Ron Paul has already said he wants to end the war on drugs. how can hemp advocacy be any more "damaging" than saying you want to end the war on drugs on national TV?

let Bill-O attack us on Hemp. american and canadian farmers will then join in on the already massive chorus that laughs its head off at his bull shit

Trassin
01-04-2008, 04:03 AM
If you sign up to be a precinct captain at Voters.RonPaul2008.com and take the necessary actions it calls for, you won't need Ron Paul to sell anything to the farmers because you will have already done it yourself!

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 04:17 AM
If you sign up to be a precinct captain at Voters.RonPaul2008.com and take the necessary actions it calls for, you won't need Ron Paul to sell anything to the farmers because you will have already done it yourself!

excellent point and i've already signed up, but i'm in metropolitan los angeles, far far away from most potential farmers. Also, almost all California farmers are already sold on legalizing hemp so I might as well be preaching to the choir.

over the past 3 years, hemp food sales have averaged a 41% growth rate. click (http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/09-25-2007/0004669759&EDATE=)
I'd expect that figure to be close to 75% if american farmers were allowed to grow it themselves. the industry is currently limited by canadian farmers

Oliver
01-04-2008, 04:19 AM
NO kidding!!!

the hemp issue is certain death.

I guess even the dutch Ron Paul supporters would
agree on this one - given the US moral circumstances.

fj45lvr
01-04-2008, 04:23 AM
let Bill-O attack us on Hemp. american and canadian farmers will then join in on the already massive chorus that laughs its head off at his bull shit


I'd have to see that to believe it. I'd believe much more strongly that BO would have the majority of the public laughing at you.....just tell me what product people are using right now commonly that is made with HEMP??? (and don't think for a minute that COULDS or WOULDS are going to sway anybody).

Like I said before if you could show on paper where the Canucks are raking it in from the industry then that is something CONCRETE instead of the "pie in the sky" pipedream (and the "pipe" part of it is the focus).

Paul understands that the FEDS have no business in the Drug BIZ/enforcement Biz but don't ever think for a moment that he condones or advocates use (quite the opposite, he's just not "down" with violating the constitution and wasting a PILE of money while doing it when the STATES can handle it (which they already do).

PAUL should press the ECONOMIC/monetary policy issue WAY WAY more important than hemp in farming communities and the whole country for that matter.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:06 AM
I'd have to see that to believe it. I'd believe much more strongly that BO would have the majority of the public laughing at you.....just tell me what product people are using right now commonly that is made with HEMP??? (and don't think for a minute that COULDS or WOULDS are going to sway anybody).

Like I said before if you could show on paper where the Canucks are raking it in from the industry then that is something CONCRETE instead of the "pie in the sky" pipedream (and the "pipe" part of it is the focus).

Paul understands that the FEDS have no business in the Drug BIZ/enforcement Biz but don't ever think for a moment that he condones or advocates use (quite the opposite, he's just not "down" with violating the constitution and wasting a PILE of money while doing it when the STATES can handle it (which they already do).

PAUL should press the ECONOMIC/monetary policy issue WAY WAY more important than hemp in farming communities and the whole country for that matter.


Hemp isn't marijuana. It does not produce enough THC to produce medicine or get a person high.

Oliver
01-04-2008, 08:09 AM
Hemp isn't marijuana. It does not produce enough THC to produce medicine or get a person high.

This is true - but the subliminal tone in this thread surely has
nothing to do with "Hemp clothes" or something similar ...

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:13 AM
This is true - but the subliminal tone in this thread surely has
nothing to do with "Hemp clothes" or something similar ...

What lines are you reading between?

This thread is about farming industrialized hemp for alternative fuel and nothing else. There are no lines to read between.

Here is some information on the subject.

We can be energy independent, without nuclear power.
Biomass is the term to describe all biologically produced matter. World production of biomass is estimated at 146 billion metric tons per year, mostly as wild plant growth. Biomass conversion to fuel has proven economically feasible in laboratory tests and continuous operation of pilot plants since 1973. It has a heating value of 5000-8000 BTU/lb, with virtually no ash or sulfur produced by combustion.

About 6% of contiguous U.S. land area cultivated for biomass could supply all our current demand for oil and gas. This is the basis of the emerging concept of "energy farming," wherein farmers grow and harvest crops for biomass conversion to fuels.There is one farm crop that can fill all our energy needs. Hemp is the only biomass resource capable of making America energy independent. Both Thomas Jefferson and George Washington grew hemp. But, under pressure from the oil and timber industries, our government outlawed it in 1938.

Hemp biomass technology can meet our energy needs.
Pyrolysis is the technique of applying high heat to organic matter (lignocellulosic materials) in the absence of air or in reduced air to produce charcoal, condensable organic liquids (pyrolytic fuel oil), non-condensable gasses, acetic acid, acetone and methanol. The process can be adjusted to favor charcoal, methanol, pyrolytic oil or gasoline, at 95.5% fuel-to-feed efficiency. It uses the same technology now used to process crude fossil fuel oil and coal.

Pyrolytic fuel oil has similar properties to #2 and #6 fuel oil and can be transported economically by trucking, creating even more jobs for Americans. Pyrolysis charcoal has nearly the same heating value in BTU as coal, with virtually no sulfur. Charcoal can be transported by rail to power plants generating electricity.

Clean energy for America.
When we use sulfur free charcoal instead of coal, the problems of acid rain will begin to disappear. And when the energy crop is growing it takes in CO2 from the air, and releases oxygen, so when it is burned the CO2 released creates a balanced system. Global greenhouse warming and adverse climactic change will automatically diminish.

Farms -- a natural resource.
Farmers must be allowed to grow an energy crop that produces at least 10 tons per acre in 90-120 days, and grows in all climactic zones in America. Hemp is drought resistant, making it an ideal crop in the dry western regions of the country.

Hemp is one of the best biomass producers on earth: up to 10 tons per acre in about four months. Hemp is pest resistant and can be grown in rotation with food crops or on marginal land,. where food production is not profitable. This energy crop can be harvested with equipment readily available. It can be "cubed" by modified hay cubing equipment, and the cubes are ready for conversion with no further treatment.

Real National Security:
By the year 2000, America will have exhausted 80% of her petroleum reserves. Will we go to war with the Arabs for the privilege of driving our cars? Will we stripmine our land for coal, and poison our air so we can drive our autos an extra 100 years? Will we raze our forests to make fuel? Or will reason prevail? The main argument against using hemp does not hold up to scrutiny: Hemp grown for biomass will not make you high if you smoke it. The 20 to 40 million Americans who smoke pot would loath to smoke such hemp, so the crop is worthless as an intoxicant. In the former Soviet Union, where farmers are free to grow hemp, they tell of students who sneak into the fields to steal some hemp branches. "But they never come back for more."

Only certain strains of hemp, grown under special conditions can produce 'marijuana.' There is virtually THC-free hemp to be grown, but even that is blocked.

During World War II, our supply of hemp for industrial feedstock was cut off by the Japanese. The federal government solved that emergency by suspending marijuana prohibition. Patriotic American farmers were encouraged to apply for licenses to cultivate hemp, and responded enthusiastically. Hundreds of thousands of acres of hemp were grown, without any problems-just benefits.

It is time for our leaders to end our national energy/economic emergency as they once stopped Hitler: Permit our farmers to grow hemp, so America can once again become energy independent and smog free.

http://www.equalrights4all.org/bach/Fuel.html

Oliver
01-04-2008, 08:16 AM
I fully agree with you. But that surely isn't an important topic in the US right
now and in the debates, is it?

So I tend to think that those who endorse the Hemp-Issue, are rather
pushing their own agendas than taking a plausible stance concerning
the Issues that are important to most Americans - am I wrong?

Danny
01-04-2008, 08:18 AM
I'm not completely against this idea, but I can see how it could backfire.

What % of people are actually interested in becoming a hemp farmer? Extremely small. What % of people hear "legalize hemp" and believe that means legalize drugs (which RP is also for)? Probably quite a few.

fj45lvr
01-04-2008, 08:20 AM
Hemp isn't marijuana. It does not produce enough THC to produce medicine or get a person high.

I know and I don't disagree that it could have some good things.


It is however POLITICAL SUICIDE. and further I have not seen a shred of evidence that it is going to become a MORE PROFITABLE enterprise for American farmers.


The thread was about GAINING support.....this would have the OPPOSITE effect guaranteed whether you or I like it or NOT.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:21 AM
I fully agree with you. But that surely isn't an important topic in the US right
now and in the debates, is it?

So I tend to think that those who endorse the Hemp-Issue, are rather
pushing their own agendas than taking a plausible stance concerning
the Issues that are important to most Americans - am I wrong?


It isn't? How much are you paying for gas while the world is saying oil supply is running thin.

Energy isn't an issue when the Northeast is struggling to pay to heat their homes and people can't afford to pump gas into their transportation?

We don't have an environmental issue with carbon gases being emmited into the atmosphere? Deisel fuel made with hemp emits only 1/3 of the pollutants as that of petroleum deisel.

Hemp could save the farmers from having to sell their land to developement or from losing their farms to government forclosure, save our dependancy on foreign petroleum, save people from high heat and travel expenses, and save the environment ALL IN ONE SHOT!

Farmers could make their own deisel fuel to run their machinery if they were allowed to grow hemp. It isn't a difficult process.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:24 AM
I know and I don't disagree that it could have some good things.


It is however POLITICAL SUICIDE. and further I have not seen a shred of evidence that it is going to become a MORE PROFITABLE enterprise for American farmers.


The thread was about GAINING support.....this would have the OPPOSITE effect guaranteed whether you or I like it or NOT.

What? Hemp was the MOST profitable crop for farmers before it was outlawed and was the most profitable farmed crop in Canada in 2006.

-------------

The Manitoba Co-Operator has declared industrial hemp (seed) to have "a better profit outlook than any other crop in 2006." With the breakeven yield for hemp seed at 388 pounds per acre, farmers feel there is plenty of risk buffer, given average Manitoba harvest yields of over 500 pounds per acre. Coupled with the fact that many of region's staple crops are projected to "under-yield" in 2006, this could be industrial hemp's biggest season ever.

http://www.hemperfi.com/2006/04/industrial_hemp_most_profitabl_1.html

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:27 AM
John Ackland sits inside his automotive shop in Craik, Saskatchewan, snacking on an energy bar - made with hemp seeds.

Ackland says the energy bar is chockful of hemp seeds, naturally containing Omega 3s, 6s and 9s in the correct balance for optimal health, as well as the essential nutrient gamma linolenic acid.


"It's very healthy - people eat them for high energy," Ackland said, pointing to the many other hemp products he sells, including flour, heating oil, shampoo, salves, ointments and the "softest hand lotion you've ever put on your hands."


He may sound like a salesman, but he's really a hemp producer, and knows very well how high maintenance a hemp crop can be, particularly at harvest time.


But he also knows it's a very good cash crop that can be processed into a multitude of consumer products that are in demand all over the world - and that's the main reason he continues to grow it.


"In Canada, it's the most profitable crop I can grow, but it's not an easy crop to harvest," Ackland says.


Hemp in Canada currently brings about $10 a bushel, but four years ago the price was higher, Ackland said. His yields have averaged 20 bushels/acre but have been up to 32 bushels/acre on the high end.


Ackland has been farming with his son, Brian, in the Craik region since 1972. After a HempOil Canada farm meeting with Kevin Friesen, the Acklands decided to add hemp to their small grain operation.


Industrial hemp was reintroduced as an alternative crop to Canadian farmers in 1988 after 60 years of being banned from the country. Nearly 40,000 acres of hemp was grown in Canada in 2006, with farmers finding contracts to grow mostly hemp seed.


"There's no place in North America where you can sell the straw," he said, adding the markets are for the seed and oil. Plants in Craik and Manitoba are going up within the next year, so Canada is working with farmers to obtain the most value from the crop.


Markets will remain a problem, Ackland said, because farmers do not want to keep their hemp seed in storage too long. Last year, he added, it took him 14 months to get rid of the previous year's crop.


North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson said one future market opportunity for hemp may be in renewable fuels plants. Proposals for ethanol plants that use cellulose are out there, and the hemp stalks would be an excellent source, Johnson said.


Ackland does sell a small amount of hemp fibre to an individual in the area who uses it to make durable, long-lasting counter tops too.


"Hemp is the second toughest fibre in the world," he said.


Ackland's uncle in Illinois grew 100 acres of hemp for the war effort in 1942, so he said he was aware of what producing a successful crop took before he started.


He doesn't recommend putting the seed into the ground until a contract is in place with a reputable and proven buyer. Winnipeg farmers had a bad experience a few years ago with an American buyer who contracted with producers for the hemp fibre, took their money and "left them high and dry," Ackland said. "This first situation soured everybody on hemp for a time," he added.


"It's important to have the infrastructure in place before you begin growing it. We've been working on the infrastructure for 10 years," Ackland said, adding that agencies such as the DEA have to be on board, too, as well as markets. "You have to be careful. Everybody is out there scrambling for dollars and cents."


Ackland says he doesn't mind sharing a few pointers with prospective producers, even though Canadian farmers will be in direct competition with North Dakota farmers.


"Of course, we would just as soon you not grow it," says Ackland, pointing out how lucrative the crop has been for the country's producers.


His input costs each year are about $35 an acre for seed, and $50 an acre for fertilizer, as well as transportation costs. He hauls his harvested seed by semi 500 miles to market in another province, and it takes him several trips to get it all there.


Farmers in Canada who grow hemp also need to apply for a license, just as they will in North Dakota. They are also required to purchase their seed on an annual basis from a certified seed dealer.


According to the Saskatchewan Hemp Association, some of the seed varieties grown include Fasamo, Finolo and FIN 314. Significant research into varieties is ongoing in Canada.


Ackland said the fields where hemp will be grown need to be fertilized beforehand with anhydrous or other chemical providing nitrogen and phosphorus. "It takes a lot of nitrogen to grow it," he said.


"I do not recommend growing hemp in fields where you have had wild oats. Hemp will not tolerate wild oats. Other than that, it'll outgrow every weed," Ackland said.


Hemp, he added, is the "fastest growing crop" he's ever seen. "On the average, hemp grows a foot a week."


The planting and harvesting window depends a lot on the climate in the growing region.


"I am planting on the 51st parallel, and the hemp crop grows better in the northern regions," he says.


That would make it perfect for North Dakota producers.


In his region, the planting window is between May 15 and June 15, Ackland said.


"Even though it is listed in terms of days to maturity, that isn't how it matures," he said. "It's a photosensitive plant, so if you seed it too early, you just end up with an awfully tall plant.


"These industrial hemp varieties don't grow as well in hot weather," he continued. "And too much daylight, such as you have in the southern parts of the U.S., can trigger the plant to go to seed." Then the seed can only be sold as bird food, he added.


In Saskatchewan, the hemp goes to seed around the end of September. Harvesting for seed occurs 4 to 6 weeks after the last pollen is shed from the plant, and fibre is harvested earlier.


"Our harvest period up here is different than yours in North Dakota. Some guys (in Canada) just got their sunflowers off," Ackland said, adding they've been known to still be harvesting some crops in December.


Harvesting the crop takes work, and hemp is hard on farm machinery, Ackland said.


"In most cases, hemp must be straight combined, and I really recommend an International combine," he said, adding that the hemp fibers tend to continually wrap around the external shafts of the combine, and need to be pulled off.


That is why modifications to the combine are recommended. The farm dealership in Craik, Harvest Services, has developed a different type of rotor for the combine that uses a 360 degree screw, and Ackland said it works well for harvesting hemp. "There are other rotors with 180 degree screws, but they don't work as well," he added.


When harvesting, Ackland said farmers are cutting the top 18 inches to 2 feet of the plant and leaving the rest behind.


"When you take the crop off, you have to take it off tough. It's not a crop you can go out and combine 150 acres a day, because you couldn't handle the seed coming off," he said. "You have to air it down, you have to dry it."


This year, he eventually harvested the whole crop, but it was a difficult time.


"The end of September, it got very wet, rained a lot. We had trouble getting all the crops off in Saskatchewan," he said.


At one point Brian was in one field operating the combine while Ackland followed in the next field with the truck. Ackland said it was beginning to rain, and he had to keep jumping in and out of the truck to run over to continually pull hemp fibers from the external shaft on the combine so the work could be finished and the crop taken off as quickly as possible.


"We only got half the crop off before the the weather turned bad," Ackland said.


He puts the crop in the bin at 16 to 22 percent moisture, and airs it down or uses a grain dryer quickly "before it goes rancid." Ackland said if the seed goes slightly rancid, the oil will have a more sour taste.


One reason hemp sells so well as oil in the marketplace is because of its "nutty" taste that many people prefer.


Ackland plans to continue growing hemp in spite of marketing difficulties and harvesting struggles.


"It's one of the most usable crops in the world," he said. "And right now, it's a profitable crop for me."

http://www.voiceyourself.com/article.php?section=4&more=1&id=3803

fj45lvr
01-04-2008, 08:31 AM
What % of people hear "legalize hemp" and believe that means legalize drugs (which RP is also for)? Probably quite a few.

Nearly ALL of the Republican base.

and technically Paul doesn't believe in the FEDERAL DRUG LAWS (unless they were passed by an amendment to the Constitution like prohibition was but I doubt he would vote for that ammendment)....that however does NOT mean that he is for DRUG USE (which I believe he would warn against for non-medicinal purposes and feels like alcohol abuse could become a sickness that warrants "treatment"). There is a big difference between what is "legal" and what is "beneficial" just as we know now that DOUBLE WHOPPERS w/ CHEESE are "legal". People are at LIBERTY to make their own "moral" determinations to ruin their own lives and bodies but it makes much more sense to get them treatment rather than slap them in a prison cell. (dealers may be a different story though without the "blackmarket" the profits might not be there to keep them in the "biz").

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:33 AM
February 1938: Mechanical Engineering Magazine
"THE MOST PROFITABLE & DESIRABLE CROP THAT CAN BE GROWN"

Modern technology was about to be applied to hemp production, making it the number one agricultural resource in America. Two of the most respected and influential journals in the nation, Popular Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, forecast a bright future for American hemp. Thousands of new products, creating millions of new jobs, would herald the end of the Great Depression. Instead, hemp was persecuted, outlawed and forgotten at the bidding of W.R. Hearst, who branded hemp the “Mexican killer weed, marihuana.”


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As early as 1901 and continuing to 1937, the U.S. Department of Agriculture repeatedly predicted that once machinery capable of harvesting, stripping and separating the fiber from the pulp was invented or engineered, hemp would again be America’s number one farm crop. The introduction of G.W. Schlichten’s decorticator in 1917 nearly fulfilled this prophesy.

The prediction was reaffirmed in the popular press when Popular Mechanics published its February, 1938 article “Billion-Dollar Crop.” Because of the printing schedule and deadline, Popular Mechanics prepared this article in Spring of 1937 when cannabis hemp for fiber, paper, dynamite and oil, was still legal to grow and was, in fact, an incredibly fast-growing industry.

Mechanical Engineering published an article about hemp that same month. It originated as a paper presented a year earlier at the February 26, 1937 Agricultural Processing Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Reports from the USDA during the 1930s, and Congressional testimony in 1937, showed that cultivated hemp acreage had been doubling in size in America almost every year from the time it hit its bottom acreage, 1930 - when 1,000 acres were planted in the U.S. - to 1937 - when 14,000 acres were cultivated - with plans to continue to double that acreage annually in the foreseeable future.

The newly mechanized cannabis hemp industry was in its infancy, but well on its way to making cannabis America’s largest agricultural crop. And, in light of subsequent developments (e.g., biomass energy technology, building materials, etc.), we now know that hemp is the world’s most important ecological resource and therefore, potentially our planet’s single largest industry.

The Popular Mechanics article was the very first time in American history that the term “billion-dollar” was ever applied to any U.S. agricultural crop!

Experts today conservatively estimate that, once fully restored in America, hemp industries will generate $500 billion to a trillion dollars per year, and will save the planet and civilization from fossilfuels and their derivatives - and from deforestation!

If Harry Anslinger, DuPont, Hearst and their paid for politicians had not outlawed hemp - under the pretext of marijuana - and suppressed hemp knowledge from our schools, researchers and even scientists; the glowing predictions in these articles would already have come true by now - and more benefits than anyone could then envision - as new technologies and uses continue to develop.

As one colleague so aptly put it: “Those articles were the last honest word spoken on hemp’s behalf for over 40 years...”

----------------------

The following is Mechanical Engineering’s February 26, 1937 article:
"THE MOST PROFITABLE AND
DESIRABLE CROP THAT CAN BE GROWN"
FLAX AND HEMP: FROM THE SEED TO THE LOOM
By George A. Lowe

This country imports practically all of its fibers except cotton. The Whitney gin, combined with improved spinning methods, enables this country to produce cotton goods so far below the cost of linen that linen manufacture practically ceased in the United States. We cannot produce our fibers at less cost than can other farmers of the world. Aside from the higher cost of labor, we do not get as large production. For instance, Yugoslavia, which has the greatest fiber production per acre in Europe, recently had a yield of 883 lbs. Comparable figures for other countries are Argentina, 749 lbs.; Egypt 616 lbs.; and India, 393 lbs.; while the average yield in this country is 383 lbs.

To meet world competition profitably, we must improve our methods all the way from the field to the loom.

Flax is still pulled up by the roots, retted in a pond, dried in the sun, broken until the fibers separate from the wood, then spun, and finally bleached with lye from wood ashes, potash from burned seaweed, or lime. Improvements in tilling, planting, and harvesting mechanisms have materially helped the large farmers and, to a certain degree, the smaller ones, but the processes from the crop to the yarn are crude, wasteful and land injurious. Hemp, the strongest of the vegetable fibers, gives the greatest production per acre and requires the least attention. It not only requires no weeding, but also kills off all the weeds and leaves the soil in splendid condition for the following crop. This, irrespective of its own monetary value, makes it a desirable crop to grow.

In climate and cultivation, its requisites are similar to flax and, like flax, should be harvested before it is too ripe. The best time is when the lower leaves on the stalk wither and the flowers shed their pollen.

Like flax, the fibers run out where leaf stems are on the stalks and are made up of laminated fibers that are held together by pectose gums. When chemically treated like flax, hemp yields a beautiful fiber so closely resembling flax that a high-power microscope is needed to tell the difference - and only then because in hemp, some of the ends are split. Wetting a few strands of fiber and holding them suspended will definitely identify the two because, upon drying, flax will be found to turn to the right or clockwise, and hemp to the left or counterclockwise.

Before [World War I], Russia produced 400,000 tons of hemp, all of which is still hand-broken and hand-scutched. They now produce half that quantity and use most of it themselves, as also does Italy from whom we had large importations.

In this country, hemp, when planted one bu. per acre, yields about three tons of dry straw per acre. From 15 to 20 percent of this is fiber, and 80 to 85 percent is woody material. The rapidly growing market for cellulose and wood flour for plastics gives good reason to believe that this hitherto wasted material may prove sufficiently profitable to pay for the crop, leaving the cost of the fiber sufficiently low to compete with 500,000 tons of hard fiber now imported annually.

Hemp being from two to three times as strong as any of the hard fibers, much less weight is required to give the same yardage. For instance, sisal binder twine of 40-lb. tensile strength runs 450 ft. to the lb. A better twine made of hemp would run 1280 ft. to the lb. Hemp is not subject to as many kinds of deterioration as are the tropical fibers, and none of them lasts as long in either fresh or salt water.

While theory in the past has been that straw should be cut when the pollen starts to fly, some of the best fiber handled by Minnesota hemp people was heavy with seed. This point should be proved as soon as possible by planting a few acres and then harvesting the first quarter when the pollen is flying, the second and third a week or 10 days apart, and the last when the seed is fully matured. These four lots should be kept separate and scutched and processed separately to detect any difference in the quality and quantity of the fiber and seed.

Several types of machine are available in this country for harvesting hemp. One of these was brought out several years ago by the International Harvester Company. Recently, growers of hemp in the Middle West have rebuilt regular grain binders for this work. This rebuilding is not particularly expensive and the machines are reported to give satisfactory service.

Degumming of hemp is analogous to the treatment given flax. The shards probably offer slightly more resistance to digestion. On the other hand, they break down readily upon completion of the digestion process. And excellent fiber can, therefore, be obtained from hemp also. Hemp, when treated by a known chemical process, can be spun on cotton, wool, and worsted machinery, and has as much absorbance and wearing quality as linen.

Several types of machines for scutching the hemp stalks are also on the market. Scutch mills formerly operating in Illinois and Washington used the system that consisted of a set of eight pairs of fluted rollers, through which the dried straw was passed to break up the woody portion. From there, the fiber with adhering shards - or hurds, as they are called - was transferred by an operator to an endless-chain conveyor. This carries the fiber past two revolving single drums in tandem, all having beating blades on their periphery, which beat off most of the hurds as well as the fibers that do not run the full length of the stalks. The proportion of line fiber to tow is 50% each. Tow or short tangled fiber then goes to a vibrating cleaner that shakes out some of the hurds. In Minnesota and Illinois, another type has been tried out. This machine consists of a feeding table upon which the stalks are placed horizontally. Conveyor chains carry the stalks along until they are grasped by a clamping chain that grips them and carries them through half of the machine.

A pair of intermeshing lawnmower-type beaters are placed at a 45-degree angle to the feeding chain and break the hemp stalks over the sharp edge of a steel plate, the object being to break the woody portion of the straw and whip the hurds from the fiber. On the other side and slightly beyond the first set of lawnmower beaters is another set, which is placed 90-degrees from the first pair and whips out the hurds.

The first clamping chain transfers the stalks to another to scutch the fiber that was under the clamp at the beginning. Unfortunately, this type of scutching makes even more tow than the so-called Wisconsin type. This tow is difficult to reclean because the hurds are broken into long slivers that tenaciously adhere to the fiber.

Another type passes the stalks through a series of graduated fluted rollers. This breaks up the woody portion into hurds about 3/4 inch long, and the fiber then passes on through a series of reciprocating slotted plates working between stationary slotted plates.

Adhering hurds are removed from the fiber which continues on a conveyor to the baling press. Because no beating of the fiber against the grain occurs, this type of scutching makes only line fiber. This is then processed by the same methods as those for flax.

Paint and lacquer manufacturers are interested in hempseed oil which is a good drying agent. When markets have been developed for the products now being wasted, seed and hurds, hemp will prove, both for the farmer and the public, the most profitable and desirable crop that can be grown, and one that can made American mills independent of importations.

Recent floods and dust storms have given warnings against the destruction of timber. Possibly, the hitherto waste products of flax and hemp may yet meet a good part of that need, especially in the plastics field which is growing by leaps and bounds.

http://digitalhemp.com/eecdrom/TEXT/page1.htm

SilentBull
01-04-2008, 08:35 AM
This is a great point! Can someone please contact the campaign?? Why haven't they thought of this?

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:37 AM
This is a great point! Can someone please contact the campaign?? Why haven't they thought of this?

Ron Paul has, he is the sponser of the Bill thats sitting on the House floor to legalize the industrized farming of hemp.

http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/Hemp_Farming_Act_2007.pdf

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 08:39 AM
Nearly ALL of the Republican base.

and technically Paul doesn't believe in the FEDERAL DRUG LAWS (unless they were passed by an amendment to the Constitution like prohibition was but I doubt he would vote for that ammendment)....that however does NOT mean that he is for DRUG USE (which I believe he would warn against for non-medicinal purposes and feels like alcohol abuse could become a sickness that warrants "treatment"). There is a big difference between what is "legal" and what is "beneficial" just as we know now that DOUBLE WHOPPERS w/ CHEESE are "legal". People are at LIBERTY to make their own "moral" determinations to ruin their own lives and bodies but it makes much more sense to get them treatment rather than slap them in a prison cell. (dealers may be a different story though without the "blackmarket" the profits might not be there to keep them in the "biz").


Like I said before, legallizing industrial hemp farming is also going to battle the growing of marijuana for drug use because the pollen from hemp will ruin outdoor marijuana crops. After it is pollinated by hemp the marijuana crop would become useless as it causes the marijuana plant to stop resin production and all the pot growers will end up with is seeds and no product to sell.

I see so many positives with legalizing farming of industrialized hemp that you would have to be crazy to not allow it. Which tells me, our government went crazy half a century ago.

DaneKirk
01-04-2008, 08:44 AM
IMO the biggest silent issue that could have hands-down won us Iowa is the legalization of industrial hemp. As far as I know none of the other GOP candidates care about Hemp but RP introduced a bill to legalize (http://www.votehemp.com/PR/02-13-07_federal_bill.html).

this is HUGE- if you know anything about hemp then you know that it is an ABSOLUTE BOOM for any and all American farmers and for all domestic manufacturing. This is practically a miracle plant that needs almost no fertilizer, no pesticides/herbicides, increases the yields of other plants when used in crop rotation, replenishes the soil of resources and can quite literally be used to make 80% of all products in the market- You can bet that American farmers will vote hemp and will vote Ron Paul. I think we could have won Iowa if we'd sold the hemp issue as being third most important after Foreign Policy and Fiscal Conservatism.

But we still have a chance. The entire breadbasket might be up for grabs and you know that if we sell our position on hemp, there will be an increase of Paul support. CA, the two Dakotas, Virginia and Kentucky have been trying to legalize hemp for AGES now (I'm sure that there's a bunch of other states i'm missing as well) but the DEA and the republican establishment have been stepping all over them. We need to sell our position on this issue to win votes.

Is this a joke? Talk like this is going to ensure Ron never gets elected. You go right ahead with this and I will be laughing my ass off.

Oliver
01-04-2008, 08:45 AM
It isn't? How much are you paying for gas while the world is saying oil supply is running thin.

Energy isn't an issue when the Northeast is struggling to pay to heat their homes and people can't afford to pump gas into their transportation?

We don't have an environmental issue with carbon gases being emmited into the atmosphere? Deisel fuel made with hemp emits only 1/3 of the pollutants as that of petroleum deisel.

Hemp could save the farmers from having to sell their land to developement or from losing their farms to government forclosure, save our dependancy on foreign petroleum, save people from high heat and travel expenses, and save the environment ALL IN ONE SHOT!

Farmers could make their own deisel fuel to run their machinery if they were allowed to grow hemp. It isn't a difficult process.

Ron's stance is that Ethanol isn't lucrative and doesn't deserve
to be subsidized right now - the free markets should find the
solution since theiy're much more flexible concerning those issues.
Why do you disagree? - There is no question about the facts that
dependence on foreign oil is bad and that we need a solution...

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 09:42 AM
Ron's stance is that Ethanol isn't lucrative and doesn't deserve
to be subsidized right now - the free markets should find the
solution since theiy're much more flexible concerning those issues.
Why do you disagree? - There is no question about the facts that
dependence on foreign oil is bad and that we need a solution...

Cough cough....

Ron doesn't believe any farms should be subsidized. That is not the issue.

The only reason ethanol isn't lucrative is because there is no real demand for ethanol.

We have states, farmers, businesses, and investors who have spent millions in the last decade trying to push ethanol into the market, the problem is, there aren't a whole lot of products made which can run on ethanol alone.

Also, due to the low demand for ethanol, it isn't as widely available as gasoline. Even in the major cities you would be lucky to find more than 3-4 sources to fill your automobile with ethanol if it happened to be equiped to run on it.

It has to be a consistant effort on the parts of the buyers and manufacturers. If people would quit buying gasoline engine cars and things that depended on petroleum to operate and buy things that ran on alternative fuels, we would see more products that offered alternative fuels and their costs would go down. While at the same time it would drive demand of that alternative fuel source up which would raise its value where it would become lucrative.

Right now people are losing out the rear who have invested in ethanol, but its no ones faults but our own.

We claim to know the problems, we claim to know the answers, yet people don't take action.

Petroleum is an addiction, and as we consume it, it is consuming us.

Eric21ND
01-04-2008, 10:05 AM
You raise a good point. Paul is great at general sort of speech, but he needs to be more specific on issues concerning the state that he's in.

Oliver
01-04-2008, 10:18 AM
Cough cough....

Ron doesn't believe any farms should be subsidized. That is not the issue.

The only reason ethanol isn't lucrative is because there is no real demand for ethanol.

We have states, farmers, businesses, and investors who have spent millions in the last decade trying to push ethanol into the market, the problem is, there aren't a whole lot of products made which can run on ethanol alone.

Also, due to the low demand for ethanol, it isn't as widely available as gasoline. Even in the major cities you would be lucky to find more than 3-4 sources to fill your automobile with ethanol if it happened to be equiped to run on it.

It has to be a consistant effort on the parts of the buyers and manufacturers. If people would quit buying gasoline engine cars and things that depended on petroleum to operate and buy things that ran on alternative fuels, we would see more products that offered alternative fuels and their costs would go down. While at the same time it would drive demand of that alternative fuel source up which would raise its value where it would become lucrative.

Right now people are losing out the rear who have invested in ethanol, but its no ones faults but our own.

We claim to know the problems, we claim to know the answers, yet people don't take action.

Petroleum is an addiction, and as we consume it, it is consuming us.

Well - if Ron's stance is that the states should decide, why should
it be his issue at all? It's the states decision, not Ron's political
platform.

So why should he point it out explicitly in the first place if it's not HIS issue???? :confused:

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 10:22 AM
Well - if Ron's stance is that the states should decide, why should
it be his issue at all? It's the states decision, not Ron's political
platform.

So why should he point it out explicitly in the first place if it's not HIS issue???? :confused:

Are you serious?

It IS his issue, Ron Paul is the one who wrote the Legalization of Industrialized Hemp Bill ;)

The problem is, growing hemp is against federal law, not state law. States like North Dakota allow industrial hemp farming, but the federal law doesn't.

So farmers in North Dakota plant crops and the Federal DEA comes in and arrests them even though the state says they are allowed to do it.

That is the problem and why federal laws against growing hemp need repealed.

Wake up....

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 10:24 AM
US Rep. Ron Paul, the libertarian-leaning congressman from East Texas, last week introduced the Industrial Hemp Farming Act (HR 3037), which would remove federal restrictions on the cultivation of industrial hemp, the low-THC, high-fiber cannabis cultivar popular in products from candy bars to auto body parts to sneakers. The introduction of Rep. Paul's bill marks the first time a hemp bill has been introduced at the federal level since the federal government outlawed hemp farming in the 1930s. (That ban was temporarily lifted during World War II as part of the "Hemp for Victory" program.)

Currently, some 30 other countries, including neighboring Canada, allow for hemp cultivation for industrial and nutritional purposes. Six US states have already voted to remove barriers to research on hemp production, while legislation is pending in 20 more. Support for industrial hemp also comes from the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture, which "supports revisions to the federal rules and regulations authorizing commercial production of industrial hemp." And a leading farm organization, the National Grange, also "supports research, production, processing and marketing of industrial hemp as a viable agricultural activity."

But none of that can happen without a change in the federal law. Rep. Paul and hemp advocates tried to jumpstart that process last week at a Capitol Hill luncheon where about a hundred congressional staffers feasted on a five-course gourmet hemp meal featuring delicacies like Bahama Hempnut Crusted Wild Salmon and Fuji Fennel Hempseed Salad. Attendees were served up not only delicious food but also a healthy portion of rhetoric designed to call attention to the need for a new hemp law.

"It is unfortunate that the federal government has stood in the way of American farmers, including many who are struggling to make ends meet, competing in the global industrial hemp market," said Rep. Paul. "Indeed the founders of our nation, some of who grew hemp, surely would find that federal restrictions on farmers growing a safe and profitable crop on their own land are inconsistent with the constitutional guarantee of a limited, restrained federal government. Therefore, I urge my colleagues to stand up for American farmers and cosponsor the Industrial Hemp Farming Act."

Among the guests at the luncheon were four original cosponsors, Reps. Sam Farr (D-CA), Pete Stark (D-CA), Jim McDermott (D-WA), George Miller (D-CA) and Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ). Also in attendance was consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader, who called the US ban on hemp farming "bureaucratic medievalism."

North Dakota is one of the six states that have passed legislation okaying research into hemp. North Dakota state Rep. David Monson (R-Osnabrock), the sponsor of the hemp bill there, told the luncheon the federal government was an obstacle. "Industrial hemp production is on hold in North Dakota and the entire US, due to roadblocks in Washington DC," Monson said. "We have had tremendous bipartisan support for legislation we've introduced in North Dakota."

With companies ranging from Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps to Adidas to Nutiva Hemp Foods and many more all using hemp in their products, US farmers are poised to start profiting from hemp crops as soon as they are able. "Industrial hemp has become a lucrative crop for farmers in Europe, Canada and Asia, so farmers here are asking 'Why are we being left out?'" said Alexis Baden-Mayer, Director of Government Relations for the industry group Vote Hemp. "Because there are millions of cars on the road with hemp door panels, tens of millions of dollars spent annually on hemp food and hemp body care and hemp paper is being made in the US, people are asking tough questions about why the US government won't distinguish low-THC hemp from high-THC drug varieties. I believe this federal legislation will gain momentum over the next year as we spend time educating Congress and their constituents about the need for reforms," said Baden-Mayer.

North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson undoubtedly spoke for many farmers who see dollar signs around hemp. "Industrial hemp is used in a tremendous variety of products, including food products, soap, cosmetics, fertilizer, textiles, paper, paints and plastics," Johnson said. "Once the crop is legalized in this country, I believe science will find even more uses for industrial hemp, uses that will make industrial hemp a popular and profitable crop."

http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle-old/393/hempbill.shtml

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 10:29 AM
Video on Ron Paul & Hemp for American Farmers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDLiHJFPWsM

Oliver
01-04-2008, 10:39 AM
Are you serious?

It IS his issue, Ron Paul is the one who wrote the Legalization of Industrialized Hemp Bill ;)

The problem is, growing hemp is against federal law, not state law. States like North Dakota allow industrial hemp farming, but the federal law doesn't.

So farmers in North Dakota plant crops and the Federal DEA comes in and arrests them even though the state says they are allowed to do it.

That is the problem and why federal laws against growing hemp need repealed.

Wake up....

I am serious since I didn't read that bill. So I'm right and the bill
proposes that it's a state issue?

But in any way - why should it be a major issue when people will
attack him about it? Doesn't make any strategical sense to me to
win this race. Does it for you??? :confused:

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 10:42 AM
I am serious since I didn't read that bill. So I'm right and the bill
proposes that it's a state issue?

But in any way - why should it be a major issue when people will
attack him about it? Doesn't make any strategical sense to me to
win this race. Does it for you??? :confused:

Oh boy. You know its alot easier to drive asleep at the wheel if you stick your chin on the steering wheel, that way when you fall asleep you don't crash from your head falling to one side or the other.

Seriously though, the reason there needs to be a Bill to repeal the federal ban on hemp farming is because it is ALREADY A FEDERAL ISSUE which needs transfered back to the states, and has been since the 1930's, which is UNCONSTITUTIONAL.

If it wasn't important to Ron Paul he wouldn't have written a Bill to repeal the ban on it now would he?

Boy you're a hard nut to crack.

The fact is, right now farmers aren't going to support Ron Paul unless he gives them a reason to want to support him. Right now they are being paid to not grow anything by the Democrats.

Don't you think farmers would vote for the guy who gives them an option to profit off of their land instead of being paid to not use the land at all which in return causes them to not be able to afford to keep their land.

GodOfThunder
01-04-2008, 10:46 AM
NO WAY!

Did you not see the people voting at the caucuses last night? They're a bunch of old people and just the mention of the word "marijuana" or "hemp" would have them running for a different candidate.

If Ron Paul even uses the word "legalize", he's hurting his chances.

Remember, the majority of Americans are dumb. They don't care what the point is, all they know is "Drugs=Bad".

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 10:59 AM
NO WAY!

Did you not see the people voting at the caucuses last night? They're a bunch of old people and just the mention of the word "marijuana" or "hemp" would have them running for a different candidate.

If Ron Paul even uses the word "legalize", he's hurting his chances.

Remember, the majority of Americans are dumb. They don't care what the point is, all they know is "Drugs=Bad".

Are you kidding me? The same farmers who are going broke and losing their land? The same state whos neighboring states are legalizing insdustrial hemp farming? If anything, they are jealous of their evangelical neighbors who are growing hemp.

Here is a bill that is sitting on Iowas commitee floor which is similiar to what some of their neighboring states have already passed.

----------------------------

Senate File 191
Partial Bill History
Bill Introduced: S.J. 303
Committee Report Issued: S.J. 380
Complete Bill History
Bill Text
PAG LIN
1 1 Section 1. FINDINGS. The general assembly finds that a
1 2 trend exists among states to consider the economic importance
1 3 of industrial hemp, which is a major crop in other nations.
1 4 Industrial hemp historically has contributed to the economic
1 5 welfare of this country, and is a renewable natural resource
1 6 manufactured for textiles, pulp, paper, oil, building
1 7 materials, and other products. The purpose of this Act is to
1 8 promote the economy of this state by providing for research
1 9 necessary to develop industrial hemp as a viable crop.
1 10 Sec. 2. NEW SECTION. 159.41 INDUSTRIAL HEMP LICENSING
1 11 AND REGULATION.
1 12 1. As used in this section, "industrial hemp" means
1 13 cannabis sativa L. which has a percentage of
1 14 tetrahydrocannabinol of not more than one percent, as provided
1 15 by rules which shall be adopted by the department.
1 16 2. The department of agriculture and land stewardship, in
1 17 cooperation with the department of public safety, shall
1 18 administer this section. The department of agriculture and
1 19 land stewardship shall cooperate with other law enforcement
1 20 agencies. The department shall also collaborate with agencies
1 21 of the United States government, including but not limited to
1 22 the drug enforcement administration of the United States
1 23 department of justice, in order to provide for the production
1 24 and possession of industrial hemp according to the terms and
1 25 conditions required by the United States government. The
1 26 department may execute any memorandum of understanding with a
1 27 United States government agency in order to administer this
1 28 section.
1 29 3. To the extent permitted by the United States
1 30 government, the department shall issue licenses to persons for
1 31 the production and possession of industrial hemp,
1 32 notwithstanding any section of this chapter to the contrary.
1 33 A person must possess a license pursuant to this section to
1 34 produce or possess industrial hemp. The department of
1 35 agriculture and land stewardship shall limit the number of
2 1 licenses that it grants each year in order to ensure that the
2 2 department of agriculture and land stewardship, in cooperation
2 3 with the department of public safety, may strictly enforce
2 4 compliance with the requirements of this section and section
2 5 266.39G. A license shall expire not later than one year
2 6 following the date of issuance.
2 7 a. A person applying for a license shall file an
2 8 application on a form prescribed by the department of
2 9 agriculture and land stewardship according to procedures
2 10 required by the department. The department may charge an
2 11 application fee which shall not exceed five hundred dollars.
2 12 An applicant and each employee of the applicant must satisfy
2 13 eligibility requirements of the department, which shall
2 14 include but shall not be limited to all of the following:
2 15 (1) Be eighteen years of age or older.
2 16 (2) Never have been convicted of a felony, an aggravated
2 17 misdemeanor, or of any other offense related to the possession
2 18 of a controlled substance.
2 19 (3) Not be addicted to the use of alcohol or a controlled
2 20 substance.
2 21 (4) Be of good moral character and not have been judged
2 22 guilty of a crime involving moral turpitude.
2 23 b. The department shall give priority to approving an
2 24 application, if the person has entered into an agreement with
2 25 Iowa state university in conducting research as provided in
2 26 section 266.39G.
2 27 c. The licensee shall maintain accurate records, as
2 28 required by the department, which shall contain information
2 29 relating to the licensee's operation, including but not
2 30 limited to the production site, the time and manner of
2 31 harvest, and persons involved in the production, harvesting,
2 32 and distribution of the industrial hemp.
2 33 4. Notwithstanding chapter 124, the licensee may produce,
2 34 harvest, and distribute industrial hemp. However, the
2 35 licensee must act in strict conformance with this section.
3 1 The licensee shall raise industrial hemp upon demonstration
3 2 plots as approved by the department. The demonstration plots
3 3 must be used to develop optimal agricultural practices for
3 4 raising industrial hemp. All plant materials from industrial
3 5 hemp grown on demonstration plots, except plant materials
3 6 retained for breeding and propagation, must be used for
3 7 commercial uses approved by the department.
3 8 5. The department of agriculture and land stewardship or
3 9 the department of public safety may inspect a production or
3 10 distribution site of a licensee at any time, and may inspect
3 11 records required to be maintained as provided in this section.
3 12 The department of agriculture and land stewardship shall
3 13 assess and the licensee shall pay the actual costs of the
3 14 inspection. If the owner or occupant of any property used by
3 15 the licensee for the production or distribution refuses
3 16 admittance onto the property, or if prior to such refusal the
3 17 department of agriculture and land stewardship or department
3 18 of public safety demonstrates the necessity for a warrant, the
3 19 department of agriculture and land stewardship may make
3 20 application under oath or affirmation to the district court of
3 21 the county in which the property is located for the issuance
3 22 of a search warrant. If the court is satisfied from
3 23 examination of the applicant, of other witnesses, if any, and
3 24 of the allegations of the application of the existence of the
3 25 grounds of the application, or that probable cause exists to
3 26 believe such grounds exist, the court may issue a search
3 27 warrant.
3 28 6. The department may suspend or revoke a license if the
3 29 licensee or an employee of the licensee is determined to have
3 30 committed any of the following:
3 31 a. Fraud in applying for or obtaining a license.
3 32 b. A violation of this section or rules adopted by the
3 33 department pursuant to this section, including failing to
3 34 comply with a requirement of this section.
3 35 c. An offense involving moral turpitude, a felony, an
4 1 aggravated misdemeanor, or any other offense related to the
4 2 possession of a controlled substance.
4 3 7. a. Except as provided in paragraph "b", an applicant
4 4 for a license or a licensee who knowingly violates a
4 5 requirement of this section or a rule adopted by the
4 6 department pursuant to this section is subject to a civil
4 7 penalty of not more than fifty thousand dollars.
4 8 b. A person who makes a false statement on the application
4 9 for a license regarding the conviction of a felony, aggravated
4 10 misdemeanor, or any other offense related to the possession of
4 11 a controlled substance is guilty of an aggravated misdemeanor.
4 12 Sec. 3. NEW SECTION. 266.39G INDUSTRIAL HEMP – RESEARCH
4 13 BY IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY.
4 14 1. As used in this section, "industrial hemp" means
4 15 cannabis sativa L. which has a percentage of
4 16 tetrahydrocannabinol of not more than one percent.
4 17 2. In administering this section, Iowa state university
4 18 shall do all of the following:
4 19 a. Collaborate with agencies of the United States
4 20 government, including the drug enforcement administration of
4 21 the United States department of justice, in order to produce
4 22 and possess industrial hemp according to the terms and
4 23 conditions required by the United States government. Iowa
4 24 state university may execute any memorandum of understanding
4 25 with a United States government agency in order to administer
4 26 this section, and may obtain any federal permit or other
4 27 authorization required to administer this section.
4 28 b. Cooperate with the department of agriculture and land
4 29 stewardship in carrying out this section and section 159.41.
4 30 The university shall cooperate with persons licensed by the
4 31 department to produce industrial hemp as provided in that
4 32 section. The university shall also cooperate with law
4 33 enforcement agencies, including the department of public
4 34 safety.
4 35 3. Notwithstanding chapter 124, Iowa state university
5 1 shall, to the extent permitted by the United States
5 2 government, conduct research regarding the production and
5 3 marketing of industrial hemp. The research shall include an
5 4 analysis of all of the following:
5 5 a. The production of high-quality seed varieties having
5 6 proven adaptation and performance.
5 7 b. The feasibility of producing industrial hemp in this
5 8 state as a profitable cash crop, including the adaptability of
5 9 plant varieties to soils and growing conditions in this state.
5 10 c. The production of industrial hemp having the lowest
5 11 possible percentage of tetrahydrocannabinol.
5 12 d. The development of production practices, including best
5 13 management practices for applying nutrients and pesticides;
5 14 strategies to best conserve, maintain, and improve soil
5 15 productivity; and methods to control disease.
5 16 e. The need for and availability of equipment and
5 17 machinery required to efficiently and cost-effectively produce
5 18 and harvest industrial hemp.
5 19 f. Market conditions affecting the economic viability of
5 20 industrial hemp production, including the identification of
5 21 markets, the utilization of products, processing methods, and
5 22 other economic factors affecting the profitable marketing of
5 23 industrial hemp.
5 24 4. The research shall be conducted as provided by Iowa
5 25 state university, and may be carried out in part by the Iowa
5 26 agricultural and home economics experiment station, including
5 27 the Leopold center for sustainable agriculture. Research
5 28 shall, to every extent possible, be determined by experimental
5 29 trials when appropriate. The university shall cooperate with
5 30 other states engaged in conducting similar research. The
5 31 university shall seek financial support from public and
5 32 private sources in order to administer this section, including
5 33 associations representing agricultural producers. The
5 34 university shall report the findings and recommendations of
5 35 the study to the general assembly not later than January 15,
6 1 2006.
6 2 Sec. 4. Section 317.1A, Code 2003, is amended by adding
6 3 the following new unnumbered paragraph:
6 4 NEW UNNUMBERED PARAGRAPH. "Industrial hemp" which is
6 5 produced as provided in section 159.41 or 266.39G is not a
6 6 noxious weed.
6 7 EXPLANATION
6 8 This bill provides for the production of industrial hemp
6 9 which has a percentage of tetrahydrocannabinol of not more
6 10 than 1 percent.
6 11 The bill requires the department of agriculture and land
6 12 stewardship, in cooperation with the department of public
6 13 safety, to administer a program to license persons involved in
6 14 industrial hemp production. The bill requires the department
6 15 to collaborate with agencies of the United States government,
6 16 including but not limited to the drug enforcement
6 17 administration in order to provide for the production and
6 18 possession of industrial hemp according to the terms and
6 19 conditions required by the United States government. The bill
6 20 provides that to the extent permitted by the United States
6 21 government, the department shall issue licenses to persons for
6 22 the production and possession of industrial hemp,
6 23 notwithstanding any other provision of Code chapter 124
6 24 regulating controlled substances. The bill provides
6 25 requirements for applicants and persons involved in the
6 26 production or possession of industrial hemp. The bill
6 27 provides for the inspection of the premises and records of
6 28 licensees. The bill provides for the suspension or revocation
6 29 of a license.
6 30 The bill provides for research by Iowa state university
6 31 regarding the production and marketing of industrial hemp
6 32 which has a percentage of tetrahydrocannabinol of not more
6 33 than 1 percent. The bill provides an exception to the
6 34 restriction of Iowa's controlled substance Act and authorizes
6 35 the university to collaborate with agencies of the United
7 1 States government in order to produce and possess industrial
7 2 hemp according to the terms and conditions required by the
7 3 United States government. The bill requires the university to
7 4 cooperate with law enforcement agencies and the department of
7 5 agriculture and land stewardship in carrying out the bill's
7 6 provisions. The bill authorizes the university to conduct
7 7 research regarding the production of high-quality seed
7 8 varieties, the feasibility of producing industrial hemp in
7 9 this state as a profitable cash crop, the production of
7 10 industrial hemp having the lowest possible percentage of
7 11 tetrahydrocannabinol, the development of production practices,
7 12 the need for and availability of suitable equipment and
7 13 machinery, and market conditions affecting the economic
7 14 viability of industrial hemp production. The bill requires
7 15 the university to cooperate with other states engaged in
7 16 conducting similar research, and to seek financial support
7 17 from public and private sources. The bill requires the
7 18 university to report its findings and recommendations to the
7 19 general assembly not later than January 15, 2006.
7 20 The bill provides that licensees who violate the provisions
7 21 of the bill are subject to a civil penalty of up to $50,000.
7 22 The bill provides that a person who makes a false statement on
7 23 the application for a license regarding a conviction of a
7 24 felony, aggravated misdemeanor, or any other offense related
7 25 to the possession of a controlled substance is guilty of an
7 26 aggravated misdemeanor.
7 27 LSB 2564XS 80
7 28 da/cl/14

http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/SF_191_2003.pdf

Oliver
01-04-2008, 11:02 AM
Oh boy. You know its alot easier to drive asleep at the wheel if you stick your chin on the steering wheel, that way when you fall asleep you don't crash from your head falling to one side or the other.

Seriously though, the reason there needs to be a Bill to repeal the federal ban on hemp farming is because it is ALREADY A FEDERAL ISSUE which needs transfered back to the states, and has been since the 1930's, which is UNCONSTITUTIONAL.

If it wasn't important to Ron Paul he wouldn't have written a Bill to repeal the ban on it now would he?

Boy you're a hard nut to crack.

The fact is, right now farmers aren't going to support Ron Paul unless he gives them a reason to want to support him. Right now they are being paid to not grow anything by the Democrats.

Don't you think farmers would vote for the guy who gives them an option to profit off of their land instead of being paid to not use the land at all which in return causes them to not be able to afford to keep their land.

You didn't grasped the point here: Where the fuck is this an issue
in the current race? No one cares about it despite the Marijuana smokers.

Your point? - It's an national issue because YOU said so??? :confused::confused::confused:
If so - stop smoking.

GodOfThunder
01-04-2008, 11:03 AM
Dude, it doesn't matter. The farmers don't matter.

The minute the word "hemp" comes from Ron Paul's mouth is the same minute Fox News plasters "RON PAUL WANTS TO LEGALIZE POT AND HAVE A NATION FULL OF POT SMOKERS" all over their screen and the vast majority of Americans think he's nuts and won't ever vote for him.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:05 AM
Marijuana smokers? Hemp has nothing to do with Marijuana... Again, asleep at the wheel.

In fact, if hemp were farmed, marijuana wouldn't be able to be harvested anywhere near it. Hemp pollen ruins marijuana crops.

So all those anti-drug people should be happy about hemp farming since those who grow marijuana would have their crops ruined.

Oliver
01-04-2008, 11:05 AM
Dude, it doesn't matter. The farmers don't matter.

The minute the word "hemp" comes from Ron Paul's mouth is the same minute Fox News plasters "RON PAUL WANTS TO LEGALIZE POT AND HAVE A NATION FULL OF POT SMOKERS" all over their screen and the vast majority of Americans think he's nuts and won't ever vote for him.

http://250kb.de/u/080104/p/a07c46b9.png

:D

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:07 AM
You didn't grasped the point here: Where the fuck is this an issue
in the current race? No one cares about it despite the Marijuana smokers.

Your point? - It's an national issue because YOU said so??? :confused::confused::confused:
If so - stop smoking.

-10

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:10 AM
It's a point because its one of Ron Pauls issues.

How can he propose a Bill and then not even talk anything about it? Make sense?

It obviously is something that is important to Ron Paul, I have heard him speak on legalizing industrial hemp, I've also heard him speak on legalizing marijuana, and you know what, he still has support.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:11 AM
I'm willing to bet Ron would have done alot better in Iowa if he would have pushed his hemp farming issue.

---------------------

Ron Paul's Sleeper Issue: Industrial Hemp
Posted July 21st, 2007 by antiwar in Ron Paul
Most readers know that Ron Paul is in the front lines of the fight against the drug war.

But a lesser-known aspect of that issue may garner support from an important segment: farmers.

Last month, The Economist focused on the fight by Iowa farmers to get the right to grow the cannabis plant to produce industrial hemp, which can provide cheaper alternatives for paper, plastics, and one of the healthiest food oils available. On the political side, the article explains "Ron Paul, a Texas congressman and presidential candidate, could win over farmers in Iowa because of his pro-hemp lobbying. In February he introduced a bill in Congress that would allow Americans to grow it."

Today's New York Times has an article about North Dakota farmers wanting to get in on the hemp boom:

Though federal authorities ban the growing of hemp, saying it contains tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive substance better known as THC in marijuana, six states this year considered legislation to allow farmers to grow industrial hemp, and Representative Ron Paul, Republican of Texas, introduced a bill in Washington that would let states allow such crops.

http://www.dailypaul.com/node/830

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:15 AM
Hemp On a high
Jun 21st 2007 | SEATTLE
From The Economist print edition

Is weed the new green?

Sprouting soon in North Dakota“PLANS are afoot for a great expansion of the hemp industry.” So proclaimed the Department of Agriculture in its rousing 1942 movie, “Hemp for Victory”, which urged farmers to rally to the cause: “Hemp for mooring ships! Hemp for tow lines! Hemp for tackle and gear!” The plant's long, strong fibres twist easily into rope, which made it useful for parachute webbing. The war effort was imperilled when Japan's seizure of the Philippines curtailed America's supply.

But despite the enthusiasm of wartime planners, hemp never took root (as it were). Taxes and regulations, introduced in 1937 but minimally enforced during the war, kicked in again during the 1950s. Hemp is a variety of the cannabis plant, which also produces marijuana—though industrial hemp has a much smaller concentration of the mind-blowing compound, THC, than the smokable stuff. America's puritans, not to mention nylon-makers, wanted production shut down.

Nowadays farmers are banned from growing hemp without a permit from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which usually refuses to grant one. So many hemp products in America—food, lotions, clothing, paper and so forth—are imported from China or Canada, where farmers have been allowed to grow hemp commercially since 1998.


Could hemp make a comeback? America's greens have fallen for the stuff, and not just because plenty like the occasional puff. Hemp grows so easily that few pesticides or even fertilisers are needed. “Feral” hemp is said to grow by the roadside in Iowa and Nebraska. Barbara Filippone, owner of a hemp fabric company called Enviro Textiles, says demand has rocketed—sales are growing by 35% a year. Nutiva, a California-based hemp company that sells hemp bars, shakes and oils, saw sales rise from under $1m three years ago to $4.5m last year. “Hemp is the next soy,” predicts John Roulac, Nutiva's founder.

American farmers would love to grow hemp. North Dakota, which in 1999 became the first state to allow industrial hemp farming, has taken the lead. This week two farmers from the state filed a lawsuit to force the DEA to issue permits to grow hemp; the farmers had applied for permits back in February, thus far to no avail. Ron Paul, a Texas congressman and presidential candidate, could win over farmers in Iowa because of his pro-hemp lobbying. In February he introduced a bill in Congress that would allow Americans to grow it.

If hemp grows so easily, what about using the crop as a biofuel? A Mercedes-Benz “hemp car” did make its way across America six years ago. (Among other uses in cars, “Pimp My Ride”, an MTV show, recently featured a 1965 Chevy Impala that runs on biodiesel and has hemp upholstery.) Perhaps this is just the niche for Willie Nelson. He already has his own biodiesel line, called BioWillie, and is not unfamiliar with other uses of the cannabis plant.

http://www.economist.com/world/na/displaystory.cfm?story_id=9371878

GodOfThunder
01-04-2008, 11:16 AM
Marijuana smokers? Hemp has nothing to do with Marijuana... Again, asleep at the wheel.

In fact, if hemp were farmed, marijuana wouldn't be able to be harvested anywhere near it. Hemp pollen ruins marijuana crops.

So all those anti-drug people should be happy about hemp farming since those who grow marijuana would have their crops ruined.

Are you a complete moron?

Seriously.

You might know that. Some farmer in Iowa might know that.
But my 76 year old Grandfather in Florida and all his buddies and Joe Schmoe in upstate New York DON'T KNOW THAT!!!

To the majority of the voting public, if they hear anything about marijuana, they are going to think the candidate is a nutcase and not vote for them.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:17 AM
Sober North Dakotans Hope to Legalize Hemp
Dan Koeck for The New York Times

David C. Monson of North Dakota, who wants to grow hemp, says, "This is not any subversive thing like trying to legalize marijuana or whatever."

By MONICA DAVEY
Published: July 21, 2007
OSNABROCK, N.D. — David C. Monson seems an improbable soul to find at the leading edge of a national movement to legalize growing hemp, a plant that shares a species name, a genus type and, in many circles, a reputation, with marijuana.

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Dan Koeck for The New York Times
David C. Monson, a farmer, high school principal and Republican state legislator in North Dakota, calls his effort to grow industrial hemp to be used in items like clothing and lotions “practical agriculture.”
As Mr. Monson rolls past his wheat, barley and shimmering yellow fields of canola, he listens to Rush Limbaugh in his tractor. When he is not farming, he is the high school principal in nearby Edinburg, population 252. When he is not teaching, he is a Republican representative in Bismarck, the state capital, where his party dominates both houses of the legislature and the governor is a Republican.

“Look at me — do I look shady?” Mr. Monson, 56, asked, as he stood in work boots and a ball cap in the rocky, black dirt that spans mile after mile of North Dakota’s nearly empty northern edge. “This is not any subversive thing like trying to legalize marijuana or whatever. This is just practical agriculture. We’re desperate for something that can make us some money.”

The rocks, the dirt, the cool, wet climate and a devastating crop fungus known as scab are part of what has landed North Dakota, of all states, at the forefront of a political battle more likely to have emerged somewhere “a little more rebellious,” as one farmer here put it, like California or Massachusetts.

Though federal authorities ban the growing of hemp, saying it contains tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive substance better known as THC in marijuana, six states this year considered legislation to allow farmers to grow industrial hemp, and Representative Ron Paul, Republican of Texas, introduced a bill in Washington that would let states allow such crops. In state legislatures, the advocates of hemp note that it contains mere traces of THC, and that hemp (grown in other countries) is already found here in clothes, lotions, snack bars, car door panels, insulation and more.

But no place has challenged the government as fiercely as North Dakota. Its legislature has passed a bill allowing farmers to grow industrial hemp and created an official licensing process to fingerprint such farmers and a global positioning system to track their fields. This year, Mr. Monson and another North Dakota farmer, with the support of the state’s agriculture commissioner, applied to the Drug Enforcement Administration for permission to plant fields of hemp immediately.

“North Dakota is really pushing the envelope on this one,” said Doug Farquhar, the program director for agriculture and rural development at the National Conference of State Legislatures. Legislatures in Maine, Montana, West Virginia and other states have passed bills allowing farmers to grow industrial hemp, said Alexis Baden-Mayer, the director of government relations for Vote Hemp, a group that presses for legalization, but those laws have not been carried out given federal drug law.

The Controlled Substances Act, federal authorities say, is unambiguous. “Basically hemp is considered the same as marijuana,” said Steve Robertson, a special agent for the D.E.A. at its Washington headquarters. “We’re an enforcement agency. We’re sworn to uphold the law.”

In the wide-open spaces of this state, an independent streak often runs through the politics, especially when it comes to federal mandates. But the fight over hemp is not political or philosophical, people here say. It lacks any counterculture wink, any hint of the fear some hemp opponents express that those trying to legalize hemp secretly hope to open the door to the plant’s more potent cousin.

This battle is decidedly, and Midwesternly, pragmatic. In 1993, scab, a fungus also known as Fusarium head blight, tore through this region, wiping out thousands of acres of wheat, a prized crop in North Dakota, where agriculture remains the largest element of the economy. Hard rains left water pooling in fields, giving scab an opening. The fungus has turned up in varying degrees ever since, even as farmers searched for a cure. On a recent afternoon, as rain pounded his 710 acres, Mr. Monson gloomily yanked the head off a stalk of his wheat, revealing for a visitor whitish, shriveled seeds — the telltale signs of scab.

When Mr. Monson began his efforts in the late 1990s, some here balked. He remembered John Dorso, a former Republican leader, rolling his eyes and asking Mr. Monson if he knew what he was getting mixed up in.

But hemp, Mr. Monson argued, offered an alternative for North Dakota’s crop rotation. Its tall stalks survive similarly cool and wet conditions in Canada, just 25 miles north of here, where it is legal. And it suits the rocky soil left behind here by glaciers, soil that threatens to tear up farm equipment for anyone who dares to plant crops like beets or potatoes beneath ground.

Years and studies and hearings later, few here have much to say against hemp — a reflection, it seems, of the state’s urgent wish to improve its economy. Recent hemp votes have passed the legislature with ease, though some questions linger. How big a market would there really be for hemp? What about the worries of drug enforcement officials, who say someone might sneak into a farmer’s field of harmless hemp and plant a batch of (similar-looking) marijuana?

Such fears, Mr. Monson insisted, are silly in North Dakota, which is the third least-populous state, with fewer than 640,000 people. This is the only state where voter registration is not required. (Everyone would know, the logic goes, if someone who did not belong tried to vote.) “You can’t go down to get the mail around here without someone knowing,” Mr. Monson said.

But Blair Thoreson, a Republican state representative who has voted against hemp measures, is less sure. “Everyone here knows everyone,” Mr. Thoreson said, “and yet we’ve had a huge problem here with homegrown methamphetamine labs, too.”

Roger Johnson, the state’s agriculture commissioner, said hemp fields would be the worst places to hide marijuana. Under state rules, Mr. Johnson said, such fields must be accessible for unannounced searches, day or night, and crops would be tested by the state. Also, he said, a field of hemp and marijuana would cross-pollinate, leaving the drug less potent.

“We’re not wide-eyed liberals,” Mr. Johnson said. “The D.E.A., they’re the crazy ones on this. This sort of illogical, indefensible position is not going to prevail forever.”

After receiving the first state licenses to grow hemp this year, Mr. Monson and Wayne Hauge, a farmer from Ray, on the opposite side of the state, filed applications with the D.E.A. in February.

Since then, the drug agency has not said yes or no. Given North Dakota’s growing season, it is too late to plant anything new this year. So in June, the two men— with financial help from Vote Hemp, the advocacy group — filed a lawsuit against the agency.

Mr. Robertson said in July that the agency was still reviewing the applications, but that he could not say much beyond that because of the litigation.

Like Mr. Monson, Mr. Hauge, who is 49 and farms barley, chickpeas and lentils on land his great-grandfather homesteaded in 1903, said his efforts were about economics, not politics — or drugs.

“I don’t advocate smoking anything,” said Mr. Hauge, who, when he is not farming, is a certified public accountant.

“I guess I’m not really known as much of a joker,” he added.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/21/us/21hemp.html?ex=1342670400&en=ca585f69f068810a&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss

Oliver
01-04-2008, 11:19 AM
-10

Explain how this is a nation-wide, "important issue" ... Are you a Marijuana smoker?

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:19 AM
Are you a complete moron?

Seriously.

You might know that. Some farmer in Iowa might know that.
But my 76 year old Grandfather in Florida and all his buddies and Joe Schmoe in upstate New York DON'T KNOW THAT!!!

To the majority of the voting public, if they hear anything about marijuana, they are going to think the candidate is a nutcase and not vote for them.

I'm not a moron but it sure sounds like your grandmother and the 'majority' of voters as you say are I guess if thats how you want to put it.

How about educate people instead of helping out with the prohibition machine.

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:23 AM
Explain how this is a nation-wide, "important issue" ... Are you a Marijuana smoker?

Who are you to ask me that question?

I feel sorry for Ron Paul for having some of you people for supporters. I really do. It's Pathetic.

You don't even agree with the views and issues of the candidate you are supporting, who are you 'Giuliani supporter incognito'?

Oliver
01-04-2008, 11:25 AM
Who are you to ask me that question?

I feel sorry for Ron Paul for having some of you people for supporters. I really do. It's Pathetic.

You don't even agree with the views and issues of the candidate you are supporting, who are you 'Giuliani supporter incognito'?

That wasn't an answer at all. Why is this an issue since
it isn't one of the big national issues in the current race?

Hyping your own agenda here? Or are you concerned about
the petroleum? *lol* Sure you are... :rolleyes:

romeshomey
01-04-2008, 11:33 AM
That wasn't an answer at all. Why is this an issue since
it isn't one of the big national issues in the current race?

Hyping your own agenda here? Or are you concerned about
the petroleum? *lol* Sure you are... :rolleyes:


Sure I am when I have to spend $20 to get not even a half a tank of gasoline and while all of our bad foreign policy in the middle east and south america is based on oil.

This should be one of the most important topics of this presidential race. It was a topic of the last election, problem is, the winner of the election hasn't done one thing about it since talking about it during the debates 4 years ago.

You have issues to just assume someone has an alterior motive.

Like I have said, pot growers would be against hemp farming as hemp ruins marijuana crops.

To grow marijuana if hemp were grown outdoors, it would have to be moved indoors to be grown without being ruined by the hemp.

I actually cannot believe you would attack me for supporting one of Ron Pauls number one issues that gets him support. Don't you think alot of his support is coming from those who want hemp and marijuana legalized? Why do you think there are Canadian seed sellers and farmers here on these forums helping to raise campaign money for Dr. Paul? Because it is one of his main issues that he talks about.

dougkeenan
01-04-2008, 11:41 AM
Great topic for flushing concern trolls.

I don't see you gaining non-farm voters, but you certainly won't lose any. Only DEA hates hemp at this point.

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 01:27 PM
all we'd have to do is organize this at the grassroots

get the 30 second spot of a farmer that's been wanting to grow hemp and talking about how profitable it is and how fast the industry is growing, etc et. Mention how hemp farming RUINS outdoor marijuana due to cross pollination and all the bases are covered. include a URL to a website where even more info is fleshed out and i dont see how anyone could spin this.

hell vote hemp could easily organize to run the ad for us. they know tons of people that want to farm hemp

Nailhead
01-04-2008, 01:30 PM
not important enough to risk polarizing older folks that have grown up with the drugs are bad mentality...those that are marijuana users and those that live in states with medical marijuana will find out about Ron Paul through their own circles (ie Cannibus Culture, local MJ clubs, head shops)

If you want to help out just visit your local bong shop and make sure they have a ron paul sign up

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 01:32 PM
You might know that. Some farmer in Iowa might know that.
But my 76 year old Grandfather in Florida and all his buddies and Joe Schmoe in upstate New York DON'T KNOW THAT!!!

yeah, but how long does it take for them to find out.

"Hemp farming would actually ruin Outdoor Marijuana because if the Hemp cross-pollinates with the Marijuana it causes the Marijuana plants to stop growing buds and other drug-producing parts. Hemp farming would essentially shut down any outdoor marijuana farming operations within a 5 mile radius"

5-15 seconds to read that then the old folks are going like "ahhh, I didn't know that" put it on a 30 second spot and run that 30 second spot EVERYWHERE. How would anyone contest that? You cant fight science

dougkeenan
01-04-2008, 01:33 PM
The topic is hemp, not medical marijuana. Both are good ideas according to Ron Paul.

Antonius Stone
01-04-2008, 01:37 PM
not important enough to risk polarizing older folks that have grown up with the drugs are bad mentality...those that are marijuana users and those that live in states with medical marijuana will find out about Ron Paul through their own circles (ie Cannibus Culture, local MJ clubs, head shops)

If you want to help out just visit your local bong shop and make sure they have a ron paul sign up

this has nothign to do with marijuana smokers WHY DOESNT ANYONE UNDERSTAND THIS?

Hemp is BAD for Marijuana. I come from CA and I can assure you that if Hemp were legalized Pot prices would go UP because suddenly all those folks that grow their pot outdoors wouldn't be able to anymore and a majority of the weed in CA is grown outdoors.
Hemp cultivation SHUTS DOWN outdoor Marijuana growth, thus narrowing down the Cops' grower targets to "grow houses". Legalization of Hemp would help the Po.

All we need to do is put the information into the heads of the ignorant because once this info has been read, it can't be unread.

and if you think the industry is not important its ~45$ Million dollar a year industry, and it runs just off of imported hemp. We already have the factories and such necessary to make Hemp granola bars as prevalent as regular-ass granola bars we just need more raw mats. And as RomesHomey as said, Hemp is just about one of the healthiest foods you can eat and ANY health nut, whether they smoke pot or not, will tell you that.

dougkeenan
01-04-2008, 01:39 PM
Relax brother. Some of us understand you. :)