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View Full Version : Taking on the MSM




tangent4ronpaul
12-29-2007, 06:57 PM
From Ceil, (Meetup 637)

Nathan, This has gone beyond the grassroots efforts. I’ve seen Kent Snyders requests to stop calling on several of our boards, and we’re holding off per that request. BUT, there are many citizens groups out there beyond Dr. Paul’s grassroots we’ve received email from who have taken just about all they seem to want to from MSM, maybe particularly Fox News, but I tend to think it’s MSM in general. They’re ticked. They’re tired of it. The people have had enough of MSM and the establishment trying to control them and their thoughts. I think this is out of our hands. It isn’t just Ron Paul’s grassroots who are protesting now.

Ceil,
I agree, and besides boycotts and mass calling/e-mails this seems like the best approach to take:

From the Dialy Paul:


Sticky: Make your voice heard at the FCC
On December 29th, 2007 NoVALady says:
Reposted from an email I received from a member of Ronpaul-1100@meetup.com:

Advertisers are not the only critical item for broadcasters. The other critical items are the FCC broadcast license for each affiliate and FCC approval for station purchases/mergers/trades. There are some key trigger phrases:

"FCC Public File"
"Not acting in the public interest"

1).At the beginning of EACH email or FAX to an affiliate (actual
broadcaster, not the network) ask that the comment be placed in their
"FCC Public File" . This "Public File" is reviewed by the FCC each time that station's license is up for renewal. Not getting a license renewed means the station is worthless. Give your opinion that the broadcaster is "not acting in the public interest." We can specifically start slamming each affiliate under the FCC "Equal Time Rule."

http://www.museum.tv/archives/etv/E/htmlE/equaltimeru/equaltimeru.htm

Comment to the FCC directly on the media ownership:

http://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/ecfs/Upload/

Check next to "Media Ownership Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking - Docket 06-121 " and make sure to comment how NewsCorp is "acting against the public interest."



FCC Public File complaint - how to
On December 29th, 2007 come and take it says:
The FCC is the government agency responsible for managing our public airwaves. They are the licensing authority for broadcasters (if they use an antenna to send out programming into the airwaves, the FCC is their authority). This applies to the individual broadcasting entities and not their affiliate (parent) network(s), but feedback to these local broadcasters that their network programming is not serving the local interests will definitely get back to corporate if enough of us speak out now.
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excerpts from the FCC website:

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/decdoc/public_and_broadcasting.html#COMPLAINT
http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Mass_Media/Factsheets/pubbroad.pdf

Public Participation in Licensing Process.

Renewal Applications. You can file a formal protest against a station by filing a formal petition to deny its renewal application, or by sending us an informal objection to the application. You must file a petition to deny the application by the end of the first day of the last full calendar month of the expiring license term. (For example, if the license expires on December 31, you have to file your petition by the end of the day on December 1). Before you file a petition to deny an application, you should check our rules and policies, to make sure that the petition complies with our procedural requirements. Before their licenses expire, stations have to broadcast announcements giving the date the license will expire, the date on which a renewal application must be filed, and the date by which formal petitions against it must be filed. You can file an informal objection at any point until we either grant or deny the application.

COMMENTS OR COMPLAINTS ABOUT A STATION
Comments to Stations and Networks. We encourage you to write directly to station management and network officials to comment on broadcast service. These are the people who are responsible for selecting the station's programs and announcements. Letters to stations and networks keep them informed about audience needs and interests, as well as on public opinion on specific material. Individuals and groups can often resolve problems with stations at the local level.
Letters and E-Mail from the Public. Commercial stations must keep written comments and suggestions received from the public regarding their operation for at least three years. Noncommercial stations are not subject to this requirement.

THE LOCAL PUBLIC INSPECTION FILE
Requirement to Maintain a Public Inspection File. Our rules require all TV and radio stations and applicants for new stations to maintain a file available for public inspection containing documents relevant to the station's operation. The public inspection file generally must be maintained at the station's main studio. To obtain the address and phone number of a station's main studio, consult your local telephone directory or call information.

[ In addition to the information that follows, the Enforcement Bureau has also posted related information at http://www.fcc.gov/eb/bccomplaints/pif.html]

Purpose of the File. As discussed above, stations have an obligation to serve their local community's needs and interests and to comply with certain programming and other rules. Because we do not monitor a station's programming, viewers and listeners are a vital source of information about the programming and possible rule violations. The documents in each station's public inspection file have information about the station that can assist the public in this important role.
As discussed above, all stations have an obligation to cover important issues facing their communities, to comply with requirements governing use of their facilities by candidates for public office, and to refrain from airing indecent programming during times children are likely to be in the audience. In addition, TV stations must air educational programming for children and limit the amount of advertising in children's programs. We encourage a continuing dialogue between broadcasters and members of the public to ensure that stations meet their obligations and remain responsive to the needs of the local community.

Viewing the Public Inspection File. The station must make its public inspection file available at its main studio at any time during regular business hours. Although you do not need to make an appointment to view the file, making one may be helpful both to the station and to you.
A station that chooses to maintain all or part of its public file in a computer database must provide you a computer terminal if you wish to review the file. If they want, they may also post their public file on the station's World Wide Web site on the Internet. If you want to view a station's public file over the Internet, you should ask the station if this is possible.

You may request copies of materials in the file by visiting the station in person. In addition, if the station's public file is located outside of its community of license (and you live within the station's service area and your request does not involve the station's political file), you may also request copies of materials in the file over the telephone. To facilitate telephone requests, we require stations to provide you a copy of this manual free of charge if you want one. The manual can help you identify documents you may ask to have mailed to you. Stations can assist callers in this process and answer questions you may have about the actual contents of the public file. This information includes, for example, the number of pages and time periods covered by a particular ownership or children's television programming report, or the types of applications actually maintained in the station's public file and the dates they were filed with the FCC. We also encourage (but do not require) stations to place the descriptions of their public files on any Internet home page that they maintain. You pay for any photocopies, and the station may require a guarantee of payment in advance (such as with a deposit or a credit card). The station must pay postage for copies requested by telephone.

Contents of the File. Stations must keep the following materials in their public inspection file:

The License. Stations must keep a copy of their current FCC license in the public file, together with any material documenting FCC-approved modifications to the license. The license reflects the station's technical parameters (authorized frequency, call letters, operating power, transmitter location, etc.), as well as any special conditions imposed by the FCC on the station's operation. The license also indicates when it was issued and when it will expire.
* Citizen Agreements. Stations must keep a copy of any written agreements they make with local viewers or listeners. These "citizen agreements" deal with programming, employment, or other issues of community concern. The station must keep these agreements in the public file for as long as they are in effect.

Political File. Stations must keep a file containing records of all requests for broadcast time made by or for a candidate for public office. The file must identify how the station responded to such requests and (if the request was granted) the charges made, a schedule of the time purchased, the times the spots actually aired, the rates charged, and the classes of time purchased. The file must also reflect any free time provided to a candidate. The station must keep the political records for two years after the spot airs. You can find the political broadcasting rules elsewhere in this manual.

Letters and E-Mail from the Public. Commercial stations must keep written comments and suggestions received from the public regarding their operation for at least three years. Noncommercial stations are not subject to this requirement.

* Issues/Programs List. Every three months, all stations must prepare and place in their file a list of programs that have provided their most significant treatment of community issues during the preceding three months. The list must briefly describe both the issue and the programming where the issue was discussed. The stations must keep these lists for the entire license term.
Public Participation in Licensing Process.

Renewal Applications. You can file a formal protest against a station by filing a formal petition to deny its renewal application, or by sending us an informal objection to the application. You must file a petition to deny the application by the end of the first day of the last full calendar month of the expiring license term. (For example, if the license expires on December 31, you have to file your petition by the end of the day on December 1). Before you file a petition to deny an application, you should check our rules and policies, to make sure that the petition complies with our procedural requirements. Before their licenses expire, stations have to broadcast announcements giving the date the license will expire, the date on which a renewal application must be filed, and the date by which formal petitions against it must be filed. You can file an informal objection at any point until we either grant or deny the application.

* Other Types of Applications. You can also participate formally in the application process when a station is sold (technically called an assignment of the license), undergoes a major stock transfer (technically called a transfer of control), or proposes major construction. The station owner is required to run a series of advertisements in the closest local newspaper when it files these types of applications. Later, the FCC will also run a "Public Notice" (all FCC Public Notices are placed on our Internet home page at www.fcc.gov) and open a 30 day period during which you may file petitions to deny these applications. As with renewal applications, you can also file an informal objection at any point until we either grant or deny the application.