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View Full Version : You probably won't like this article, but some of these points have merit




IHaveaDream
12-14-2007, 09:39 AM
The average conservative voter isn't going to understand or worry about secret societys, 9-11 conspiracies, or the dawning of a police state society. They're more concerned about how they're going to pay their bills and secure their nation from "evil". We need to be mindful of that as we head into these all important primaries.

http://blogcritics.org/archives/2007/12/14/033154.php

DrNoZone
12-14-2007, 09:42 AM
I STRONGLY agree with some of it, and STRONGLY disagree with some of it, but overall it was worth the read.

lynnf
12-14-2007, 09:55 AM
The average conservative voter isn't going to understand or worry about secret societys, 9-11 conspiracies, or the dawning of a police state society. They're more concerned about how they're going to pay their bills and secure their nation from "evil". We need to be mindful of that as we head into these all important primaries.

http://blogcritics.org/archives/2007/12/14/033154.php


this guy is right about one thing: the base of the party will be alienated some, whether from the behavior of unruly Ron Paul supporters or from resentment of the possibility of a loss of some or all of their power. also, we need every bit of support that we can get, so there's no sense in needlessly offending anyone. but we have to face it, some alienation will occur no matter what we do - just from our very presence in the process. it is wrong for it to be that way, but it is fact.

lynn

gb13
12-14-2007, 10:00 AM
I think ALL Ron Paul supporters should read this! Very good points.

I'm putting it on my website now.

kylejack
12-14-2007, 10:02 AM
I skipped over it on the Google News results because "blogcritics.org" has no real relevance.

Fyretrohl
12-14-2007, 10:04 AM
I think what is really needed is to get some specific plans put forward. Something like:

'As President, I would start saving money by reducing the following departments in the following way. The money saved by getting rid of these programs for the DoEducation would then be sent to the states on a prorated basis to spend as they see fit locally, until a tax cut is approved to bring back the balance.

Jagwarr
12-14-2007, 10:13 AM
Very few valid points in my opinon. The author seems to think that the grassroots community decides on Dr. Paul platform, which of course it does not. This article bases about 80% of its comments thinking that the supporters are deciding the platform.

I was going to give examples but after reading it again the blog really doesn't make any sense at all, for the above reasons.

The only good point in the blog is the basic message that has been stated here on these forums a thousand times and that is that our grassroots community needs to be more considerate at times.

coboman
12-14-2007, 10:23 AM
I think he is right in the fact that most grassroots supporters are not your average Republican Primary Voter.

We need a panel of Republican Primary Voters telling us their ways, and listening to them.

The Republican Party is their home, and we are guests. We must listen to them when they tell us how to behave.

robofx
12-14-2007, 10:26 AM
The average conservative voter isn't going to understand or worry about secret societys, 9-11 conspiracies, or the dawning of a police state society. They're more concerned about how they're going to pay their bills and secure their nation from "evil". We need to be mindful of that as we head into these all important primaries.

I think this idea that we have to hide the message of freedom or somehow dilute it in order for it to be palatable to people and get them to vote for Paul is terribly misguided.

I mean, what's the point of Paul winning the presidency if he has to sit in the oval office & pretend he doesn't believe in the Constitution and in freedom? If Americans don't want freedom, then they shouldn't vote for Ron Paul! It's as simple as that.

If the only way we can get him elected is to tell them what they want to hear, then there's no point. It's useless to sneak him into the White House, since the Constitution and freedom will not be re-implemented anyway if Americans don't want them to be.

I mean, let's face it - it's gonna take a lot more than just a President Paul to get the supreme law of the land enforced. It's going to take an entire Congress - along with state & local government offices - to be filled with Constitutionalists.

And the only way *that's* going to happen is if a majority of Americans WANT it.

tsetsefly
12-14-2007, 01:43 PM
I agree with this article, we need to be seen more as alienated republicans than non mainstreamers taking over the republican party:

Someone needs to get the Paul campaign under control. It worries me that so many conservative libertarians and libertarian Republicans are letting their enthusiasm for the success Paul has had so far override their common sense so that they are ignoring this issue which absolutely will bring the campaign they've been pinning their hopes on to a crashing halt before the first flowers of Spring have bloomed.

You can't show up in a hotel ballroom full of people who look like they graduated high school with Ronald Reagan carrying signs and shouting slogans and not expect them to go all Berkeley-in-69 on your ass and shut you down. They've got their uppers out and they're sucking on rubber chicken and as far as they can tell you're the next generation of the hippy apocalypse come back for vengeance. And admit it, they're right. You got your rage against 'the man' from your parents who were smoking a fatty and wearing sandals up in the Haight until you came along to teach them a new definition of 'generation gap'. I know that being part of 'the revolution' feels like victory, but it makes you arrogant and primes you to go too far and ends in disappointment and defeat.

You're not going to get the Republican nomination while blatantly giving the GOP the finger at the same time. I think Ron Paul probably understands this, but he has almost no control over his followers. They are intoxicated by hope and the dream of a grassroots revolution and show no understanding of the practicalities of winning a party nomination.

When the Paul campaign fails, as it inevitably will on the course it is currently following, the blame will rest squarely on the shoulders of supporters who wanted all the benefits of running within a major political party but were unwilling to make any compromises or even pay basic respect to its traditions and institutions. Self-righteous ideologues make terrible politicians, they don't win elections and they're dragging Ron Paul down with them.