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View Full Version : Indvidually written vs photocopied




OferNave
12-09-2007, 10:33 PM
I was advised by one of the organizers to write one letter then make color copies, because it looks almost as good, but is much more efficient. I intend to do 500 over the next few days.

Do you guys think it's worth the time to handwrite each one? Try to quantify it. Compare the time of each strategy, and compare what you guess is the effectiveness of each strategy. For example, if handwriting a latter takes 20 times longer than simply stuffing envelopes, but is only 3 times as effective, then is it a good use of time?

We have 800k letters to write in the next few weeks...

OferNave
12-09-2007, 10:36 PM
I should add that I plan to hand-address each envelope, just not the letter.

TechnoGuyRob
12-09-2007, 10:42 PM
I think you should write as many as you can by hand, and on the last possible day, finish the ones you haven't done by photocopy.

seapilot
12-09-2007, 10:45 PM
I think you should write as many as you can by hand, and on the last possible day, finish the ones you haven't done by photocopy.

+1 Handwritten are more likely to be read. Photo copy more likely circular filed.

seapilot
12-09-2007, 10:48 PM
I should add that I plan to hand-address each envelope, just not the letter.

This is an excellent idea as well. If you can afford to send 500 photo copies would save your hand from cramping up!:rolleyes:

fortilite
12-09-2007, 11:00 PM
I would prefer computer printed over color copied. That way you can have the persons name in the salutation.

"Dear Mary" instead of "Dear Iowan"

Also I always had a problem writing on color copied paper (laser), there is a layer that gets formed on them that makes signing them difficult with out the proper pen.

OferNave
12-09-2007, 11:11 PM
I would prefer computer printed over color copied. That way you can have the persons name in the salutation.

"Dear Mary" instead of "Dear Iowan"

Also I always had a problem writing on color copied paper (laser), there is a layer that gets formed on them that makes signing them difficult with out the proper pen.

Pros and cons. Computer printed allows for personalization, but then looks corporate. Hand-written and copied doesn't allow for personalization, but even though it's a copy, the hand-writing might get a lot of attention and still give it a personal feel.

There are good arguments on both sides.

MozoVote
12-09-2007, 11:32 PM
I compromise a bit. Print the letters on a laserjet - but make a short 3 line introduction at the top that is hand written. I sign them and address them by hand, and include one slim.

OferNave
12-10-2007, 01:24 AM
I compromise a bit. Print the letters on a laserjet - but make a short 3 line introduction at the top that is hand written. I sign them and address them by hand, and include one slim.

Good compromise! Can you post your intro here?

MozoVote
12-10-2007, 07:38 AM
My intro is



Dear {Iowan}
My name is _____ . I am a volunteer in {my city} and have sent this letter to you at my own expense, to ask you to take part in the upcoming caucus, and help bring needed change.


Just write whatever sounds natural to you, though. If it becomes too polished then it will sound "mass marketed".

Leslie Webb
12-10-2007, 08:35 AM
I have tried writing and printing. When printing I print the letter out one by one and use the person's name in the salutation. Then at the bottom of the page I write in information about the web-site and the Iowa call number. I also write in info about the local meetup group. For example, "Cedar Rapids has a Ron Paul support group with 94 members. Curt Revson is the leader. To find out about its activities, google ronpaul.meetup.com/232/ "

Writing takes a long time. It is probably more effective, but I have only done about 20 letters. I may try writing a short note rather than a long letter. I use 6 by 9 inch envelopes and include a mosaic flyer. The flyer should be persuasive enough with a short note.

argounova
12-12-2007, 03:11 PM
i'm thinking short handwritten note with slim jim?