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View Full Version : Here we go again? Passenger quarantined at Newark Airport after treating Ebola patients in Afr




francisco
10-24-2014, 06:46 PM
NEWARK (WABC) --
A health care worker arriving from Africa who was placed in mandatory quarantine as part of a new policy by the governors of New York and New Jersey has developed a fever.

The state health department said the woman had no symptoms upon arrival at Newark Liberty Airport, but on Friday night she developed the fever and is now in isolation and being evaluated at University Hospital in Newark.


Read more:

http://7online.com/health/passenger-quarantined-after-treating-ebola-patients-in-africa-develops-fever/364779/

Dr.3D
10-24-2014, 06:51 PM
I read the article, but I didn't notice any place in it where it was mentioned when this person landed. I just want to know how long after the woman was placed in quarantine, she developed a fever.

Edit:
I guess my reading skills have diminished. Reading the article again, I see where it mentions "earlier today." :o

had no symptoms upon arrival at Newark Liberty International Airport earlier today.

francisco
10-24-2014, 07:01 PM
Another source. It says that that the person arrived today, Friday 10/24/14.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/woman-in-isolation-with-fever-after-newark-landing-ny-nj-announce-new-ebola-quarantine-policy-1.1117698


The healthcare worker who had contact with Ebola patients and was quarantined earlier today after arriving at Newark Airport now has a fever and is in isolation and under evaluation at University Hospital in Newark, according to the state Health Department.
“There is no more voluntary quarantine in New Jersey because you can't count on people to do it.” - Governor Christie

The woman, who had traveled in Ebola-ravaged West Africa, reported having had contact with patients there when questioned at the airport. That triggered state officials to put her under a mandatory 21-day quarantine as part of a new policy announced Friday by the governors of New York and New Jersey.

When she arrived, the woman, a U.S. citizen and healthcare worker who began her travel in Sierra Leone, did not show any symptoms. But state officials ordered the quarantine Friday afternoon, because she reported having had contact with people who had died of Ebola. She also said she was wearing protective equipment at the time of the contact.



She is not from this area and had come here to visit someone here, Christie said. Christie said officials were working out where the woman will be quarantined.
- See more at: http://www.northjersey.com/news/woman-in-isolation-with-fever-after-newark-landing-ny-nj-announce-new-ebola-quarantine-policy-1.1117698#sthash.HqDu4zos.dpuf

Zippyjuan
10-24-2014, 07:04 PM
Looks like she arrived earlier in the day. http://www.northjersey.com/news/woman-in-isolation-with-fever-after-newark-landing-ny-nj-announce-new-ebola-quarantine-policy-1.1117698


The healthcare worker who had contact with Ebola patients and was quarantined earlier today after arriving at Newark Airport now has a fever and is in isolation and under evaluation at University Hospital in Newark, according to the state Health Department.

(beat me to it)

Dr.3D
10-24-2014, 07:06 PM
Another source. It says that that the person arrived today, Friday 10/24/14.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/woman-in-isolation-with-fever-after-newark-landing-ny-nj-announce-new-ebola-quarantine-policy-1.1117698


Looks like she arrived earlier in the day. http://www.northjersey.com/news/woman-in-isolation-with-fever-after-newark-landing-ny-nj-announce-new-ebola-quarantine-policy-1.1117698



(beat me to it)
Thanks. I'll bet the aspirin/fever reducer wore off.

Anti Federalist
10-24-2014, 07:08 PM
“There is no more voluntary quarantine in New Jersey because you can't count on people to do it.” - Governor Christie

And so it begins.

specsaregood
10-24-2014, 07:18 PM
And so it begins.

Don't worry, anybody with Ebola just now knows to fly into the many other international airports around the US without this in place.

kcchiefs6465
10-24-2014, 07:21 PM
And so it begins.
That's what people want.

Probably the majority here. Undoubtedly the majority of Americans.

Pussies.

navy-vet
10-24-2014, 08:00 PM
Thanks. I'll bet the aspirin/fever reducer wore off.
I was thinking ibuprofen...

presence
10-24-2014, 08:02 PM
The patients with the highest level of possible exposure will be automatically quarantined for 21 days at a government-regulated facility.

Can I plea for house arrest and a GPS anklet?

heavenlyboy34
10-24-2014, 08:09 PM
And so it begins.

Maybe I'll have the honor of meeting you in a concentration camp or something. :cool:

twomp
10-24-2014, 09:30 PM
Maybe I'll have the honor of meeting you in a concentration camp or something. :cool:

I doubt it. He will probably be executed way before that for resisting arrest.

Anti Federalist
10-24-2014, 09:39 PM
Maybe I'll have the honor of meeting you in a concentration camp or something. :cool:

I'll be sure to save us a tin of potted meat.

http://spierhead.com/pmfp/hormel.jpg

Anti Federalist
10-24-2014, 09:40 PM
I doubt it. He will probably be executed way before that for resisting arrest.

They may or may not get me.

I think phill will put up a fight.

orenbus
10-24-2014, 11:18 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3-EJqbrmQk

Nirvikalpa
10-25-2014, 12:07 AM
Ah, my favorite hospital.

Just a fever, so far. Could be malaria...

anaconda
10-25-2014, 12:44 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGb5IweiYG8

francisco
10-25-2014, 10:31 AM
UPDATE:

Health Care Worker Tests Negative For Ebola In NJ, Stays In Quarantine


October 25, 2014 8:36 AM ET

A woman who was put in isolation at Newark Liberty International Airport remains under quarantine, despite a preliminary test that found she did not have the deadly Ebola virus.

The health care worker was isolated Friday as she returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa. She had no symptoms of the disease, but after she developed a fever, she was taken to a nearby hospital.

"The patient continues to be quarantined and remains in isolation and under observation at University Hospital in Newark," New Jersey's health department said early Saturday, in a statement announcing preliminary test results.

Read More:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/10/25/358795868/health-care-worker-tests-negative-for-ebola-in-nj-stays-in-quarantine

Zippyjuan
10-25-2014, 11:56 AM
Somebody raised the concern that a mandatory isolation of three weeks after returning would discourage more volunteers from going to Africa to try to fight the ebola crisis there. On the other hand, without a quarantine, you risk it getting released here.

tangent4ronpaul
10-25-2014, 03:20 PM
The nurse is pissed and has every right to be. Her blood test came back NEGATIVE for Ebola, but she's on ice for 3 weeks anyway. Her first person account of what happened to her:
http://www.dallasnews.com/ebola/headlines/20141025-uta-grad-isolated-at-new-jersey-hospital-as-part-of-ebola-quarantine.ece

So is MSF:
http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/article/msf-nurse-held-isolation-new-jersey

as is the ACLU:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/25/obama-facts-not-fear-public-response-ebola-usa

Civil liberties activists, meanwhile, raised concerns about the constitutionality of the new rules, warning they could discourage health workers from volunteering to fight Ebola in Africa.
...
There were signs that top health officials in New York City were also taken by surprise by the tough new rules, which go beyond recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Preventon (CDC), the agency managing the federal response to Ebola in the US.


MSF Protocols for Staff Returning from Ebola-Affected Countries
http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/article/msf-protocols-staff-returning-ebola-affected-countries

MSF pre-identifies health facilities in the United States that can assist and manage the care of our staff members in the event they develop symptoms after their return home. This pre-identification practice is carried out in coordination with the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and departments of health at state and local levels.

Upon returning to the United States, each MSF staff member goes through a thorough debriefing process, during which they are informed of our guidelines.

The guidelines include the following instructions:

1. Check temperature two times per day
2. Finish regular course of malaria prophylaxis (malaria symptoms can mimic Ebola symptoms)
3. Be aware of relevant symptoms, such as fever
4. Stay within four hours of a hospital with isolation facilities
5. Immediately contact the MSF-USA office if any relevant symptoms develop

These guidelines are consistent with those provided by the CDC to people returning from one of the Ebola-affected countries in West Africa. MSF is also implementing new federal guidelines outlining reporting requirements for people returning from Ebola affected countries.

Steps Doctors Without Borders takes to ensure the health and well being of its staff and the community at large:

If returned staff members do not live within four hours of appropriate medical facilities, MSF will ensure they are accommodated appropriately during the 21-day incubation period.

In the unlikely event that a staff person develops Ebola-like symptoms within the 21-day period, he/she is advised to immediately contact MSF and to refrain from traveling on public transportation. Local health authorities are immediately notified.

As long as a returned staff member does not experience any symptoms, normal life can proceed. Family, friends, and neighbors can be assured that a returned staff person who does not present symptoms is not contagious and does not put them at risk. Self-quarantine is neither warranted nor recommended when a person is not displaying Ebola-like symptoms.

However, returned staff members are discouraged from returning to work during the 21-day period. Field assignments are extremely challenging and people need to regain energy. In addition, people who return to work too quickly could catch a simple bacterial or viral infection (common cold, bronchitis, flu etc.) that may have symptoms similar to Ebola. This can create needless stress and anxiety for the person involved and his/her colleagues. For this reason, MSF continues to provide salaries to returned staff for the 21-day period.

-t

Danke
10-25-2014, 03:41 PM
I got in trouble not too long ago trying to quarantine a flight attendant who had been to an Ebola hot zone. I guess her travels weren't recent enough?

Brian4Liberty
10-25-2014, 03:56 PM
She never had a fever.


I am a nurse who has just returned to the U.S. after working with Doctors Without Borders in Sierra Leone - an Ebola-affected country. I have been quarantined in New Jersey. This is not a situation I would wish on anyone, and I am scared for those who will follow me.

I am scared about how health care workers will be treated at airports when they declare that they have been fighting Ebola in West Africa. I am scared that, like me, they will arrive and see a frenzy of disorganization, fear and, most frightening, quarantine.

I arrived at the Newark Liberty International Airport around 1 p.m. on Friday, after a grueling two-day journey from Sierra Leone. I walked up to the immigration official at the airport and was greeted with a big smile and a “hello.”

I told him that I have traveled from Sierra Leone and he replied, a little less enthusiastically: “No problem. They are probably going to ask you a few questions.”

He put on gloves and a mask and called someone. Then he escorted me to the quarantine office a few yards away. I was told to sit down. Everyone that came out of the offices was hurrying from room to room in white protective coveralls, gloves, masks, and a disposable face shield.

One after another, people asked me questions. Some introduced themselves, some didn’t. One man who must have been an immigration officer because he was wearing a weapon belt that I could see protruding from his white coveralls barked questions at me as if I was a criminal.

Two other officials asked about my work in Sierra Leone. One of them was from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They scribbled notes in the margins of their form, a form that appeared to be inadequate for the many details they are collecting.

I was tired, hungry and confused, but I tried to remain calm. My temperature was taken using a forehead scanner and it read a temperature of 98. I was feeling physically healthy but emotionally exhausted.

Three hours passed. No one seemed to be in charge. No one would tell me what was going on or what would happen to me.

I called my family to let them know that I was OK. I was hungry and thirsty and asked for something to eat and drink. I was given a granola bar and some water. I wondered what I had done wrong.

Four hours after I landed at the airport, an official approached me with a forehead scanner. My cheeks were flushed, I was upset at being held with no explanation. The scanner recorded my temperature as 101.

The female officer looked smug. “You have a fever now,” she said.

I explained that an oral thermometer would be more accurate and that the forehead scanner was recording an elevated temperature because I was flushed and upset.

I was left alone in the room for another three hours. At around 7 p.m., I was told that I must go to a local hospital. I asked for the name and address of the facility. I realized that information was only shared with me if I asked.

Eight police cars escorted me to the University Hospital in Newark. Sirens blared, lights flashed. Again, I wondered what I had done wrong.

I had spent a month watching children die, alone. I had witnessed human tragedy unfold before my eyes. I had tried to help when much of the world has looked on and done nothing.

At the hospital, I was escorted to a tent that sat outside of the building. The infectious disease and emergency department doctors took my temperature and other vitals and looked puzzled. “Your temperature is 98.6,” they said. “You don't have a fever but we were told you had a fever.”

After my temperature was recorded as 98.6 on the oral thermometer, the doctor decided to see what the forehead scanner records. It read 101. The doctor felts my neck and looked at the temperature again. “There’s no way you have a fever,” he said. “Your face is just flushed.”

My blood was taken and tested for Ebola. It came back negative.

I sat alone in the isolation tent and thought of many colleagues who will return home to America and face the same ordeal. Will they be made to feel like criminals and prisoners?
...
http://www.dallasnews.com/ebola/headlines/20141025-uta-grad-isolated-at-new-jersey-hospital-as-part-of-ebola-quarantine.ece

Anti Federalist
10-25-2014, 04:11 PM
She never had a fever.

Typical government.

First response? A weak, ham fisted cluster fuck.

Second response? A heavy handed crackdown.

green73
10-25-2014, 04:15 PM
SMH. Don't you guys read the news? lol.

The quarantine is mandatory for all people arriving in NY/NJ from the devil lands.

tangent4ronpaul
10-25-2014, 04:47 PM
From the MSF statement:


She has been issued with an order of quarantine, which does not clearly indicate how long she must remain in isolation.

While she is being provided with food and water, the tent is not heated and she is dressed in uncomfortable paper scrubs. She was permitted to bring personal belongings into the tent.

This tent was set up next to the hospital... Sounds like a A+ isolation ward... :rolleyes:

If they are going to quarantine all returning health workers for 21 days, maybe MSF should set up their own quarantine unit for them... say in the Bahama's...

-t

tangent4ronpaul
10-25-2014, 04:51 PM
I got in trouble not too long ago trying to quarantine a flight attendant who had been to an Ebola hot zone. I guess her travels weren't recent enough?

Next time don't chain her in your BDSM dungeon.. ;)

-t

presence
10-25-2014, 04:53 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/nyregion/nurse-in-newark-tests-negative-for-ebola.html?_r=0


She described being held in isolation for about seven hours at Newark Liberty International Airport on Friday, left alone for long stretches and given only a granola bar when she said she was hungry.

[]

“Mandatory quarantine of people exhibiting no symptoms and when not medically necessary raises serious constitutional concerns about the state abusing its police powers,” Mr. Ofer said. “Ebola is a public health issue, and the government’s response should be driven by science and facts and not by fear.”
Nicolas P. Terry, director of the Hall Center for Law and Health at the McKinney School of Law at Indiana University, said Ms. Hickox could challenge her quarantine on the grounds that she was being held without cause. But he said if the order was directed only at travelers in countries affected by Ebola and did not say they had to be symptomatic, then her only choice would be to challenge the validity of the order itself.
“If she fits the definitions and the symptoms of the New Jersey emergency regulation, they can keep her,” Mr. Terry said.
Ms. Hickox’s mother said she had sent her daughter a text message asking if she thought she would be detained when she returned home: “She texted back: LOL that’s not going to happen.”

tangent4ronpaul
10-25-2014, 05:17 PM
Party at Kaci's place!

I'll bring the hooka. Who wants to bring the bongo drums, 420 and beer? :D

3289

-t

green73
10-25-2014, 05:23 PM
Party at Kaci's place!

I'll bring the hooka. Who wants to bring the bongo drums, 420 and beer? :D

3289

-t

:rolleyes:

presence
10-25-2014, 07:06 PM
I play djembe!

Danke
10-25-2014, 09:32 PM
Next time don't chain her in your BDSM dungeon.. ;)

-t

I didn't even bring her down there.