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Anti Federalist
01-22-2014, 11:19 PM
So, of course, to find out if somebody's talking about "bad things" we have to listen to everything.


Bill Gates Says Government Spying Isn’t Always Bad

http://www.infowars.com/bill-gates-says-government-spying-isnt-always-bad/

Bill Gates has strong opinions when it comes to world poverty, but the tech titan-turned-philanthropist takes the middle ground on government spying.

Speaking with Fusion’s Jorge Ramos in an interview set to air on Tuesday, Gates said the U.S. needs to strike a balance between protecting citizens’ privacy and identifying national security threats.

“At the end of the day…we want to stop terrorism, we want to see if someone’s talking about nuclear weapons, or bioterrorism or various bad things,” Gates said. “So it’s not as though government surveillance is absolutely bad in all cases…I think it’s a valuable debate and I do think we can balance the two goals.”

enhanced_deficit
01-22-2014, 11:40 PM
I saw last part of his interview last night on PBS accidentally, had no idea he was such a moron tool on issues outside software. He already came across as a dullard medicore person after I read his book "speed of light" few years ago.
Or maybe he has selfish interest too due to backdoors he lhelped create after meetings at WH.

Czolgosz
01-22-2014, 11:42 PM
"Americans" are THE threat to national security.

Origanalist
01-22-2014, 11:44 PM
And I should care what he thinks because......?

NewRightLibertarian
01-22-2014, 11:46 PM
And I should care what he thinks because......?

He's a 'philanthropist.' He just wants you to take the vaccines and GMOs because he cares about you. What a swell guy.

Origanalist
01-22-2014, 11:54 PM
He's a 'philanthropist.' He just wants you to take the vaccines and GMOs because he cares about you. What a swell guy.

I feel all warm and fuzzy.

Occam's Banana
01-23-2014, 12:10 AM
[...] had no idea he was such a moron tool on issues outside software.

Is there some reason to think he's not a "moron tool" on software issues, too?

RickyJ
01-23-2014, 12:56 AM
He is right, it isn't always bad, it is essential to spy on enemies of the USA for the safety of this nation, but they have no right to spy on Americans without a warrant and we should make sure that stops and the people responsible for it go to jail for a very long time.

However Bill Gates should not be talking about this if he wants Windows to make a come back. I guess he doesn't give a crap.

RickyJ
01-23-2014, 01:03 AM
Is there some reason to think he's not a "moron tool" on software issues, too?

I think he is, Windows absolutely sucks. With all their money and ability to hire the best they still can't beat a free OS like Linux in security and features.

DamianTV
01-23-2014, 02:19 AM
And I should care what he thinks because......?

Because the Group, Stats Quo, or because "he is better than you because he has more money" has told you what your opinion should be, comrade!

Only approved opinions may be expressed publicly.

Rudeman
01-23-2014, 02:42 AM
I think he is, Windows absolutely sucks. With all their money and ability to hire the best they still can't beat a free OS like Linux in security and features.

Haha. This reminds me of one of my teachers, he would constantly talk about how much Windows sucks and how awful Bill Gates was. The ironic thing was he did it while teaching a Visual Basic class.

RickyJ
01-23-2014, 02:46 AM
Haha. This reminds me of one of my teachers, he would constantly talk about how much Windows sucks and how awful Bill Gates was. The ironic thing was he did it while teaching a Visual Basic class.

Are you one of the few who thinks that Windows doesn't suck? Most people don't use Windows because they like it, they use it because they don't even know there is a choice.

Rudeman
01-23-2014, 03:46 AM
Are you one of the few who thinks that Windows doesn't suck? Most people don't use Windows because they like it, they use it because they don't even know there is a choice.

I use windows for its compatibility.

DamianTV
01-23-2014, 03:59 AM
Govt Spying isnt bad if they're paying shitloads of taxpayer dollars for you to do the spying for them.

donnay
01-23-2014, 07:41 AM
Oh come on now...Bill Gates is a good man who only wants the best for everyone. He has his own heirloom seed vault, and he pays lots of money for geoengineering and he wants mosquitoes to give you your vaccines instead of wasting your time rolling up our sleeves at a doctors office. What more can you ask for? He's the "go-to" man.

Root
01-23-2014, 07:46 AM
Once I switched to Linux: $ grep 'everything Bill Gates says' > /dev/null

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 07:51 AM
I think he is, Windows absolutely sucks. With all their money and ability to hire the best they still can't beat a free OS like Linux in security and features.

You assume that they want to.
I am convinced that they have been working on spying all along,, and their OS is designed for that.

It is defective by design. Intentional.

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 07:56 AM
I use windows for its compatibility.

Virus Compatibility
Trojan Compatibility
Malware compatibility

NSA Compatibility.

NO Thanks.
I use it for a game.. only.

Warlord
01-23-2014, 07:58 AM
Virus Compatibility
Trojan Compatibility
Malware compatibility

NSA Compatibility.

NO Thanks.
I use it for a game.. only.



LOL!!!\

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 08:11 AM
So, of course, to find out if somebody's talking about "bad things" we have to listen to everything.


Bill Gates Says Government Spying Isn’t Always Bad

http://www.infowars.com/bill-gates-says-government-spying-isnt-always-bad/

Bill Gates has strong opinions when it comes to world poverty, but the tech titan-turned-philanthropist takes the middle ground on government spying.

Speaking with Fusion’s Jorge Ramos in an interview set to air on Tuesday, Gates said the U.S. needs to strike a balance between protecting citizens’ privacy and identifying national security threats.

“At the end of the day…we want to stop terrorism, we want to see if someone’s talking about nuclear weapons, or bioterrorism or various bad things,” Gates said. “So it’s not as though government surveillance is absolutely bad in all cases…I think it’s a valuable debate and I do think we can balance the two goals.”

Reason #95 why I am glad I've never bought MS windows in my life.

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 08:14 AM
Once I switched to Linux: $ grep 'everything Bill Gates says' > /dev/null

that is perfect. Now if we can only find the terminal for the universe... I'm pretty sure that booting into single-user is above my paygrade in this case.

Warlord
01-23-2014, 08:19 AM
I switched to mac gunny and have never been happier. Windows sucks.

Root
01-23-2014, 08:21 AM
that is perfect. Now if we can only find the terminal for the universe... I'm pretty sure that booting into single-user is above my paygrade in this case.
Thanks. Yeah above my pay grade too.

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 08:22 AM
I use windows for its compatibility.

Compatibility with what exactly? Other than a couple games what can you do with Windows that you can't do elsewhere? Even M$ games are now by and large being written so they only play on XBox and not the PC. If a specific piece of software doesn't run on Linux, Unix, or Mac; there is probably a different piece of software that is compatible, or at least imports/exports compatibility.

TruckinMike
01-23-2014, 08:24 AM
You assume that they want to.
I am convinced that they have been working on spying all along,, and their OS is designed for that.

It is defective by design. Intentional.

+rep for truth!

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 08:44 AM
I switched to mac gunny and have never been happier. Windows sucks.

I started with Mac in 1986. Now I use the Mac for my home machine, and use a couple different flavors of *ux for work.

Oh, I guess I still use the Mac for turning VHS into DVD...

I am currently messing around with trying to make OpenBSD a useable consumer-level system, and that's harder than it sounds. I already have a couple instances of FreeBSD up and useable (which is way harder than Linux, mind you), but where FreeBSD is a couple orders of magnitude more secure than Linux, OpenBSD is about ten orders of magnitude more secure than FreeBSD. This is for my "NSA-Proof Computer" project, and I'm starting to think if I base it in OpenBSD like I want to it'll be so tightly locked down that the End User won't be able to install and use ANY new software, not even the benign stuff, because you pretty much have to first open up holes in the system to provide app functionality for any new application.

So I'm weighing a decision right now; I can produce an image in OpenBSD where the end user can do most anything, OpenOffice, GIMP, music, video tools, yadda yadda, but once the image is set, that's pretty much carved in stone, it'll take legit expertise to add applications to it....but it would also be the most secure consumer-level computing environment ever produced. OR, I can make it in FreeBSD which is a little bit less secure (but still probably the most secure consumer-level stuff ever made) where folks can add (some) applications at will.

FreeBSD would be a lot more user friendly that way; but I'm thinking if people are buying a hyper-secure NSA-Proof computer platform, they may be OK with having their environment carved in stone, considering the trade-off that nobody on Earth will be able to hack them for any reason; and any additional functionality coming as 'official updates' from me.

Hmmmm. Decisions decisions. What a dilemma.

Warlord
01-23-2014, 08:45 AM
Gunny, I really like FreeBSD as a server OS. 4.x was the best one I think!

Good luck with your project

WM_in_MO
01-23-2014, 08:57 AM
Compatibility with what exactly? Other than a couple games what can you do with Windows that you can't do elsewhere? Even M$ games are now by and large being written so they only play on XBox and not the PC. If a specific piece of software doesn't run on Linux, Unix, or Mac; there is probably a different piece of software that is compatible, or at least imports/exports compatibility.
MUH STEAM LIBRARY!

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 09:10 AM
MUH STEAM LIBRARY!

Steam for Mac (http://store.steampowered.com/browse/mac)

Steam for Linux (http://store.steampowered.com/browse/linux/)

:p :D

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 09:11 AM
Gunny, I really like FreeBSD as a server OS. 4.x was the best one I think!

Good luck with your project

Thanks! I'm just glad that the BSD fork took security very seriously, and open source means there aren't any back doors carved in for anybody. It makes for a great foundation for an NSA-Proof computer. :)

HOLLYWOOD
01-23-2014, 09:21 AM
All you need to know...

Microsoft has basically a monopoly and who is their biggest customer? GOVERNMENT

Nice cozy backroom/backdoor deal.


Microsoft has stolen so much technology from other companies through the years... they actually would site down and figure out how much it would cost them in legal fees and settlements. Microsoft has put high tech startups and small businesses out of business and of course there's the buyouts to end competition forever.

Gates and his cohorts are scumbags... they will never have my respect... NEVER

PS: Remember with the economic collapse in 2008 and on... Bates & Balmer fired all those employees and shipped in their H1B specials to refill those positions.

invisible
01-23-2014, 09:25 AM
Compatibility with what exactly? Other than a couple games what can you do with Windows that you can't do elsewhere? Even M$ games are now by and large being written so they only play on XBox and not the PC. If a specific piece of software doesn't run on Linux, Unix, or Mac; there is probably a different piece of software that is compatible, or at least imports/exports compatibility.


Firewire ports. It's impossible to get anything from firewire-based A/V hardware into the computer unless you rewrite the kernel! There are lots of instructions available that claim to enable firewire ports in linux, but I've never found one that actually worked.

Installing drivers is a complete PITA in linux, and requires mucking about with command line mumbo jumbo for hours and hours. If linux came with an extremely complete and extremely detailed step by step "idiots guide" type of instruction documentation, it would be a LOT more usable for those who don't write code or aren't into the concept of using command line stuff to do everything. Linux would be great if it was actually user-friendly, and it was possible to use it with firewire-based hardware.

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 09:34 AM
Firewire ports. It's impossible to get anything from firewire-based A/V hardware into the computer unless you rewrite the kernel! There are lots of instructions available that claim to enable firewire ports in linux, but I've never found one that actually worked.

Installing drivers is a complete PITA in linux, and requires mucking about with command line mumbo jumbo for hours and hours. If linux came with an extremely complete and extremely detailed step by step "idiots guide" type of instruction documentation, it would be a LOT more usable for those who don't write code or aren't into the concept of using command line stuff to do everything. Linux would be great if it was actually user-friendly, and it was possible to use it with firewire-based hardware.

IEEE 1394 was developed and implemented by Apple.

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 09:43 AM
Firewire ports. It's impossible to get anything from firewire-based A/V hardware into the computer unless you rewrite the kernel! There are lots of instructions available that claim to enable firewire ports in linux, but I've never found one that actually worked.

Installing drivers is a complete PITA in linux, and requires mucking about with command line mumbo jumbo for hours and hours. If linux came with an extremely complete and extremely detailed step by step "idiots guide" type of instruction documentation, it would be a LOT more usable for those who don't write code or aren't into the concept of using command line stuff to do everything. Linux would be great if it was actually user-friendly, and it was possible to use it with firewire-based hardware.
Which Linux Distro ?

Ubuntu is widely popular,, though I don't care for it. Slackware is Rock Solid, but less (new) user friendly
I have been Using PCLinuxOS,, and it is very user friendly. Have it set up on my wife's machine,, and on my 88 yr old Mother's.
I seldom have had any issues with it,, since 2004. And those issues have been resolved with a bit of searching.
And I am no programmer.

Oh,, and user guides?
http://www.howtoforge.com/
http://www.linux.com/learn/new-user-guides

There are many,,and most Distros have helpful user forums.
http://pclinuxoshelp.com/index.php/Main_Page
http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/index.php

invisible
01-23-2014, 09:45 AM
IEEE 1394 was developed and implemented by Apple.

Right. Apple OS isn't linux. Yes, very similar, and one based upon the other, but there are significant differences, one of them being that the ability to use firewire ports was deliberately "written out" of the kernel in linux.

I'm not pro-windoze by any means. Windoze and linux BOTH suck. They just suck in completely different ways, and for completely different reasons. If linux had the "device manager" to install drivers, adequate documentation that actually made it user friendly, the check disc utility, and the capability to use firewire ports, it would blow windoze away.

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 09:57 AM
Right. Apple OS isn't linux. Yes, very similar, and one based upon the other, but there are significant differences, one of them being that the ability to use firewire ports was deliberately "written out" of the kernel in linux.

.

Bullshit.
https://ieee1394.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Introduction

FireWire-enabled Linux versions are 2.3 through 2.6. The subsystem has been included with the standard Linux kernel sources since version 2.3.40. The subsystem was also made available as a patch for Linux kernel version 2.2.

Development and maintenance exclusively concentrates on the current 2.6 kernel series now. No FireWire driver updates went into 2.4 for quite some time now.

Have you not looked at Linux since the 2.2 Kernel ?

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 10:08 AM
Right. Apple OS isn't linux. Yes, very similar, and one based upon the other, but there are significant differences, one of them being that the ability to use firewire ports was deliberately "written out" of the kernel in linux.

I'm not pro-windoze by any means. Windoze and linux BOTH suck. They just suck in completely different ways, and for completely different reasons. If linux had the "device manager" to install drivers, adequate documentation that actually made it user friendly, the check disc utility, and the capability to use firewire ports, it would blow windoze away.

And actually, it looks like the Linux kernel has supported FireWire native since version 2.3.40; January of 2000? - but support was dicey then. People writing apps to take advantage of FireWire in Linux recommend using Linux kernel versions 2.6.32 or later....looks like December 2nd or 3rd of 2009 release; and support for FireWire was perfected in Linux in kernel version 2.6.37, released January 2011.

So pretty much any Linux kernel post January 2011 should support Firewire as fully and easily as USB.

Coriander (http://damien.douxchamps.net/ieee1394/coriander/) provides a GUI for IEEE 1394 cameras for Linux

Ubuntu does all kinds of things (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/FireWire) with Firewire right out of the box.

Some FireWire applications (https://ieee1394.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Applications) for Linux

Some FireWire utilities (https://ieee1394.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Utilities) for Linux

I get that January 2011 is awfully late to finally perfect total support for this technology, but it's clearly there now.

It was there well enough to use with some minor tweaking as of December of 2009, and there was support if you knew how to hack your system as early as January of 2000.

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 10:18 AM
And actually, it looks like the Linux kernel has supported FireWire native since version 2.3.40; January of 2000? - but support was dicey then. People writing apps to take advantage of FireWire in Linux recommend using Linux kernel versions 2.6.32 or later....looks like December 2nd or 3rd of 2009 release; and support for FireWire was perfected in Linux in kernel version 2.6.37, released January 2011.

So pretty much any Linux kernel post January 2011 should support Firewire as fully and easily as USB.

Coriander (http://damien.douxchamps.net/ieee1394/coriander/) provides a GUI for IEEE 1394 cameras for Linux

Ubuntu does all kinds of things (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/FireWire) with Firewire right out of the box.

Some FireWire applications (https://ieee1394.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Applications) for Linux

Some FireWire utilities (https://ieee1394.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Utilities) for Linux

I get that January 2011 is awfully late to finally perfect total support for this technology, but it's clearly there now.

It was there well enough to use with some minor tweaking as of December of 2009, and there was support if you knew how to hack your system as early as January of 2000.

I started using it in 2004. There was Firewire support the (though I have no devices).
The Card reader on my old laptop was Texas Instruments . It was as easy as giving it a command,, to make it work. It just didn't auto load.
Perhaps if I was good at scrip writing,, one could be written for it.

invisible
01-23-2014, 10:30 AM
Bullshit.
https://ieee1394.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Introduction


Have you not looked at Linux since the 2.2 Kernel ?

Interesting! Thanks, I didn't know about this! No, I haven't attempted to mess with it for about 3 years. I assume that this info is more recent than that. Sounds like another little project to file away for the future, for sure. But it IS correct that firewire ability was "written out" of the kernel up until this 2.2 that you mention - I tried off and on for several years to make it work, had a "computer whiz" (I'm more of a hardware guy than a software / programming type) also give their best effort, we both consulted with various "linux gurus", did a LOT of research, and eventually uncovered that unpleasant fact - the reason for it being "written out" of the kernel was because by definition, a ieee 1394 device could send instructions to the computer, which is a direct conflict with the security provisions of the OS (which would thus defeat one of the OS's biggest strengths).

Yes, the info on "making linux work" is out there. Problem is, it's scattered about in various places online, and you have to go hunting for the specific info that you want. Linux would be a LOT more useful if all that information was INCLUDED with the OS in some way. To those of us who are willing to research, learn, and work for a result, yes it is doable (but takes a good deal of effort, there is no getting around that). But for the average moron who wants and expects to plug something in and have it work right away, it's completely impractical.

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 10:39 AM
Interesting! Thanks, I didn't know about this! No, I haven't attempted to mess with it for about 3 years. I assume that this info is more recent than that. Sounds like another little project to file away for the future, for sure. But it IS correct that firewire ability was "written out" of the kernel up until this 2.2 that you mention - I tried off and on for several years to make it work, had a "computer whiz" (I'm more of a hardware guy than a software / programming type) also give their best effort, we both consulted with various "linux gurus", did a LOT of research, and eventually uncovered that unpleasant fact - the reason for it being "written out" of the kernel was because by definition, a ieee 1394 device could send instructions to the computer, which is a direct conflict with the security provisions of the OS (which would thus defeat one of the OS's biggest strengths).

Yes, the info on "making linux work" is out there. Problem is, it's scattered about in various places online, and you have to go hunting for the specific info that you want. Linux would be a LOT more useful if all that information was INCLUDED with the OS in some way. To those of us who are willing to research, learn, and work for a result, yes it is doable (but takes a good deal of effort, there is no getting around that). But for the average moron who wants and expects to plug something in and have it work right away, it's completely impractical.

Ubuntu Linux was actually written specifically for people who just want to plug it in and have it work right away. If you are looking for an 'introductory' Linux to get your feet wet and learn your way around without having to worry about giving yourself migraines, I'd start with one of the flavors of Ubuntu, but I also recommend that folks, once they get fluent in it, to graduate to an 'adult' distro. :p

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 10:47 AM
Ubuntu Linux was actually written specifically for people who just want to plug it in and have it work right away. If you are looking for an 'introductory' Linux to get your feet wet and learn your way around without having to worry about giving yourself migraines, I'd start with one of the flavors of Ubuntu, but I also recommend that folks, once they get fluent in it, to graduate to an 'adult' distro. :p

I did a lot of reading,, after the third time my system was taken out by viruses.

I ended up starting out on Slackware and bought a book with the disks. and then trying several others.

PCLinuxOS is called the Disto Hopper stopper. lol.

One Day I might try Linux from Scratch. But am pleased with this system.

pcosmar
01-23-2014, 10:50 AM
But for the average moron who wants and expects to plug something in and have it work right away, it's completely impractical.

And that is the HUGE flaw in Windo$e. They made it so easy for idiots,, and compromised all the security to do it.

It will load almost anything,,which is why it loads every virus and malware without question.

Philhelm
01-23-2014, 11:55 AM
Bill who?

enhanced_deficit
01-23-2014, 12:10 PM
Is there some reason to think he's not a "moron tool" on software issues, too?

Ok, good point.

Corrected:
[...] had no idea he was such a moron tool on issues outside software grabbing/marketing/monopolizing.

Occam's Banana
01-23-2014, 12:26 PM
PCLinuxOS is called the Disto Hopper stopper. lol.

Arch Linux is what finally put a stop to my "distro hopping."

Anyone inclined to whining because an OS doesn't hold your hand is well-advised to stay away from Arch.

Currently, the "installer" is just three scripts - none of which are graphical (not even ncurses-based).

Rudeman
01-23-2014, 04:26 PM
Virus Compatibility
Trojan Compatibility
Malware compatibility

NSA Compatibility.

NO Thanks.
I use it for a game.. only.


Can't say I've had issues with virus/trojan/malware, at least not in a long time. Gaming is one of the compatibility issues, photoshop is another (GIMP isn't good enough), driver issues and a few other issues.

Don't get me wrong if I had to pick between Windows 8 or Linux I'd go with Linux. Until then I'll probably continue using Windows 7 unless there's a version of Linux worth changing to.

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 04:37 PM
Can't say I've had issues with virus/trojan/malware, at least not in a long time. Gaming is one of the compatibility issues, photoshop is another (GIMP isn't good enough), driver issues and a few other issues.

Don't get me wrong if I had to pick between Windows 8 or Linux I'd go with Linux. Until then I'll probably continue using Windows 7 unless there's a version of Linux worth changing to.

It's true that GIMP is not good enough. Not by a long shot. I'm a Photoshop expert, but with GIMP I'm all thumbs. One would think they could port Photoshop to *ux now that it runs so well in MacOS.

cjm
01-23-2014, 04:49 PM
Arch Linux is what finally put a stop to my "distro hopping."

I started with Slackware in 1996 and hopped through the next 4 or 5 years always coming back to Slackware. I'm set in my ways now.


Ubuntu Linux was actually written specifically for people who just want to plug it in and have it work right away. If you are looking for an 'introductory' Linux to get your feet wet and learn your way around without having to worry about giving yourself migraines, I'd start with one of the flavors of Ubuntu, but I also recommend that folks, once they get fluent in it, to graduate to an 'adult' distro. :p

Gunny, are you aware of this? http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/12/richard-stallman-calls-ubuntu-spyware-because-it-tracks-searches/

GunnyFreedom
01-23-2014, 05:20 PM
I started with Slackware in 1996 and hopped through the next 4 or 5 years always coming back to Slackware. I'm set in my ways now.



Gunny, are you aware of this? http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/12/richard-stallman-calls-ubuntu-spyware-because-it-tracks-searches/

Not surprised; I did say Ubuntu is just a 'training wheels' *ux. I'd still say someone brand new to *ux could do worse, just need to know ahead of time they need to shut off the web results from searches immediately. I agree with you that sucks bad, but considering my position is that they need to graduate to an 'adult' flavor of *ux before doing anything real with it, my basic position is unchanged. Use Ubuntu so that you get used to the environment, how Gnome works, and/or KDE, learning the Terminal and how commands work in *ux. How to install 3rd party software, compiling making installing and all that jazz. Once you have that exposure, then a 'grown-up' distro will be a LOT easier to figure out. I can't tell you how many times I've seen people jump into Linux for the first time, drop in a new window manager because they want some fancy theme, fail to update the bootloader and bork the install. I just want people to make their mistakes in a 'training' environment so that when they install their production environment they already know what's up. To me, Ubuntu is a 'training environment' more than anything.

RickyJ
01-26-2014, 02:13 AM
You assume that they want to.
I am convinced that they have been working on spying all along,, and their OS is designed for that.

It is defective by design. Intentional.

That may be true, but Apple still makes a much better OS and I have a feeling they also are in on spying, they just aren't so obvious about it. I think the majority of Microsoft's problems are bad management decisions, and some programmers that only got the job because they knew the right person.