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aGameOfThrones
06-19-2013, 02:27 AM
WASHINGTON (AP) The nation's teacher-training programs do not adequately prepare would-be educators for the classroom, even as they produce almost triple the number of graduates needed, according to a survey of more than 1,000 programs released Tuesday.

The National Council on Teacher Quality review is a scathing assessment of colleges' education programs and their admission standards, training and value. The report, which drew immediate criticism, was designed to be provocative and urges leaders at teacher-training programs to rethink what skills would-be educators need to be taught to thrive in the classrooms of today and tomorrow.

"Through an exhaustive and unprecedented examination of how these schools operate, the review finds they have become an industry of mediocrity, churning out first-year teachers with classroom management skills and content knowledge inadequate to thrive in classrooms" with an ever-increasing diversity of ethnic and socioeconomic students, the report's authors wrote.

"A vast majority of teacher preparation programs do not give aspiring teachers adequate return on their investment of time and tuition dollars," the report said.

The report was likely to drive debate about which students are prepared to be teachers in the coming decades and how they are prepared. Once a teacher settles into a classroom, it's tough to remove him or her involuntarily and opportunities for wholesale retraining are difficult if nearly impossible to find.

The answer, the council and its allies argue, is to make it more difficult for students to get into teacher preparation programs in the first place. And once there, they should be taught the most effective methods to help students.
"There's plenty of research out there that shows that teacher quality is the single most important factor," said Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, a supporter of the organization's work.

Democrat Markell said: "We have to attract the best candidates" possible.

To accomplish that goal, Markell earlier this year signed into law a measure making admission to education programs more difficult in his state. Potential teachers must either post a 3.0 grade point average or demonstrate "mastery" results on a standardized test such as the ACT or SAT before they're even admitted to a program.

It's an idea the council has applauded and suggests other states should consider to limit the number of candidates entering teacher training programs.

"You just have to have a pulse and you can get into some of these education schools," said Michael Petrilli, a vice president at the conservative-leaning Fordham Institute and a former official in the Department of Education's Office of Innovation and Improvement. "If policymakers took this report seriously, they'd be shutting down hundreds of programs."

Some 239,000 teachers are trained each year and 98,000 are hired meaning too many students are admitted and only a fraction find work.

Among the council's other findings:
Only a quarter of education programs limit admission to students in the top half of their high school class. The remaining three quarters of programs allow students who fared poorly in high school to train as teachers.

3-out-of-4 teacher training programs do not train potential educators how to teach reading based on the latest research. Instead, future teachers are left to develop their own methods.

Fewer than 1-in-9 programs for elementary educators are preparing students to teach Common Core State Standards, the achievement benchmarks for math and reading that have been adopted in 45 states and the District of Columbia. For programs preparing high school teachers, that rate is roughly a third of programs.

Only 7 percent of programs ensure student teachers are partnered with effective classroom teachers. Most often, a student teacher is placed into a classroom where a teacher is willing to have them, regardless of experience.

When asked how much experience they have, the most common answer from teachers is one year. First-year teachers reach around 1.5 million students.

The National Council on Teacher Quality, an advocacy group founded in 2000 to push an education overhaul that challenges the current system, has on its board veterans of the administrations of Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.

http://news.yahoo.com/report-too-many-teachers-too-little-quality-040423815.html

Legend1104
06-19-2013, 08:19 AM
So true. When I graduated, I felt that I did not really know anything about teaching. I was good with content knowledge, but I was never really shown how to teach. You are expected to just go out and figure it out on your own. When I was a first year teacher I was shooting in the dark. I am a 6th year teacher now and still have a lot of learning to do.

Cleaner44
06-19-2013, 08:28 AM
Different people learn in different ways. There are distinctive styles that should be identified and then students should be taught in their respective learning style. I seriously doubt that our teachers are ever given the tools to identify learning styles and then teach to them. This one size fits all approach isn't working. You would think that our public education system would have mastered developing the human mind by now, instead they are limping along with pathetic results.

Acala
06-19-2013, 08:30 AM
I am of the opinion that a college degree is irrelevant to effectiveness as a teacher. Love of learning, love of the students, and keen interest in the subject being taught are the necessary elements and none of them can be taught in college.

RonPaulMall
06-19-2013, 08:48 AM
So true. When I graduated, I felt that I did not really know anything about teaching. I was good with content knowledge, but I was never really shown how to teach. You are expected to just go out and figure it out on your own. When I was a first year teacher I was shooting in the dark. I am a 6th year teacher now and still have a lot of learning to do.

That is how it works in the University setting, and the US has the best teachers in the world when it comes to post secondary education. If you have the content knowledge, and the ability to communicate, you can be a great teacher. The problem with primary education is that the emphasis is all on "teaching" (there is actually a thing called an "Education Degree", and this is valued in the primary education system) rather than content combined with the fact that a large portion of the "students" don't belong in the classroom at all.

KEEF
06-19-2013, 09:03 AM
I am of the opinion that a college degree is irrelevant to effectiveness as a teacher. Love of learning, love of the students, and keen interest in the subject being taught are the necessary elements and none of them can be taught in college.

As a teacher and university professor, I totally agree with you. Although without college, I would had never fallen in love with the content I teach... I went in wanting to teach history and it wasn't until my first biology professor who linked the field of biology to the need for organisms fight for survival (i.e. survival of the fittest) and to reproduce (both sexual and/or asexual), as a former wrestler/college freshman full of hormones, I quickly gravitated to and picked up on that subject and took it through undergrad and grad school and have since then never looked back.

belian78
06-19-2013, 09:47 AM
Because teachers aren't meant to 'teach' in the conventional sense anymore. They are to read from the approved source material, hand out the approved section packet, and check answers against the approved answer matrix. Those that try to actually teach, and cultivate critical thinking skills in their students get reprimanded.

KEEF
06-19-2013, 09:50 AM
Because teachers aren't meant to 'teach' in the conventional sense anymore. They are to read from the approved source material, hand out the approved section packet, and check answers against the approved answer matrix. Those that try to actually teach, and cultivate critical thinking skills in their students get reprimanded.

In my years of education, I have yet to be reprimanded for doing just this.

NIU Students for Liberty
06-19-2013, 09:59 AM
No disagreement on my end. It pissed me off seeing not only people in my program at NIU but also teachers at the school I student-taught at and where I work now who only chose history (I teach social studies) as a fall back plan. No passion when it came to the content which meant no skill in trying to relate the material to students. Yet these people continue to get hired while the teachers who are actually driven are stuck on the side lines struggling to land an interview.

Education, whether it be public or private, has drifted from quality to quantity.

asurfaholic
06-19-2013, 11:19 AM
In my years of education, I have yet to be reprimanded for doing just this.

http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?415995-Teacher-Punished-for-Telling-Students-About-Constitutional-Rights&p=5051354#post5051354

fisharmor
06-19-2013, 11:26 AM
I was explaining how something works to a junior employee last year, I think it was how to calculate a simple interest balance over time, and several other people were watching. One of them asked me "Hey, did you ever think about being a teacher?"

My response was "What makes you think I'm not?"

Philhelm
06-19-2013, 12:51 PM
I was explaining how something works to a junior employee last year, I think it was how to calculate a simple interest balance over time, and several other people were watching. One of them asked me "Hey, did you ever think about being a teacher?"

My response was "What makes you think I'm not?"

Excellent answer, Your Grace.