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stu2002
04-30-2012, 05:02 AM
In a move that could help the government trim its burgeoning health care costs, the Food and Drug Administration may soon permit Americans to obtain some drugs used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes without obtaining a prescription.

The FDA says over-the-counter distribution would let patients get drugs for many common conditions without the time and expense of visiting a doctor, but medical providers call the change medically unsound and note that it also may mean that insurance no longer will pay for the drugs.

“The problem is medicine is just not that simple,” said Dr. Matthew Mintz, an internist at George Washington University Hospital. “You can’t just follow rules and weigh all the pros and cons. It needs to be individualized.”

http://goo.gl/aoFQt

tod evans
04-30-2012, 05:57 AM
I'd love to see the FDA on the chopping block right next to HUD and the Dept.of Ed.

stu2002
04-30-2012, 06:20 AM
I'd love to see the FDA on the chopping block right next to HUD and the Dept.of Ed.

But then who would protect us from ourselves??:D

specsaregood
04-30-2012, 07:06 AM
The FDA says over-the-counter distribution would let patients get drugs for many common conditions without the time and expense of visiting a doctor, but medical providers call the change medically unsound and note that it also may mean that insurance no longer will pay for the drugs.


So many modern doctors are just drug dealers in a labcoat.

stu2002
04-30-2012, 08:11 AM
So many modern doctors are just drug dealers in a labcoat.
:)

The Goat
04-30-2012, 08:15 AM
but medical providers call the change medically unsound and note that it also may mean that insurance no longer will pay for the drugs.

Please don't cut us out of the loop. XD



if the drugs are no longer covered by insurance and are OTC the price will drop so people can afford them.

angelatc
04-30-2012, 08:16 AM
In a move that could help the government trim its burgeoning health care costs, the Food and Drug Administration may soon permit Americans to obtain some drugs used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes without obtaining a prescription.

I don't know about diabetes, but as for high blood pressure - technology has made it much easier for patients to monitor their own BP at home how.

I agree that there's certainly a place for a medical professional in the over scheme of things, but the thought that the MDs spend much time "individualizing" each patients meds is a bit laughable.

My Mom is on BP medicine, and developed a cough that was a side effect of the med they had prescribed. The thing is, it took 2 years and umpteen visits to several different doctors to figure it out. In fact, they had her scheduled for surgery. About 2 days before the operation, the surgeon looked at her file and said "Are we sure this isn't from the BP medicine?" She was dumbfounded, and he said, "A dry cough is a common side effect of the BP drugs that end in "pril." He called her primary care, they decided to change her med, and the cough vanished almost overnight.

That's personalized care? 3 out of 4 doctors didn't notice something that, it turns out, is actually quite common?

My husband had a stroke, but his BP isn't really very high at all. They had him on BP medicine for a while, but we found a local MD who said he didn't need it as long as he monitors his BP. We were lucky, because we don't have insurance and likely wouldn't be able to afford the medicine long term, especially when it's coupled with an office visit every 6 months for the renewal of the prescription. If the stuff was available over the counter, we could easily (and thus be more likely to) handle an increase in his BP when it came up.

The medical community wailed like banshees when the FDA allowed Monistat for yeast infections to go over the counter too. We were warned that women would be mistreating themselves right and left. Granted, vaginal infections aren't as deadly as high blood pressure, but the only person I know that had an itch that Monistat didn't fix went to the doctor. Everything worked out fine, and we certainly haven't seen an outbreak of women dropping dead from undiagnosed vaginal infections.